Box Score Bank: Secules to the Rescue!MORE: Has media been fair to Bobby V.?

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Box Score Bank: Secules to the Rescue!MORE: Has media been fair to Bobby V.?

Sunday afternoon at Gillette, the Pats will look to earn their sixth consecutive victory against the Arizona Cardinals. It's a mildly impressive streak that dates back to the early '90s when the Cardinals played in Phoenix, not Arizona and it gives me a fantastic excuse to fire up the Box Score Bank.

So, let's all take a trip back to . . . October 10, 1993

Jurassic Park was No. 1 at the Box Office. "Dreamlover" by Mariah Carey was in the midst of its eight-week run atop the Billboard charts. A few months before (July 27) Microsoft launched it's first version of Windows. Bill Belichick was in his third season as head coach of the Cleveland Browns. Chandler Jones was 3 . . .

And over at Sun Devil Stadium, the great Scott Secules was playing hero for the Pats

Final Score: New England 23, Phoenix 21

This victory is wildly important in the annals of Patriots history for a few reasons.

1. After an 0-4 start, it marked the first win of Bill Parcells' Patriots career.

2. Technically, it marked the first win of Drew Bledsoe's Patriots career.

3. It's the only time in Patriots history that Scott Secules threw a pass to Kevin Turner, who, in turn, lateraled the ball to Leonard Russell for an 82-yard gain.

I think.

Anyway, here's what happened: Bledsoe started the game, and had the Pats within striking distance (14-13), before exiting in the second half with a strained knee. (He would miss the next four weeks.) Bledsoe's replacement? The aforementioned Secules, who joined the Pats that season after three years of backing up Dan Marino in Miami.

The Cardinals led 21-16 with about five minutes left in the game, when Secules found Turner in the flat for a 12-yard gain. Before he was tackled, KT flipped the ball to a surging Russell, who broke free for 69 yards and trucked all the way down to the 2.

With 3:56 left, Secules found Big Ben Coates in the end zone for a game-winning score, thus writing the first chapter in nearly 20 years worth of Patriots dominance over the ArizonaPhoeniz Cardinals.

And it all started with Secules-to-Turner-to-Russell.

Rich can be reached at rlevine@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Rich on Twitter at http:twitter.comrich_levine

Van Noy sees playing-time bump as he learns Patriots language

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Van Noy sees playing-time bump as he learns Patriots language

When Kyle Van Noy was traded to the Patriots in late October, he had a lot to learn. He needed to understand the layout of his new team's maze-like facility. He needed to adjust to a new locker room. He needed to adapt to a new home. 

He also had to become fluent in a new language.

The former Lions 'backer was inactive for two weeks before he was comfortable enough with the Patriots system -- and the coaching staff was comfortable enough with him -- to get on the field. He played 29 snaps against the Niners in first game with his new club, then saw 28 plays against the Jets. On Sunday he saw his role expand as he played 40 of a possible 51 plays, which was more than Shea McClellin (38) or Dont'a Hightower (33). 

"Kyle has done a great job of working really hard to acclimate to what we’re doing, and he has had to learn really fast as far as the system, the communication, the language," said defensive coordinator Matt Patricia on a conference call Tuesday. "It’s like when you go to a different system, offensively or defensively, a lot of times it’s just learning the vernacular and the verbiage . . . That’s a big part of it. Then getting more familiar with that kind of terminology and the communication is critical because there’s a lot of calls and adjustments, things like that that we’ve got to do on the field."

Van Noy was making some of those calls himself on Sunday as he wore the green dot on his helmet when Hightower was on the sidelines. Even with the added responsibility, Van Noy was able to play freely enough that he put together what might have been the best game of his three-year career. 

Used at the end of the line of scrimmage as well as in a more traditional off-the-line linebacker role, Van Noy was effective in defending both the pass and the run: He stuffed three Rams rush attempts, he recorded a quarterback hit that led to an incompletion, he drew a holding call, and he recorded an athletic interception when he tracked a wobbling Jared Goff pass that floated over the middle after Jabaal Sheard hit Goff's arm as the rookie released his throw.

After several of his stand-out plays, Van Noy was visibly excited on the field and later on the sidelines. It was the culmination of six weeks of work, learning as much as he could from a coaching staff that was eager to teach him. 

"He’s extremely prideful in his work and his approach to the game," Patricia said. "He’s very cerebral. He’ll ask a lot of questions. He really wants to understand what we’re doing and why, which is great. We’re trying to give him those answers and insight into kind of where some of this either came from or developed or situations like that so that’s really good."