Carter-Williams goes 11th to Sixers

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Carter-Williams goes 11th to Sixers

By Matthew Fairburn

Back in the spring of 2008, the Boston Amateur Basketball Club was dominating in a first-round game of an AAU district tournament against a team thrown together by Zach Zagrowski, the stepfather of Michael Carter-Williams.

The scoreboard displayed a lopsided score in BABC’s favor, but CarterWilliams, who had recently completed his freshman season at Hamilton-Wenham High School, didn’t stop attacking. He knew he had a chance to prove himself against an elite program.

“I knew it would be a great opportunity, and I just tried to make the best out of it,” Carter-Williams said.

Carter-Williams did make the best of it. A bit undersized at the time, standing just 5-feet-9-inches tall, he showed off his range, making 3-pointer after 3-pointer. Despite BABC still playing him tight, he continued to make contested shots and drive the lane, impressing Papile and his opponents.

“Nobody really knew who he was, then he put like 35 on us,” recalled Alex Oriakhi, who played for BABC before continuing his career at Connecticut and  Missouri. “And I was like, ‘Wow, that kid can play.’ I always knew he had the ability to do it.”

Just a few months later, Carter-Williams was playing for BABC and was enrolled at St. Andrew’s School in Rhode Island. He had taken the next step in his basketball career.

“That’s when I really started to get noticed,” Carter-Williams recalled.During his time with BABC under Papile, Carter-Williams grew, most notably in height. He sprouted more than six inches during high school and was listed at 6-feet-6-inches tall as a sophomore at Syracuse.

But he also grew as a player. Prior to joining BABC, Carter-Williams played off the ball a lot, given his ability to score and create chances. When Carter-Williams started playing for BABC, Papile wanted to get the ball in his hands.


Zagrowski, Carter-Williams’ stepfather and coach, was hesitant.

“I remember telling Zach, ‘I want to get him on the ball and make a point guard out of him,’” Papile recalls. “He says ‘I don’t know, Mike can score.’ I said ‘I can see all that, but combine his scoring ability with his ability to see the floor, you
could have a pro some day.’”

Carter-Williams has now made Papile’s vision a reality. After two seasons at Syracuse, the 6-foot-6-inch point guard he declared for the 2013 NBA Draft and was drafted by the Philadelphia 76ers with the No. 11 pick in the first round on Thursday night.

He will now get to play with his former AAU teammate, Nerlens Noel, the No. 6 pick, whom the Sixers traded for.

Michigan’s Trey Burke may have been the first point guard taken in this year’s draft, but Carter-Williams, a Hamilton, Mass., native, will still hold a special place in BABC lore.

“He’s one of my favorites,” Papile said.

Jae Crowder talks about constant trade rumors; love for Boston and Brad Stevens

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Jae Crowder talks about constant trade rumors; love for Boston and Brad Stevens

Celtics forward Jae Crowder talks with Mike Gorman and Brian Scalabrine talks about building on a breakthrough season last year, and the love for his head coach Brad Stevens, and for the city of Boston.

Also, Kyle Draper and A. Sherrod Blakely talk about what lies ahead for Crowder in 2016/17.

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Bradley knows the risks of his all-out brand of defense

Bradley knows the risks of his all-out brand of defense

WALTHAM – There are a number of NBA players we have seen through the years whose effort level has been questioned.
 
But when it comes to Boston Celtics guard Avery Bradley, that has never been an issue.
 
In fact, Bradley’s all-out style of defense has been a major factor in him being sidelined for an extended period of time in each of his six NBA seasons.
 
Although he’s only 25 years old, Bradley is starting to embrace the idea of less all-out defense might not be such a bad idea.
 
“It’s hard to control my injuries because I play hard every single possession,” Bradley told CSNNE.com following the team’s first practice. “I can’t say that every NBA player doesn’t, but I know there’s not a lot. I play hard every single possession especially on the defensive end. That can take a toll on your body. I just have to make sure I’m taking care of myself and picking my spots a little better.”
 
Prior to the Celtics selecting Bradley with the 19th overall pick in the 2011, he suffered a dislocated shoulder injury. Throughout his five NBA seasons, the veteran guard has a long list of injuries which has sidelined him for at least five games every season in addition to missing some playoff games.
 
Knowing the risks involved in continuing his all-out brand of basketball, the fact that Bradley is even open to the idea of picking when to assert himself defensively and when to be more passive, is progress.
 
“I’m pretty sure someone like (ex-Celtics) Tony Allen …  he’s not going to go hard like every possession,” Bradley said. “He’s going to pick his spots, still play good defense.”
 
Which is exactly what Bradley is striving to do this season, and show that last season’s all-NBA First Team Defense nod wasn’t a fluke.

But as we have seen with Bradley throughout his career with the Celtics, he has a way of coming back every season having made a significant stride in some facet of the game to become closer to being a two-way player.
 
“That’s my goal; I want my teammates to be able to count on me playing well at both ends of the floor,” Bradley said.
 
And as I mentioned earlier, Bradley is still a relatively young guy who turns 26 years old in November.
 
‘I’m still a 90s baby’ just like everybody on this team,” quipped Bradley.
 
Being so young puts a premium of sorts on players to learn all they can as quickly as they can in relation to their respective team.
 
“I feel young; I feel young,” Bradley said. “I feel young. I still haven’t even played a full season yet. This will be my first season playing a whole season.”
 
Listening to Bradley talk about adjusting how he plays defensively, it’s pretty clear that he’s having an internal tug-of-war between continuing to play elite defense and easing up defensively.
 
“That’s just me. Some people can do it. Maybe I could take some (plays) off, play passing lanes,” Bradley said. “But I don’t think I’ll ever change into that. It could help our team out a little bit.”