Thornton: 'I don't like the way things are going'

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Thornton: 'I don't like the way things are going'

Shawn Thornton is back in Boston after spending some time back home skating with the Oshawa Generals over the last few weeks, and hes concerned about the direction the NHL lockout is taking.

The calendar has now entered November, all NHL games up until Dec. 1 have been cancelled and its now Day No. 47 of the lockout.

The Bruins fourth-line winger granted an interview with Greg Hill on the WAAF Hillman Morning Show, and said that he along with many other NHL players isnt sure what to make of the reports the Winter Classic may be cancelled at the end of this week. Thornton attended the NHLPANHL negotiations in Toronto two weeks ago and spoke his mind, and has mixed feelings as a player in his mid-30s that will be giving up key earning years if the NHL misses an entire season due to the lockout.

I havent heard anything good. From what Ive heard the NHL has refused to meet with us and then is going to go ahead and cancel the Winter Classic, said Thornton. I dont know if its to create leverage. I really dont have a feel for this. You would think theyd want to get everybody in a room to find a solution for this.

I dont know if its just a PR trick. I dont know if theyre adamant about shutting down for the season or only having a half-season. I dont have a feel for it, but either way I dont like the way things are going.

The 35-year-old has previously called the two-year, 2.2 million contract extension he signed going into this season as his nest egg, and is legitimately concerned about kissing some or all of that money goodbye due to labor issues.

Im worried. Financially Ive made some pretty good money the last couple of years. So Im not hurting, but Im definitely concerned that I dont have any paychecks coming in at this point, said Thornton. For guys like me I have a few years left and Im kind of caught in the middle and squeezed out on both sides. If this goes on for a year or two then Im probably done and I have to go back to working for a living.

Thats fine. Ive done it before. I worked in a steel factory when I was younger. But on the other side Id like to play out the last two years of my contract and be a little bit ahead after fighting 400 times over the last 15 years.

Thornton worked the late shift in an Oshawa-area steel factory from 16-19 years old that has employed his father for 37 years, so he knows what working for a living is all about. He also knows that NHL careers are essentially on borrowed time, and is just hoping a solution over the next month will let him put off the real world for a few more years.

Its not the end of the world. I get it, said Thornton. But if I could not go back there and play out the last couple of years then that would be ideal.

There is a faction of NHL players particularly the veterans that sound increasingly ready to make some kind of deal with the league if discussion sparks up again, so perhaps that will happen this week instead of a Debbie Downer announcement canceling the Jan. 1 Winter Classic.

WATCH: Bruins' Backes battles with Benn right after opening faceoff

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WATCH: Bruins' Backes battles with Benn right after opening faceoff

Now THIS is old-time hockey!

There's bad blood between the Bruins' David Backes and the Stars' Jamie Benn that goes back a long way, most recently in last spring's Dallas-St. Louis playoff series when Backes was still with the Blues. They met again today -- and the ungodly (hockey) hour of 11:30 a.m. Dallas time -- for a nationally televised game between Backes' new team, the Bruins, and the Stars.

And it didn't take long for the two to renew acquaintances . . .

Pistons to honor Hamilton, who had impact on several Celtics

Pistons to honor Hamilton, who had impact on several Celtics

AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -- The Detroit Pistons will retire the jersey number of former UConn star Rip Hamilton tonight, an instrumental figure in the Pistons’ success in the early 2000s that included an NBA title in 2004.
 
Although Hamilton never played for Boston, his impact can be felt within the Celtics locker room.
 
Boston’s Amir Johnson spent his first four NBA seasons as a teammate of Hamilton's in Detroit.
 
In that time, Johnson acknowledges how many of the positive things folks associate with him come from lessons he learned from Hamilton.
 
“He was so relentless when he ran,” Johnson told CSNNE.com. “I remember working out with him one summer. For him to even get his shot off, he sprints full court, goes back down shooting shots, and he just kept doing this over and over and over again, full court sprinting . . . To see that as a young kid, and at his age, just working hard like that, it was great to see.”
 
James Young grew up in nearby Rochester Hills, Mich., so he watched Hamilton’s scoring prowess up close and personal.
 
And as he continued to evolve as a player, Young would see Hamilton during the summer months while attending Hamilton’s basketball camps.
 
“I was there every year, won MVP a few times,” Young told CSNNE.com. “He’s a great guy, a great player.”
 
And, like Hamilton, Young has a lanky frame for an NBA player, which was among the many reasons Young acknowledged Hamilton as being one of his first significant basketball influences as a youth.
 
“For sure,” Young said. “His mid-range game was crazy, great shooter. He was always consistent.”
 
And that consistency has paid off in the highest honor an NBA franchise can bestow upon a player.
 
“That’s big time,” Johnson said. “He’s a champion, great father, great baller. To have his jersey retired is an honor. To see the success he had in the league, and to see his jersey retired with the greats, it's definitely an honor. I’m glad I’ll be there to see that. Kudos to him. He’s a hard worker. Had a great career. I had my high school jersey retired, but to get your NBA jersey retired, that’s great.”
 
Hamilton played 14 seasons in the NBA, nine of which were with the Pistons. A career 17.1 points per game score, he averaged 18.4 with Detroit and was named an Eastern Conference All-Star three times (2006-2008).
 
Although he is known as one of the greatest mid-range shooters of his era, Hamilton began to expand his range over time. During the 2005-06 season, Hamilton shot 45.8 percent from 3-point range (most of them being corner 3’s), which led the NBA that season.