URI is the lone local N.I.T. pick

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URI is the lone local N.I.T. pick

By Mary Paoletti
CSNNE.com

New England teams have not had good luck in the 2010 postseason.

The N.I.T., a tournament lacking the glamour of the Big Dance but an extension of the season nonetheless, saw four schools from the northeast gain entry; UConn, Quinnipiac, Northeastern, and Rhode Island.

Northeastern was the first to get tossed. Barely. Last Tuesday No. 5 NU played within two points of the two-time national champion Connecticut Huskies. The fourth-seeded Big East brawler sat in a six-point hole until senior Jerome Dyson took over the offense, scoring 11 of UConns final 13 points to help the team escape with a 59-57 win.

"I didn't want it to go down and end like that," the guard said. "I just tried to be more aggressive."

Dysons desperation to end a down season on an upswing was not enough to save Connecticut Monday night. The Huskies missed an opportunity to put away No. 1 seed Virginia Tech in the closing seconds of the second-round game and lost, 65-63. It was an almost appropriate end to months of struggle; 11 ticks left on the clock and not only did Kemba Walkers shot rim out, but senior Gavin Edwards missed an open layup after collecting the rebound, ending the game and the season.

The Huskies join Quinnipiac on the heap of lost postseason hopes.

The Bobcats were Virginia Techs first victim in a Mar. 17 match up. Though No. 8 seed QU wasnt expected to beat the No. 1 Hokies -- an ACC squad widely regarded as an NCAA Tournament snub -- the 20-point steamrolling was still painful. Quinnipiac had earned top regular-season honors by beating every team in the NEC at least once en route to its 15-3 conference record. Among those wins was an 87-79 road stunner against eventual league champion Robert Morris.

Sophomore guard James Johnson had 28 points on that February day, but it was an effort he couldnt replicate against an ACC team in the first round of the N.I.T. Johnson notched just eight points against the Hokies stingy defense, symbolizing Quinnipiacs overall struggle. The Bobcats shot just 38.1 percent from the floor (24-for-63) and were outrebounded 42-30. Think that the boards are a secondary statistic in an 81-61 blowout? QU came into the N.I.T. ranked No. 1 nationally in rebounding margin (9.2) and seventh in rebounds per game (40.7). Getting out-muscled on the glass, in territory that the Bobcats reigned over so absolutely all year, was an out-of-conference reality check.

That kind of shock isnt something that URI worries about.

"We know what the NIT is," Rams center Will Martel said. "We've only been to the second round, but we're experienced. I think we've got a good shot at winning the championship."

Martel might be right.

Before losing 6 of its last 10 games, Rhode Island was 19-3 and hot for an NCAA Tournament bid. The Runnin Rams were eating up teams like Northeastern, Dayton, and Oklahoma State by playing smart but gusty basketball. And a deep bench helped keep composure consistent. These qualities, despite a drawn-out stumble at the end of the year, are resurfacing for URI now in the N.I.T.

Round one challenged No. 2 seed Rhody with the likes of John Shurna, seventh-seeded Northwesterns leading scorer (18.3 ppg). Coach Jim Baron dug into his bench, as he had all year, and came up with a five-man defensive rotation. The tag team man-to-man effort kept Shurna below his average and ensured the Rams a 76-64 win.

The story was similar in URIs second round contest. On Monday night, NBA prospect Luke Babbitt (22.1 ppg) led sixth-seeded Nevada into battle. Defense once again won the day as Rhode Island limited the WACs Player of the Year to just 14 points. Delroy James, a junior forward for the Rams, was not only instrumental in shutting down Babbitt but also went off on the other end of the floor for a career-high 34 points.

So URIs season continues to inch closer to April. But in this round the Rams stand alone as the last New England representative. Can Rhody, the Atlantic 10s fith-place finisher, handle the Hokies? The quarterfinal contest will mark the Rams as the third team from the Northeast to try.

Maybe three will be a lucky number.

This is our third straight N.I.T.," Will Martel said. We laid an egg my freshman year. There's no way that's ever going to happen again."
Mary Paoletti is on Twitter at http:twitter.comMary_Paoletti

Royer's late goal rallies Red Bulls past Revolution, 2-1

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Royer's late goal rallies Red Bulls past Revolution, 2-1

HARRISON, N.J. - Daniel Royer finished a nice sequence in the 74th minute, Luis Robles made a diving save in the closing minutes and the New York Red Bulls rallied to beat the New England Revolution 2-1 on Saturday night.

Felipe sent the ball left to Kemar Lawrence alongside the box and he put a cross to Royer on the back post for an easy finish on his fourth goal.

Robles, who only allowed Lee Nguyen's penalty kick in the ninth minute, preserved the win with his fourth save, diving to his left to block Diego Fagundez's shot from outside the box.

Bradley Wright-Phillips tied it for New York (6-6-2), which was winless in its last four matches, when he pounced on a loose ball and backheeled it into the net. New England goalkeeper Cody Cropper had pounced on a cross by Kemar Lawance, but Cropper could hold on and Wright-Phillips was there to clean up for his sixth goal.

Damien Perrinelle fouled Fagundez in the penalty area after a great pass from Kei Kamara, allowing Nguyen to step up for his sixth goal. New England (4-5-4) had won two straight and lost just one of its previous six. It is 0-5-2 on the road.

Brian Johnson: 'Awesome feeling' after five-hitter vs. Mariners

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Brian Johnson: 'Awesome feeling' after five-hitter vs. Mariners

BOSTON - Brian Johnson had quite a turnaround in his second time on Fenway Park's mound.

Johnson pitched a five-hitter in his first big league appearance at Fenway, and the Boston Red Sox stretched their winning streak to a season-high six games with a 6-0 victory over the Seattle Mariners on Saturday.

The 26-year-old left-hander became the first Red Sox pitcher to throw a shutout in his first Fenway start since Pedro Martinez on April 11, 1998. In Johnson's first start in Fenway - his fourth as a professional - he sustained a season-ending facial fracture when he hit by a line drive while pitching for Class A Lowell in 2012.

"The last time I walked off the mound here was 2012 and I made two pitches," Johnson said. "Today I went nine innings. Today was pretty cool."

Johnson left Triple-A for a little over a month last season to get treatment for an anxiety issue.

"Obviously with some stuff that I've been gone through in my career, it's an awesome feeling" he said.

But despite the stellar outing, Johnson was optioned back to Triple-A after the game.

"That's the reality of the game," Red Sox manager John Farrell said. "We had a chance to congratulate him and yet option him back to Pawtucket, with David Price coming here Monday."

Brought up from the minors for the start, Johnson (2-0) gave up five singles, struck out eight and walked none. His only previous big league starts were at Houston on July 21, 2015, and at Toronto on April 18 this year.

Johnson was helped by a semi-leaping catch by center fielder Jackie Bradley Jr. at the wall in the sixth, Bradley's diving grab of Nelson Cruz's sinking liner in the ninth and Bradley's game-ending running catch of Kyle Seager's drive.

Xander Bogaerts' RBI single triggered a three-run first inning and Bradley hit a two-run homer in the sixth

Shut out for the second straight day, Seattle has lost seven of eight.

"Their guy threw the ball over the plate. He threw strikes," Mariners manager Scott Servais said. "I won't take anything away from what he did, but we're not swinging the bat very well."

Rob Whalen (0-1) gave up five runs and seven hits over 5 1/3 innings in his Mariners' debut, his first big league start since Aug. 23 for Atlanta. He is Seattle's 12th starting pitcher, the most in the major leagues.

Andrew Benintendi and Sandy Leon also had RBI singles in the first, when the Red Sox had two batters hit by pitches, two walks and two runners thrown out on the bases - Dustin Pedroia at third for the first out and Hanley Ramirez at the plate for the last.