Quick Slants The Column: On booing Goodell and overvaluing Jimmy G

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Quick Slants The Column: On booing Goodell and overvaluing Jimmy G

Big night, Philadelphia. How you gonna treat the man NFL owners pay $35 million to be their meat shield? The first round of the draft is one of the few Roger Goodell appearances the league can’t manage. Released from the protection of John Mara’s coat pocket, Goodell has to hear a voice vote from fans every time he approaches the mic. He can grin, bang nipples and backslap all he wants with the first-rounders and sling that “Welcome to the family!” line of BS. He can hit the stage with the ghosts of Reggie White, Buddy Ryan and Chuck Bednarik. Philly’s too smart to get caught watching the paint dry. 

Got into a brief and spirited debate on the topic of Jimmy Garoppolo this morning on our “Boston Sports Tonight” email chain. I opined that perhaps Garoppolo is a bit overrated. Overvalued may have been a better adjective. Here’s why. With a fleet of teams dying for a quarterback they can build around, the Patriots squelched all Jimmy G suitors by declaring him untouchable. We may ultimately find out it was all a ruse and the team winds up getting a boatload of picks in exchange for him but from everything I’ve been told since September that’s not happening. Garoppolo will stay a Patriot and the team will figure out later how to proceed with him once his contract is up in March.

If Garoppolo isn’t franchised and doesn’t sign an extension to back up Tom Brady until Brady either retires (not on the horizon) or is traded (gasp), then why did the team pass on the haul it could have had? The theory most often posited is that Garoppolo is Brady insurance. If Brady gets hurt in 2017 and Jacoby Brissett is the next-man-up, the team is cooked. But that reality has existed throughout Brady’s tenure whether he had Rohan Davey, Matt Gutierrez, Matt Cassel, Brian Hoyer or Ryan Mallett behind him. It didn’t faze them then. Garoppolo is better than all of them. Potentially. And that’s probably why the Patriots don’t want to make a decision on him before they have to. They look at all these forever .500 teams trying to find a quarterback answer and think, “There, but for the grace of God and the presence of Brady, go I.” Garoppolo isn’t going to be better than Brady. But he fits the suit better than anyone they’ve ever had and they like the fact they found him, developed him and were right about him. Clearly they believe he is a greater asset as a backup with a soon-to-expire contract and a complicated future than the collection of young players they’d be able to draft with whatever picks they got back in a deal. This, of course, runs counter to the way the team has traditionally done business. Bill Belichick and Nick Caserio have found innovative ways to acquire, stockpile and flip picks. The fact the team’s already got its 2017 draft haul of Brandin Cooks, Kony Ealy, Dwayne Allen and Mike Gillislee thanks to pick-flipping. Garoppolo could yield the next batch of picks the Patriots could use in the “rent-to-own” model they’ve shrewdly adopted. But Garoppolo is the extreme outlier. And the Brady-Garoppolo-what’ll-they-do dance is fascinating because it highlights the confluence of everything – draft, free agency, cap management, trades, potential vs. proven, old vs. young, icon vs. phenom – at the most important position in sports on the greatest franchise of this era. 

Which brings me to this: we’ll have former Patriots offensive coordinator Charlie Weis in studio tonight at 9pm on Boston Sports Tonight helping us through the first round of the draft. Looking forward to his insight on why Garoppolo is persona-non-tradeable. Put the over-under on “Tommys” at about 47.

Prototypical Patriots: Hansen's size, elusiveness would be a handful

Prototypical Patriots: Hansen's size, elusiveness would be a handful

The Patriots were pretty well-stocked at receiver in 2016, and position coach Chad O'Shea only picked up one of the most explosive players in the league when Brandin Cooks was dealt by New Orleans to New England this offseason.

Still, we know we can't rule anything out. That's why we're going to take a quick look at a handful of the athletic pass-catchers -- both slots and outside-the-numbers types -- in this year's draft class who look like they could make Tom Brady's life a little easier. 

PHIL PERRY'S PROTOTYPICAL PATRIOTS DRAFT PREVIEW

Zay Jones, East Carolina, 6-foot-2, 205 pounds: One of the best receiver prospects in this year's class, Jones' performance at the Senior Bowl should put to rest any concerns that he simply beat up on lower-level competition when he went off for 158 catches and 1,746 yards and eight scores last season. He has the size and athleticism (4.45-second 40-yard dash, 36.5-inch vertical, 133-inch broad jump) to play on the outside, but his quickness would allow him to thrive in the slot as well (4.01-second 20-yard shuttle, 11.17-second 60-yard shuttle). That kind of versatility would make him an ideal fit in New England but he's almost guaranteed to be gone by the time the second round rolls around. 

Cooper Kupp, Eastern Washington, 6-foot-2, 204 pounds: Kupp's long speed (4.62-second 40) may limit him to slot work in the NFL, but that's fine. His ability to run routes is among the best in the draft class, and he showed an uncanny ability to separate even against superior athletes with Washington (8 catches, 145 yards, 3 touchdowns in 2014), Oregon (15 catches, 246 yards, 3 touchdowns in 2015) and at this year's Senior Bowl. Julian Edelman and Danny Amendola won't play forever, and if the Patriots are looking for their slot of the future Kupp would be a good match. 

Chad Hansen, Cal, 6-foot-2, 202 pounds: In terms of his experience running a variety of routes, Hansen is more like an Antithetical Patriot. He aligned almost exclusively out wide and on the right side of Cal's formations, and according to Pro Football Focus 73.6 percent of his targets came on screens (where he was surprisingly elusive after the catch in one-on-one situations), hitches and go routes. Though his numbers at the combine were relatively pedestrian, he's quick for his size (6.74-second three-cone drill, 4.13-second short shuttle) and he plays faster than the numbers would indicate. Plus, he's one of the most coordinated outside receivers in the class. He's excellent at using his frame to high-point passes along the sidelines, and he has good awareness to get his feet down in-bounds. With plenty of room to grow after just one season as a starter with the Bears (he transferred from Idaho State after spending the 2013 season there), Hansen is the kind of work-in-progress prospect who could blossom with a year of seasoning in New England. 

Taywan Taylor, Western Kentucky, 5-foot-11, 203 pounds: Though his timed speed was nothing to write home about (4.5-second 40), Taylor is another player who seemed to play faster than the numbers would indicate. Even if his speed doesn't totally translate from Conference USA to the NFL, which it very well may not, his shiftiness should allow him to create separation at the next level. He ran a 6.57-second three-cone drill, a 4.21-second short shuttle, and he looks like a middle-round selection who could figure into a slot role with the Patriots.

ArDarius Stewart, Alabama, 5-foot-11, 204 pounds: A nice recommendation from Nick Saban wouldn't hurt, but even if Stewart didn't play under Bill Belichick's good friend he'd be featured in this space. Fast enough (4.49-second 40), explosive enough (34-inch vertical, 124-inch broad jump), competitive and physical, Stewart looks like the kind of versatile option that the Patriots could align just about anywhere depending on the matchups. He's a polished route-runner who can beat corners with his hands or head-fakes, and when attacking contested passes he has the balance to hold his own at the moment of truth. An effective blocker -- key in the Patriots system -- and a potential kick-return option, there's not much to nit-pick about his fit in Foxboro. The only questions are a) can the Patriots find room for him? And b) does he fall far enough to land in their laps? NFL.com's Lance Zierlein compares him to Chris Hogan.

Mack Hollins, North Carolina, 6-foot-4, 221 pounds: If you're looking for big-time college production, Hollins probably isn't your guy. Still, his size (33-inch arms, 10.5-inch hands) and explosiveness (120-inch broad jump) give him big-play potential in the NFL. He had 20 touchdowns on 71 touches for the Tar Heels. As far as the Patriots are concerned, what might make Hollins worthy of a mid-to-late round pick is that he was a four-year special teams captain and will provide immediate help on punt and kickoff units.

 

Brady sends message of sympathy and support to Isaiah on Instagram

Brady sends message of sympathy and support to Isaiah on Instagram

Patriots quarterback Tom Brady sent a good luck message to Celtics guard Isaiah Thomas on Friday as the Celtics look to turn their series around against the Chicago Bulls. Thomas and Brady first met in the Hamptons at the recruitment party for then free-agent Kevin Durant. 

Brady didn't help the Celtics land KD, but let's hope this effort is more successful.

It's how you come back... Good luck tonight. We all have your back! #YourTurn

A post shared by Tom Brady (@tombrady) on