Singer defends Obama-Hitler analogy

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Singer defends Obama-Hitler analogy

From Comcast SportsNet
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) -- Hank Williams Jr. is about to have his say. Williams' has cut a new song "I'll Keep My ...," calling out "Fox & Friends" and ESPN after an interview last week on the Fox News talk show led to the end of his association with the sports network and "Monday Night Football," long home to his "Are you ready for some football?" theme. He's also scheduled to appear on "The View" and "Hannity" on Tuesday to discuss the uproar that sprung up after he made an analogy that President Barack Obama and House Speaker Rep. John Boehner golfing together was like Nazi leader Adolph Hitler and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu playing a round. ESPN decided to pull Williams' intro from last Monday's "MNF" telecast after the comments and the move became permanent Thursday when both sides said they'd decided to pull the spot. Williams wrote the topical third verse of "I'll Keep My ..." when he woke up Friday morning and he and a group of players laid it down in a Nashville studio by Friday afternoon. It could be on iTunes late Monday or early Tuesday. In the song Williams, son of country music icon Hank Williams, says "Fox & Friends" hosts twisted his words: "So Fox n Friends wanna put me downAsk for my opinionTwist it all around." He finishes the verse: "Well two can play that gotcha game you'll see." Early in the song, he says the U.S. is "going down the drain" and says it's becoming "The United Socialist States of America." He mentions keeping "Fox & Friends" and ESPN out of your home toward the end of the song. Williams' comments last Monday drew unlikely reactions with many commentators and comedians coming to his defense, claiming ESPN was infringing on his right to free speech. His defenders included the left-leaning Whoopi Goldberg and Joy Behar of "The View" and Jon Stewart of "The Daily Show" and on the other side of the political landscape Sarah Palin and Rush Limbaugh. The brouhaha prompted Williams also to start selling "Hank Jr. for President" T-shirts on his website. Williams' theme song has been part of "MNF" since 1989. The song was a version of his hit "All My Rowdy Friends Are Coming Over Tonight" that he altered to match each week's game. He owns the song and all the rights to it, so ESPN will not be able to use it in any way. Instead, the network says it will use an intro featuring Hall of Fame running back Barry Sanders and soul singer Jimmy Scott prior to the Chicago Bears at Detroit Lions game Monday night. The introduction will change each week.

Hernandez has chance at Red Sox opening day roster after Rutledge injury

Hernandez has chance at Red Sox opening day roster after Rutledge injury

Infielder Marco Hernandez may make the Red Sox roster after all.

Fellow infielder Josh Rutledge, the presumptive 25th man on the Red Sox, suffered a left hamstring strain on Tuesday against the Pirates, according to reporters in Florida, including Jason Mastrodonato of the Boston Herald.

If Rutledge isn’t ready for opening day, Hernandez, a left-handed hitter, may have his crack. 

The question is whether the Sox would be comfortable without a right-handed bat to complement both Pablo Sandoval and Mitch Moreland on the corners. Rutledge was going to give the Sox that right-handed look they sought. (When Hanley Ramirez's shoulder will be healthy enough to play first base is unclear, but isn't expected to be too long.)

Neither Rutledge nor Hernandez has played first base in the majors or minors.

A big-league rookie last year, Hernandez has done decently against lefties at the upper levels of the minors, hitting .328 vs. them at Triple-A Pawtucket last season in 67 at-bats. He hit .315 in 54 at-bats at Pawtucket, with a .318 average against them that season in 88 at-bats for Double-A Portland.

Rutledge is a Rule 5 draft pick who has to remain on the major league 25-man roster the whole season or the Sox risk losing him. Placement on the disabled list doesn’t affect his status unless he’s on the disabled list for a very lengthy time.

An alternative option is Steve Selsky, who has first-base experience, but he's already been optioned.

Roger Goodell says he'll be present for Patriots opener at Gillette Stadium

Roger Goodell says he'll be present for Patriots opener at Gillette Stadium

PHOENIX -- Roger Goodell said during a press conference at the league meetings on Tuesday evening that he planned to attend the NFL's "kickoff game" next season, which is scheduled to be hosted by the Patriots at Gillette Stadium in September. 

Goodell has not visited Gillette Stadium since the AFC title game in January of 2015 -- the game during which Deflategate was sparked. Last season he opted to visit Atlanta for the Divisional and Championship rounds of the playoffs in back-to-back weeks. 

On Monday, Robert Kraft was asked if he anticipated Goodell visiting New England for his team's 2017 season-opener. 

"I think I'll let you all ask him that," Kraft said. "Look, he's the commissioner of the league. As we all know, he has the right to go wherever he wishes to go. If he wants to come, he's welcome to come. We're happy we'll be celebrating our fifth banner. He can decide if he wants to be there."

It appears as though he's decided to be there.