Why did Yao Ming say no thanks to the Hall of Fame?

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Why did Yao Ming say no thanks to the Hall of Fame?

From Comcast SportsNet Wednesday, August 31, 2011
HOUSTON (AP) -- Yao Ming's agent has asked the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame to set aside the former All-Star center's nomination for a later year. Yao, who retired in July, was nominated by a member of the Chinese media as a contributor to the game, and would've been eligible for induction as early as 2012. But Hall of Fame president and CEO John Doleva said Yao's agent, John Huizinga, called Wednesday morning to request that Yao's nomination be tabled for now. KRIV-TV first reported the request. Huizinga did not immediately return a phone message. Doleva said Huizinga told him that Yao feels it's too soon for him to be placed on the ballot. "He (Huizinga) indicated that Yao has great respect for the institution and equal respect for those elected before his consideration," Doleva said in a phone interview. "He just feels that it's too soon to be considered as a contributor." An eight-time All-Star with the Houston Rockets, Yao's career was cut short by foot and leg injuries. Yao would be eligible to enter the Hall of Fame as a player in 2017 -- five full seasons after his retirement. He's more likely, though, to enter as a contributor after bridging the NBA to the Asian market. His charisma, popularity and basketball skills helped spike merchandise sales and prompted record TV ratings for games after the Rockets made him the top overall pick in the 2002 draft. NBA commissioner David Stern called Yao "a transformational player and a testament to the globalization of our game." Yao also donated 2 million to set up a foundation to rebuild schools destroyed by the earthquake in Sichuan province in May 2008. He carried the Olympic torch through Tiananmen Square and his country's flag during the opening ceremonies at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Doleva said Yao asked for no specific timetable to be reconsidered for induction. "I got the feeling that he and his people have thought long and hard about this," Doleva said. "I appreciated the fact that he referenced his respect for the institution, especially for those who've been elected." Doleva said he'll wait for Yao to contact the Hall again before the nomination will be put back in play. His credentials will then be considered by an international panel. "It really, at this point, would be his call," Doleva said. "The ball is in his court."

Ainge on no trades at deadline: ‘Wasn’t for lack of trying’

Ainge on no trades at deadline: ‘Wasn’t for lack of trying’

For the second straight season the trade deadline came and went with no moves from the Boston Celtics.

President of basketball operations Danny Ainge continues to look at the big picture as his team moves forward with their roster intact.

“It wasn’t for lack of trying, last year and this year,” said Ainge. “We came away with Al Horford in the summer. We drafted Jaylen Brown, Jaylen just continually getting better. I’m very excited about the future of both those guys. We were also able to get Ante Zizic, who is having a terrific year over in Turkey. I think that our future is looking good.

“We hope to have another good summer this year, whether we use the draft pick, whether we trade the draft pick. I think we can’t go wrong, as long as we don’t screw it up and pay too much for certain assets.”

Ainge: Adding players 'sometimes messes up your chemistry’

Ainge: Adding players 'sometimes messes up your chemistry’

With the NBA trade deadline in the rear view mirror, the Celtics will have to turn to the buyout market if they are looking to make changes to their roster.

Talking to CSN Celtics Insider A. Sherrod Blakely, Danny Ainge explained why signing players who have  been bought out can be a risky move for a team like the Celtics.

“We’ll weigh each guy that comes on the market and see if that can be a boost to our team,” explained Ainge. “At the same time, I like our team. Bringing in new players sometimes messes up your whole chemistry, and it shifts somebody into a different role that they’re not accustomed to doing. You better know what you’re getting.

“We brought in Michael Finley, Sam Cassell. . . PJ Brown turned out to be a very good asset to us. Most of the time it sort of disrupts things. At the end of the year you go, ‘wow, we probably shouldn’t have done that.’ Even though on paper it looked like a great acquisition, it wasn’t as good as everyone thought it would be.”