Edelman, Amendola go full 'luchadores' during Mexico visit

Edelman, Amendola go full 'luchadores' during Mexico visit

Tom Brady's not the only one traveling the globe to promote football.

Two of his receivers, Julian Edelman and Danny Amendola, headed to Mexico City to bring the game to fans there in advance of New England's regular-season matchup with Oakland at Estadio Azteca later this year. 

As part of the trip, Edelman and Amendola hung out with locals and played soccer with kids not far from the stadium where they'll take on the Raiders on Nov. 19.

The pair also briefly dipped their toes into the world of Mexican wrestling, getting a chance to dress as "luchadores." NFL Mexico's Instagram account described the spandex-wearing Patriots as "La Ardilla" (the Squirrel) and "El Zorro" (the Fox).  

Both receivers have been tracking their few days south of the border on their respective social-media accounts. 

Prototypical Patriots: Hansen's size, elusiveness would be a handful

Prototypical Patriots: Hansen's size, elusiveness would be a handful

The Patriots were pretty well-stocked at receiver in 2016, and position coach Chad O'Shea only picked up one of the most explosive players in the league when Brandin Cooks was dealt by New Orleans to New England this offseason.

Still, we know we can't rule anything out. That's why we're going to take a quick look at a handful of the athletic pass-catchers -- both slots and outside-the-numbers types -- in this year's draft class who look like they could make Tom Brady's life a little easier. 

PHIL PERRY'S PROTOTYPICAL PATRIOTS DRAFT PREVIEW

Zay Jones, East Carolina, 6-foot-2, 205 pounds: One of the best receiver prospects in this year's class, Jones' performance at the Senior Bowl should put to rest any concerns that he simply beat up on lower-level competition when he went off for 158 catches and 1,746 yards and eight scores last season. He has the size and athleticism (4.45-second 40-yard dash, 36.5-inch vertical, 133-inch broad jump) to play on the outside, but his quickness would allow him to thrive in the slot as well (4.01-second 20-yard shuttle, 11.17-second 60-yard shuttle). That kind of versatility would make him an ideal fit in New England but he's almost guaranteed to be gone by the time the second round rolls around. 

Cooper Kupp, Eastern Washington, 6-foot-2, 204 pounds: Kupp's long speed (4.62-second 40) may limit him to slot work in the NFL, but that's fine. His ability to run routes is among the best in the draft class, and he showed an uncanny ability to separate even against superior athletes with Washington (8 catches, 145 yards, 3 touchdowns in 2014), Oregon (15 catches, 246 yards, 3 touchdowns in 2015) and at this year's Senior Bowl. Julian Edelman and Danny Amendola won't play forever, and if the Patriots are looking for their slot of the future Kupp would be a good match. 

Chad Hansen, Cal, 6-foot-2, 202 pounds: In terms of his experience running a variety of routes, Hansen is more like an Antithetical Patriot. He aligned almost exclusively out wide and on the right side of Cal's formations, and according to Pro Football Focus 73.6 percent of his targets came on screens (where he was surprisingly elusive after the catch in one-on-one situations), hitches and go routes. Though his numbers at the combine were relatively pedestrian, he's quick for his size (6.74-second three-cone drill, 4.13-second short shuttle) and he plays faster than the numbers would indicate. Plus, he's one of the most coordinated outside receivers in the class. He's excellent at using his frame to high-point passes along the sidelines, and he has good awareness to get his feet down in-bounds. With plenty of room to grow after just one season as a starter with the Bears (he transferred from Idaho State after spending the 2013 season there), Hansen is the kind of work-in-progress prospect who could blossom with a year of seasoning in New England. 

Taywan Taylor, Western Kentucky, 5-foot-11, 203 pounds: Though his timed speed was nothing to write home about (4.5-second 40), Taylor is another player who seemed to play faster than the numbers would indicate. Even if his speed doesn't totally translate from Conference USA to the NFL, which it very well may not, his shiftiness should allow him to create separation at the next level. He ran a 6.57-second three-cone drill, a 4.21-second short shuttle, and he looks like a middle-round selection who could figure into a slot role with the Patriots.

ArDarius Stewart, Alabama, 5-foot-11, 204 pounds: A nice recommendation from Nick Saban wouldn't hurt, but even if Stewart didn't play under Bill Belichick's good friend he'd be featured in this space. Fast enough (4.49-second 40), explosive enough (34-inch vertical, 124-inch broad jump), competitive and physical, Stewart looks like the kind of versatile option that the Patriots could align just about anywhere depending on the matchups. He's a polished route-runner who can beat corners with his hands or head-fakes, and when attacking contested passes he has the balance to hold his own at the moment of truth. An effective blocker -- key in the Patriots system -- and a potential kick-return option, there's not much to nit-pick about his fit in Foxboro. The only questions are a) can the Patriots find room for him? And b) does he fall far enough to land in their laps? NFL.com's Lance Zierlein compares him to Chris Hogan.

Mack Hollins, North Carolina, 6-foot-4, 221 pounds: If you're looking for big-time college production, Hollins probably isn't your guy. Still, his size (33-inch arms, 10.5-inch hands) and explosiveness (120-inch broad jump) give him big-play potential in the NFL. He had 20 touchdowns on 71 touches for the Tar Heels. As far as the Patriots are concerned, what might make Hollins worthy of a mid-to-late round pick is that he was a four-year special teams captain and will provide immediate help on punt and kickoff units.