Son's arrest prompts MLB star to leave team

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Son's arrest prompts MLB star to leave team

From Comcast SportsNet
ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) -- Torii Hunter was placed on the Los Angeles Angels' restricted list Monday after his teenage son was arrested in Texas. The town of Prosper, Texas, issued a news release announcing 17-year-old Darius McClinton-Hunter of neighboring McKinney, Texas, was arrested Monday in a sexual assault case. The release said Prosper police made five arrests after a monthlong investigation of sexual assault of a child, a second-degree felony. Prosper police spokesman Celso Martinez confirmed McClinton-Hunter is Torii Hunter's son. Hunter's family lives in Prosper, a suburb north of Dallas that's home to several prominent athletes including Deion Sanders and Hunter's teammate, reliever LaTroy Hawkins. Angels manager Mike Scioscia said Hunter has left the team, but refused to say how long Hunter will be away from the club. "It's a personal matter," Scioscia said. "We're going to go day-to-day, and we'll just see where it is. That's all I'm going to say." Darius Hunter is one of Torii Hunter's three sons who played on the Prosper High football team last season. All three sons, including Torii Jr. and Monshadrik "Money" Hunter, are considered Division I football prospects, with Torii Jr. considering Stanford and Darius Hunter interested in playing at Oregon, according to his father. Darius Hunter, a receiver last season, reportedly attracted interest and scholarship offers from Texas Tech, SMU and West Virginia, among others. Hunter flew back to California with the Angels on Sunday night from the Dallas-Fort Worth area, where they faced the Rangers last weekend. But Hunter left Angel Stadium several hours before Monday's game against the Oakland Athletics. "This is very tough for a father," Hunter tweeted after leaving Angel Stadium. "Thanks for ur prayers and support. Be Blessed everyone." Hunter sat out Sunday's game, but would have been in the Angels' lineup Monday night, Scioscia said. Mark Trumbo took Hunter's spot in right field for the second straight night. The 36-year-old Hunter is a four-time All-Star, a nine-time Gold Glove winner and the Angels' clubhouse leader and unofficial captain. He's batting .256 with five homers and 15 RBIs this season, but has been in a slump with just two hits in 31 at-bats over Los Angeles' previous nine games before Sunday, including an 0-for-20 skid. The Angels called up Ryan Langerhans to replace Hunter on the roster, but Trumbo and Peter Bourjos are likely to absorb most of Hunter's playing time. Trumbo has played several positions since Albert Pujols took his spot at first base, but the second-year pro still leads the Angels with six homers and 16 RBIs despite playing in just 26 of their 35 games. The speedy Bourjos usually has been left out of the Angels' lineup in recent days, making just three starts since April 29 after beginning the season as Los Angeles' starting center fielder. He was on the bench again Monday, with heralded prospect Mike Trout again playing in center.

Drellich: Devers is a keeper, even with the addition of Nunez

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Drellich: Devers is a keeper, even with the addition of Nunez

BOSTON -- The cherub stays.

There's no way Rafael Devers is headed back to Triple-A before the homestand starts Friday, right, Dave Dombrowski? Not for the newly acquired Eduardo Nunez, who's a fine player but has nowhere near the offensive upside of Devers, the 20-year-old phenom you just rushed to the big leagues.

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You probably weren't really considering sending Devers straight back, were you now, Dave? Sometime in the 3 o'clock hour Eastern time on Wednesday morning (after a 13-inning, 6-5 loss to the Mariners), you did tell reporters in Seattle that you would need to sit down with manager John Farrell to figure out the plan at third base from here.

Likely, you're just making sure your ducks are in a row. That Nunez himself has a chance to shake hands with you, and gets to hear straight from you what he'll be doing.

That's fair. But let's be doubly sure we're on the same page.

As long as something else doesn't happen between now and then -- no other trades for third basemen, no injuries -- Devers must at least platoon at third unless he shows he can't handle it. Nunez bats right, Devers left.

But it wouldn't be crazy to let Devers have the bulk of the playing time, either, and use Nunez to spell Xander Bogaerts and Dustin Pedroia. Or simply have him come off the bench.

Devers didn't look overmatched in his very first big-league game Tuesday night. On the contrary, he was patient at the plate, drawing the walk that started a sixth-inning rally against Felix Hernandez. (King Felix is quite the draw for a someone making his major-league debut, we should note.) He looked like a happy kid, and sounded like one after the game.

"For me it's just going out there and playing my brand of baseball and having fun out there," Devers told reporters through translator Daveson Perez. "That's what I was trying to do and I think I did that."

Devers finished 0-for-4 with a pair of walks, one strikeout and a run scored. He didn't make any errors and looked smooth and quick, his athleticism shining through some baby fat.

Dombrowski spoke during the last homestand about the lack of league-norm production at third base. Nunez can bring that, if nothing more. He is, at a position that's had no certainty, some form of certainty. A stable piece that can help out around the infield and has valuable versatility.

But Nunez is not what the Sox need most: A bopper.

Devers has pop. The chances he blossoms this year are not in his favor because he is the youngest player in the majors. But it would be a most strange and almost cruel choice to call the kid up for two days and then decide you don't need him because of Nunez, who entered Tuesday with the same OPS as Mitch Moreland (.745).

If you're the glass-is-half-full-type, the first four-game losing streak of the season for the Red Sox was numbed by a third-base situation that's been upgraded twofold. Let's assume the Sox know how to best deploy the two from here -- in the big leagues together, until shown a reason to change course.