First Pitch: The latest Sox newsrumorsspeculation

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First Pitch: The latest Sox newsrumorsspeculation

By Art Martone
CSNNE.com

Welcome toFirst Pitch, aquick spin around the world of Major League Baseball . . . or at leastthe corner of it that most concerns the Red Sox.(And on Saturday, that corner apparently extended all the way to a Starbucks in Chicago.)

NO NEWS IS . . . well, who knows?

The sighting of Theo Epstein, or a Theo Epstein lookalike, at that coffee house near Wrigley Field is closest thing we've come to moving this story forward over the last three days. Epstein is apparently returning no calls. There's nothing non-coffee-related coming out of Chicago. And Red Sox ownership? Their basic philosophy appears to be, "Who are these Cubs to whom you refer?" (csnne.com)

So in the absence of news, we have speculation and opinion:

Lou Merloni says let Theo go. (csnne.com)

The Boston Globe's Nick Cafardo thinks Larry Lucchino will once again become A Very Important Person in the Baseball Ops corner of Red Sox Nation if Epstein leaves.

Not enough to sustain you? Well, there's a little more to chew on in the managerial-search portion of our program:

The Sox haven't approached the Brewers about talking to Dale Sveum, but Sveum says he would be interested (csnne.com) in a tepid sort of "I'd be interested in managing anywhere" way . . . which makes sense, considering the Sox fired him (as third-base coach) in 2005. The Brewers say he'd be a fine choice, indeed.

The Boston Herald's John Tomase handicaps the managing field.

(Hey, we said there was a little more to chew on.)

And so we wait. And wait. And wait.

YOU'RE LUCKY WE DIDN'T CATCH YOU: While Lucchino admits that someone in the organization had to have approved it, he also claims Sox ownership was unaware of the participation of Messers Beckett, Lackey, Buchholz, Lester and Wakefield -- and the use of both Fenway Park and officially licensed Red Sox uniforms and logos -- in the now-infamous "Hell, Yeah, I Like Beer" video, and would have denied permission had they known. (csnne.com)

DON'T GET YOUR HOPES UP: Dreaming about Brian Cashman as Sox GM? Sorry, looks like he's headed back to New York. (ESPN)

GET REAL, RANDY: Speaking of the Yankees, Mike Lupica of the New York Daily News scoffs at Yankee president Randy Levine's dubbing their season "a bitter disappointment". He says the Yankees are built for regular-season success and postseason failure, and thus what happened to them is "quite normal".

YOU CAN BOOK THIS ONE, JOHN: John Feinstein was fascinated by the final day of the regular season (csnne.com) and was thinking of writing a book about it, but was told by his literary agent that, no matter how good the story is, Red Sox fans won't buy a single copy. (feinsteinonthebrink.com) And if Red Sox fans won't buy a baseball book, then that baseball book doesn't have much chance of financial success.

AND FINALLY . . . He's managed in two tough places, but Terry Francona says he'll take Boston over Philadelphia. (eye-on-baseball.blogs.cbsports.com)

Art Martone can be reached at amartone@comcastsportsnet.com.

First impressions from Red Sox' 8-3 win over Rockies

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First impressions from Red Sox' 8-3 win over Rockies

First impressions from the Red Sox' 8-3 win over the Colorado Rockies:

 

The Red Sox continue to use Fenway as their own little offensive playground.

Since April 20, the Red Sox are averaging exactly eight runs per game at home. That's just over a month of the covering 18 games.

They've also collected 10 or more hits in 16 of those 18 games, utilizing every bit of the field.

For the last two seasons, Fenway stopped being a tough place to play for opponents. But at home this year, the Sox have outscored opponents by 67 runs.

 

All of a sudden, the Red Sox are a triples team and Fenway is a triples haven.

A triple by Christian Vazquez - of all people -- gave the Red Sox a league-high 13 triples this season.

Fenway has a reputation for being a doubles park, but the ballpark has been home to 12 triples in 26 games - five by visiting teams and seven by the Red Sox. That translates into almost one every two games.

 

David Price was solid, but not spectacular.

The positives: Price got through the seventh inning for the fifth time this season. He walked just one and fanned six in seven innings.

He was hit hard a few times, with a homer into the visitor's bullpen allowed to Charlie Blackmon and a triple to the triangle for Carlos Gonzalez.

Consider it another step forward for Price, but it fell far short of dominant.

 

Koji Uehara's deception is heightened against teams that don't see him much.

Uehara allowed a leadoff single to D.J. LeMahieu, but then fanned three in a row, finishing each hitter off with his trademark split-finger fastball.

That pitch can be tough to recognize for hitters who see it a few times per season. For those in the National League who are largely unfamiliar with Uehara's splitter, it's apparently some sort of Kryptonite.