Valentine: Red Sox 'shouldnt be defined by their record'

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Valentine: Red Sox 'shouldnt be defined by their record'

SALEM Bobby Valentine appeared relaxed, comfortable, and animated. He was effusive, engaging, and loquacious. It was a version of Valentine that Red Sox fans rarely got to see this past season. I didn't get a chance to rattle on during the season because they wanted a quieter, calmer version of Bobby Valentine, Valentine said, wrapping up after almost 90 minutes Thursday night as part of Salem State Universitys speakers series. Valentine entertained the crowd of about 800 with stories from his life in baseball, including his one year as the manager of the Red Sox before he was fired on Oct. 4, the day after the season ended with the Sox in last place in the American League East, their record of 69-83 the worst since 1966. Hes confident the last year will lead to better things for him. Something really good is going to happen in my life because of the experience I had this season, he said. People say, Oh, yeah, you had 69 good days. But there were more. Since then, he said hes been doing greatI have a million plans, running around the country, trying to make my life worthwhile. Although he did not get into specifics about what is next for him professionally, Valentine, who has always been very involved in charitable works, is planning to help with the relief efforts in New York and New Jersey in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy.  In December, he will rappel down the side of the tallest building in his hometown of Stamford, Conn., as a charitable fundraiser.  He will be dressed as an elf. Along with himself, Valentine said he thought the 2013 Red Sox team would be better because of all the adversity the 2012 edition faced, as long it can stay healthy. I think the team is going to be better because of all the nonsense this year, Valentine said. That group of guys shouldnt be defined by their record because there were some great efforts. Valentine spoke from a stage inside the OKeefe Sports Center. He was accompanied by Hall of Fame baseball writer Peter Gammons, acting as the interviewer.  After about an hour, Valentine took some questions from  the audience. Valentine offered no major insights or answers on the disastrous season, saying Im one of those guys I dont look back. I dont do rewind Ive moved on where I wake up in the morning and I think its going to be the best day of my life. Things didnt go the way I wanted, no doubt about it. They didnt go the way you wanted, but every day I gave my best damn effort. Valentine also offered some thinly veiled jabs. About his successor, John Farrell, he said: I dont know him from Adam. Everyone tells me hes a good guy, gets along with the media and the front office. Thats a good start. No doubt a reference to his strained relations with the front office. He also said: I had a back-up catcher, I wont say who, he always wanted to know when he was going to play. Once a week. Be ready to play. That would be Kelly Shoppach, who was traded to the Mets in August for right-hander Pedro Beato. About the communication snafus that happened throughout the season, Valentine said its not always necessary for everyone to know everything, including himself. But, "attitude filters down. Information doesnt always have to. A questioner from the audience began to ask what it was like watching Daniel Bard slowly implode. Valentine quickly interjected, You thought that was slow? The quip drew laughter from the crowd, as did many of his stories.  But Valentine also said I think Bard will be alright next year, though. He praised coaches Randy Niemann, and Jerry Royster, for his work with third baseman Will Middlebrooks and shortstop Mike Aviles, and former hitting coach Dave Magadan, whom he said will leave a big void with his departure to Texas. Valentine said he did not support the decision to fire pitching coach Bob McClure.   Without singling out anyone in particular, he said, you need coaches who speak your own language.  Valentine wrapped up his talk, saying If you really want to be successful, there are three Rs of success: Responsibility, respect, and reality We have to be responsible to each other and our society, we have to respect one another, and we got to deal with reality. Change is not something anyone likes, but it is time to change. With that, he wrapped up his session.

Pedroia doesn't have MRI, still listed as day-to-day with ankle/knee soreness

Pedroia doesn't have MRI, still listed as day-to-day with ankle/knee soreness

Three weeks into the season, health has dominated the conversation with the Red Sox. And it’s much more than just the flu.

A scheduled off-day Monday brought something resembling an update for three players worth roughly $63 million in salary.

Dustin Pedroia, Orioles peacemaker, was examined at Massachusetts General Hospital and remains day-to-day because of left ankle and left knee soreness. He did not undergo an MRI, with his condition apparently good enough that the team felt it was unnecessary -- even though the message delivered on Sunday by manager John Farrell was that the Sox wanted to rule everything out.

Pedroia hasn’t played since he was spiked by Manny Machado on Friday in Baltimore.

Pablo Sandoval, at some point Monday, was slated to have an MRI after spraining his right knee Sunday. A further evaluation is to come Tuesday, so his status remains unclear.

David Price, meanwhile, threw a 45-pitch bullpen at Fenway Park on his long journey back from a left elbow strain. There were simulated inning breaks and, naturally, what’s next is still to be seen. Facing hitters shouldn’t be too far away, Farrell has suggested.

Bills decline to match Patriots offer to RB Mike Gillislee

Bills decline to match Patriots offer to RB Mike Gillislee

The Patriots have themselves another "big back" option for 2017. 

The Bills announced that they have opted not to match the restricted free agent offer sheet that New England made to Mike Gillislee last week. That means the 5-foot-11, 219-pounder is now a member of the Patriots. Buffalo had until 4 p.m. on Monday to match.

Gillislee was reportedly extended an offer sheet by the Patriots that is worth $6.4 million and $4 million in the first year. The Bills had the cap space to match the offer, but with LeSean McCoy already atop their depth chart, the price tag may have been too rich for them to choose to hold onto the 26-year-old.

Because Gillislee was given the original-round tender by the Bills, the Patriots will send Buffalo a fifth-round pick as compensation. That gives Bill Belichick and Nick Caserio six picks in this weekend's draft: two thirds, a fourth, a fifth, a sixth and a seventh.

Gillislee joins Rex Burkhead, Dion Lewis, James White, Brandon Bolden and DJ Foster on the running back depth chart in New England.