Would Gronk benefit from work with Guerrero? Revisiting Brady's response

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Would Gronk benefit from work with Guerrero? Revisiting Brady's response

Back in December, after Rob Gronkowski underwent back surgery, Tom Brady was asked by WEEI's Kirk and Callahan show if the oft-injured All-Pro tight end would benefit from work with Brady's "body coach" Alex Guerrero.

It's a question worth asking again this week as news surfaced on Tuesday that Gronkowski and the Patriots agreed to restructure their deal for 2017. Gronkowski now has the opportunity to be paid as the top tight end in the league should he hit certain statistical benchmarks or be named an All-Pro.

But to reach those goals, he'll need to stay relatively healthy throughout the regular season. In seven seasons as a pro, he's been able to do that four times.

Perhaps an altered regimen, one like Brady's that focuses on pliability, would help him in his pursuit of maxing out his 2017 salary. When Brady was asked about a potential partnership between Gronkowski and Guerrero late last season, he said that the two had already done some work together. 

"I mean Gronk is so hard working, and Gronk has spent a lot of time with Alex at different points," Brady told WEEI at the time. "Gronk has his rehab and he’s going to do it, and I have no doubt he’s going to come back stronger and better than ever. All of us learn every year about things that work and don’t work. And it’s really up to the individual.

"Gronk, it depends what all the . . . I don’t want to single out Gronk because he’s the only one that's injured. There's a lot of players that get injured over the course of the year, and then you go about changes in your routine because you think this may work and this may not work.

"To me, I feel like it’s very touch-and-feel with how you do take care of your body. Some weeks it is a little more strengthening. Some weeks it’s a little more conditioning. Some weeks it’s a little more pliability depending on how your body feels. I don’t think people spend enough time on pliability at all. I think that is the missing third leg to what athletes in high school should be learning and college athletes. We learn at a young age it’s all about strengthening and conditioning. And strengthening at the expense of pliability, to me, gets you injured. If you’re injured you can’t play. If your body is your asset and you’re injured, you’re not going to have much of a career for any athlete."

Gronkowski's already had himself one of the best careers of any player who has played his position. But figuring out how to extend his career despite the pounding he has taken -- and surely will continue to take -- is a complicated endeavor. Does it mean improved pliability? Better nutrition and hydration? More sleep? 

In reality, any player would probably benefit from any of those things . . . as well as luck. Brady's admitted that some of the injuries Gronkowski has suffered in the past have been unavoidable.

"He’s dealt with certain things that are almost impossible to avoid on the football field," Brady said. "Sometimes it’s just bad luck. For me, I try and do all the things I can do to avoid as many things as possible and be as proactive as possible so that I can try to be out there every week. I believe that if you have a great foundation, it ends up being a lot harder to get hurt.

"That’s kind of where I focus my time and energy over the course of the week so that . . . you know you’re going to get hit, you know you’re going to sustain these impacts, and how can your body be prepared to withstand those things?"

Taking up Brady's workout routine resistance band excersise-for-resistance band exercise probably doesn't make sense for a 265-pound player who needs to be strong enough to block defensive ends and sturdy enough to absorb high-speed collisions down the seam. But sprinkling in some of the elements of Brady's prep, if he hasn't already, might not hurt. 

And after his recent contract restructure, Gronkowski may have more incentive than ever before to tinker with his program in the hopes of staying on the field.

Kyle Shanahan: One play I regret in Falcons' collapse vs. Patriots

Kyle Shanahan: One play I regret in Falcons' collapse vs. Patriots


Remember that Atlanta Falcons offensive game plan against the Patriots in the final five minutes of the Super Bowl?

Kyle Shanahan, then the Falcons offensive coordinator and now coach of the San Francisco 49ers won't forget it. If Atlanta had simply run the ball and kicked a field goal with an eight-point lead, the Falcons would have likely held off Tom Brady and the Pats' comeback from a 28-3 third-quarter deficit.

Shanahan told The Rich Eisen Show there's one play call he'd like to have back. 

"The second-and-10 that we got sacked on,” Shanahan said. “I wish I had dialed up something differently. And then the next play, we called an option to [Mohamed] Sanu, we got right back in field goal range, but we had a holding call on the play and it knocked us out some more, and an incompletion on the next one.”

Click here for the play: Patriots defensive lineman Trey Flowers sacked Matt Ryan for a 12-yard loss. 

"I go through every single play in the game, but when it comes down to it, the big one was the sack that we had on second-and-10,” Shanahan told Eisen. 

Shanahan probably won't see the Patriots again this season, unless it's in the Super Bowl. And with the 49ers rebuilding under him, that's not likely to happen.