College Football

COLLEGE FOOTBALL: Pass rush helps sluggish Tennessee outlast UMass, 17-13

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COLLEGE FOOTBALL: Pass rush helps sluggish Tennessee outlast UMass, 17-13

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. - Tennessee coach Butch Jones often follows closer-than-expected victories by saying that he never will apologize for a win.

This time, he had a different postgame approach.

"At the end of the day, it's all about getting the victory, but (that was) just flat-out unacceptable," Jones said Saturday after Tennessee staggered to a 17-13 victory over 27 1/2-point underdog Massachusetts. "The performance is unacceptable. We'll get back to work tonight and correct it and correct our deficiencies."

Tennessee (3-1) was trying to bounce back from a 26-20 loss at No. 20 Florida in which the Vols allowed a tiebreaking 63-yard touchdown pass as time expired. Jones' staff was roasted all week for everything from Tennessee's red-zone play calling to its defensive strategy on the game's final play.

The Vols' performance against UMass (0-5) won't quiet that criticism. Tennessee struggled to put away a winless team that played the entire game without star tight end Adam Breneman and most of the second half without starting quarterback Andrew Ford due to injuries.

"There's no excuse to come out here and play the way we did," Tennessee offensive tackle Brett Kendrick said.

Tennessee was held scoreless for the game's first 25 minutes and final 22 minutes. The sluggish performance amid summer-like conditions resulted in a sterile Neyland Stadium atmosphere. Although the announced attendance was 95,324, there appeared to be approximately 30,000 or so fewer fans than that in the fourth quarter as UMass attempted to rally.

The Vols survived thanks to a pass rush that recorded seven sacks, their highest single-game total since 2008. Tennessee's John Kelly rushed for 101 yards and a touchdown. Brandon Johnson added seven catches for 123 yards for career highs in both categories.

"We played better than them," UMass linebacker Bryton Barr said. "They're a heck of a team, obviously, but just eliminate a couple of mistakes and we're winning that game."

Tennessee overcame two unsportsmanlike conduct penalties, including one on Jones that gave UMass first-and-goal on its lone touchdown drive.

"I'll take full responsibility," Jones said of the penalty. "That's on me. I also think it was a byproduct of huddling our sideline and talking to our team. The official thinks I'm talking to him and then did talk to him and, you know, that's on me. (I was) trying to give our team a spark as well."

UMass threatened to take the lead with less than 10 minutes left when Andy Isabella's 42-yard run put the Minutemen at the Tennessee 38. But the Minutemen went backward from there - thanks in part to a Jonathan Kongbo sack - and punted on fourth-and-16 at the 44.

The Minutemen's next drive stalled after UMass got as far as Tennessee's 45. Tennessee clinched the victory when UMass lost the ball on downs at its own 17 with 22 seconds left.

"I'm proud of the way they played," UMass coach Mark Whipple said. "We wanted to get it to a one-possession game in the fourth quarter, and we did. We just couldn't make the play that we needed to, to get us over the top."

Both teams used backup quarterbacks for part of the second half. UMass' Ross Comis took over for the injured Ford late in the third quarter. Tennessee's Jarrett Guarantano replaced Quinten Dormady late in the third quarter, but Dormady returned after the Vols failed to move the ball on Guarantano's three series.

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Photo of Celtics' 1963 White House visit recalls a simpler time

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Photo of Celtics' 1963 White House visit recalls a simpler time

As the controversy raged Saturday over President Donald Trump's tweet rescinding the White House invitation to Golden State Warriors' star Stephen Curry, a tweeted photo recalling a simpler time for sports team's presidential visits appeared. 

The nostalgic Twitter account @the_60s_at_50 posted a photo from the Celtics' visit to 1600 Pennsylvania Ave and its principal occupant, John F. Kennedy, on Jan. 31, 1963. JFK had invited his hometown NBA team into the Oval Office for what seemed to be a spur-of-the-moment visit.

A newspaper account of the visit was also posted. The defending NBA champion Celtics were in the Washington area to play the Cincinnati Royals at the University of Maryland's Cole Field House that night and had been taking a tour of the White House when Kennedy invited them in. 

All the team members were there except for star center Bill Russell, who, of course, experienced incidents of racism in Boston that were well-documented. However, Russell's absence was blamed on him oversleeping. His teammates said they didn't know they would meet Kennedy on the tour.  

And yes, that's Celtics legend - and CSN's own - Tommy Heinsohn second from right. Coach Red Auerbach is next to the President on the left, Bob Cousy is next to Auerbach and John Havlicek is the first player in the second row on the left.