Patriots looking to control Cardinals DT Dockett

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Patriots looking to control Cardinals DT Dockett

FOXBORO -- As defensive tackles go, Arizona's Darnell Dockett may be one of the most versatile and athletic in the NFL. Now in his ninth season, the three-time Pro Bowler has made a name for himself as one of the league's most productive and durable defensive linemen.

As the Patriots have studied Dockett this week, they've noticed just how disruptive he can be in the middle of the Cardinals defensive line. In Week 1 against the Seahawks he accumulated five tackles, a half-sack, five hurries and three quarterback hits.

After putting up 390 yards of total offense against the Titans last week, Dockett's Cardinals and their 3-4 scheme present what should be a more formidable challenge.

"He's probably one of the top defensive tackles in the league," Donald Thomas said of Dockett. "He's a leader out there, I think, for their 'D'-line and he's gets those guys going. He's been playing for a long time and he's a good player. You've got to be able to match up with him and control him and not let him get going."

At 6-foot-4 and 293 pounds, Dockett isn't the traditional space-eating defensive tackle. He's big enough to help Arizona protect against the run, but he's also quick enough to get after quarterbacks and make plays in the backfield.

"It makes him more explosive I think," Thomas said of Dockett's leaner build. "He's not one of those big 330 guys. He's fast, he can move, he's strong. He has a good combination of size and speed and I think that's what makes him such an elite player."

His desire stands out on film, too. For a guy who has started in every regular season game but one since he came into the league out of Florida State in 2004, Dockett still has a rookie's motor.

"I think it's his effort," said Logan Mankins in describing Dockett's strengths. "He's athletic, no doubt everyone in the NFL is, but he's a very high-effort guy. He's always playing very hard, always hustling up the field, always trying to get to the ball. I think that's his biggest attribute."

That effort up front doesn't always show up on the stat sheet, either. Helped by Dockett's strong showing in Week 1, linebacker Paris Lenon made two sacks. Daryl Washington, another Cards 'backer, had 10 tackles.

"They have big guys that move very well," Mankins said. "They have a very athletic front. They can pass rush, they play good against the run, they do pretty much all of it. They're a pretty complete defense."

Report: 3 owners unhappy with Kraft's amicus brief on behalf of Brady

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Report: 3 owners unhappy with Kraft's amicus brief on behalf of Brady

Three NFL owners have expressed “extreme disappointment” in Robert Kraft and the Patriots filing an amicus brief on behalf of Tom Brady in the quarterback’s appeal of the Second Circuit Court’s reinstatement of his Deflategate suspension, according to Jason Cole of Bleacher Report. 

The Patriots filed the brief on Wednesday. 

The owners see the move as a publicity stunt done to appease Brady and the Patriots fans, Cole said, and they don’t believe Kraft did it any seriousness because the issue speaks to NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell’s ability to punish players and undermines the league’s collective bargaining agreement with the players.

If Kraft thought it mattered, he wouldn't have done it, Cole said one owner told him. 
 

Collins, Hightower mum on contract talks

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Collins, Hightower mum on contract talks

FOXBORO – A fleet of Patriots have expiring contracts after this season but Dont'a Hightower and Jamie Collins are the two most prominent on that list.

With the sport being the way it is – a nearly 100-percent casualty rate every season – it’s never comfortable for a player to enter a contract year without knowing his long-term future. And it’s especially uncomfortable for players whose first contracts are expiring because the second NFL contract is usually the bonanza.

Both Hightower and Collins can entertain thoughts of contracts worth more than $50M if good fortune sticks with them.

The question as it pertains to both of these players is whether they get contract extensions this summer or whether they go into the year with contract pressure bearing down and ultimately become free agents.

Neither player was very forthcoming after their OTA practice Thursday.

With Collins, that’s often the case. He’s never been expansive with media. It was very uncharacteristic for Hightower to be so clipped in his answers, though.

Every question posed to Hightower was met with a variation of, “I’m just trying to get better.”

Asked about his contract, Hightower replied, “I ain’t got nothing to do with none of that. I’m just out here trying to get better with my teammates.”

When it was pointed out that Hightower does indeed have say on his contract, he answered, “That might be. But there’s a time and place for everything and I’m just out here trying to get better.

“If I get better I feel like that’ll take care of everything else,” he added. “If I get better each and every day that’s all I can ask for.”

Asked whether he’s at all focused on his deal, Collins replied, “No, I come out here and I handle my business and I let the rest speak for itself … My first priority is me. So I’m gonna handle me."