Bruins talk NHL lockout at golf tournament

878509.jpg

Bruins talk NHL lockout at golf tournament

They were golfing on Monday, and by the looks of things, the Bruins may have plenty of free time for more golf this fall.

Claude Julien, Cam Neely, and a number of Bruins players took part in the team's annual charity golf tournament on Monday, but golf wasn't exactly on the minds of everyone in the organization.

The NHL lockout deadline is Saturday, and without a new CBA in place, it looks more and more likely that it'll occur.

CSNNE's Jessica Moran was on the scene, where Bruins players like Shawn Thornton and Andrew Ference don't seem particularly happy with the process to date.

"We want to fix the problem but we're not just going to take a 20-percent cut or a 24-percent cut or whatever it is across the board and give it to rich teams to get richer," Thornton told reporters. "That's not the answer. It didn't work last time, we were told it would, and now we're looking for solutions and I think our proposal addresses those issues."

But are the players optimistic in a deal soon? Unfortunately, no.

"I don't know if optimistic is the right word, not the way things have been going so far," Ference said. "It's pretty tough to be optimistic. You know, I think that at the beginning of the summer there were a lot of great talks. Hopefully that can continue."

But the talks have slowed, and the two sides are still far apart. The NHL has been through a lockout in the recent past, with many players bolting overseas. That will certainly be the case again.

"It would be the Czech Republic for sure," David Krejci said when asked where he would play if there was a lockout. "That's where I live, that's where I'm from, so that's my home. It would be Czech, but I'm here, I really hope it's going to start. It was a long summer.

"I want to play somewhere because I haven't played in a while," Bruins goaltender Tuukka Rask said. "If you don't play and you jump right in the NHL you have an eight-month layover and you could be a little rusty."

Rust could be an issue for the Bruins once the NHL season begins whenever that is. But rest and health certainly shouldn't be. Unless any players get injured while playing overseas, the B's should be plenty healthy for the upcoming season.

"Never felt so healthy, so it's good," Thornton said. "All the injuries have healed up. I think that's probably true across the board. I've seen the guys I've been skating with and everybody looks ready to go."

Coach Julien expects each and every player to show up in shape when the time comes.

"I don't think there's a single lazy player on our hockey club that would stop training or stop getting themselves ready for a season," he said, "because I think everybody is anticipating that there is going to be a season and that's the way it should be."

But that anticipation diminishes by the day.

Pare 'brings energy' as big-bodied, sixth-round Bruins pick

Pare 'brings energy' as big-bodied, sixth-round Bruins pick

CHICAGO – The Bruins aren’t ever going to shy away from big, strong centers with a willingness to play on the physical side, so it was no surprise they selected big French-Canadian center Cedric Pare in the sixth round of the NHL Draft Saturday at the United Center.

MORE BRUINS

The 6-foot-2, 200-pound Pare was described as “a project” by Bruins assistant general manager Scott Bradley, who said that he’s looking forward to the big-bodied forward playing a top-six role in the QMJHL next season. Pare had five goals and 16 points in 64 games for the Saint John Sea Dogs before posting three points in 18 playoff games. Bradley said the Bruins hope to see more offense as he gets more exposure as a player.

“Pare is a developed kid that we got in the sixth round. He went to the Memorial Cup and we’ve seen good things from him. We think we got good value there,” said Bradley. “He plays with a lot of energy and I think his skating is undervalued. Over the course of the year he really picked it up with his skating, and his stride has lengthened a little bit. We just like that he plays with energy and he scored in the Memorial Cup despite playing a limited role.

“He was playing on the fourth line last year. I think this year he’ll be playing on one of their top lines as a top-six forward and he’ll get a lot of ice time...hopefully get some good development there.”

Pare indicated that the Bruins had shown interest in him throughout the season and he had an idea the Black and Gold might call his name in the later rounds. While there’s always room in the B’s prospect cupboard for a big-bodied center that plays with plenty of energy, it remains to be seen if Pare was worth using a sixth-round pick on when there are plenty of big-bodied hockey players out there willing to play with energy and aggressiveness. 

Bruins tap Maine-bound goalie Swayman in fourth round

Bruins tap Maine-bound goalie Swayman in fourth round

CHICAGO – It was thought the Bruins might swing for the fences with Boston University goalie Jake Oettinger, particularly if they traded down in the first round, but they ended up filling their goalie quota on Saturday in the fourth round of the NHL Draft at the United Center. The B’s selected University of Maine-bound Jeremy Swayman with the 111th pick in the draft after an impressive run for the Alaska native at Sioux Falls as a junior hockey player.

MORE BRUINS

The 6-foot-2, 183-pound Swayman posted a 2.90 goals-against average and a .914 save percentage in 32 games for a poor Sioux City junior team, but distinguished himself with his size, athleticism and competitiveness as the rare goalie prospect to come out of the great state of Alaska. Swayman was eating breakfast in his Alaskan home while watching himself get drafted by the Bruins. Needless to say, he was pumped as he readies for his first season in Hockey East.

“I’ve been working my whole life for this and just to kind of have the notion of, your work has paid off in a small area of time or a small trinket, it’s very worth all of the hard times and tough times, and kind of working at everything for it. It’s kind of a token back and just an incredible opportunity for sure,” said Swayman, who said he models his game after Braden Holtby while also envying Tuukka Rask’s flexibility. “I would describe myself as a challenge goalie. So, a competitive goalie just kind of fighting through traffic at all times. Being able to see the puck from anywhere on the ice, whether there is a screen in front or a point shot and, of course, a point blank shot. Again, I trust my ability on my skates. I have good feet. I can stay up longer than most goalies in situations where they would have to slide. So, I can stay up and cover more net on a backdoor pass, per say. I also like to cut down the angle a lot.”

Bruins assistant GM Scott Bradley admitted that Swayman wasn’t the first choice of everybody at the B’s draft table, but said the scouts were confident making him the pick after another goalie was taken off the board before him. There were three goalies taken in the fourth round, including Prince Albert netminder Ian Scott taken one pick before the B’s selection, so it’s difficult to tell which other goalie Boston had their eyes on.

Clearly, the hope now is that Swayman follows in a proud tradition of stud Black Bears goalies that include Ben Bishop, Jimmy Howard, Scott Darling, Mike Dunham and Garth Snow, and that the B’s have drafted a new goalie of the future with Malcolm Subban and Zane McIntyre in the AHL.

“He’s a goalie that [Bruins goalie coach] Bob Essensa had really liked, and had scouted him. Most of our staff was on board with the goalie. We targeted another goalie, but he just went before our pick,” said Bruins assistant GM Scott Bradley. “We heard good things from [the University of Maine] staff there, and we did our due diligence on him. We’re happy with him.”

It remains to be seen how Swayman develops in college, but the B’s hope it’s a steady, ascending development like that of McIntyre after they drafted him prior to his starring run at North Dakota.