Seguin, Marchand take in Beverly Hill and Rodeo Drive

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Seguin, Marchand take in Beverly Hill and Rodeo Drive

EL SEGUNDO, CA The West Coast trips for NHL teams are often eye-opening experiences for hockey players that have never been to that part of the world, and Bruins mischievous due of Brad Marchand and Tyler Seguin took in Beverly Hill and Rodeo Drive on their Friday off-day.

Both were members of the Bruins when they traveled out to Los Angeles last season, of course, and Seguin was actually drafted No. 2 overall at the Staples Center in Los Angeles two years ago.

But theyd never been to the most famous zip code in the United States before this current trip.

Seguin said he did a little bit of clothes shopping in area known for its clothing stores and world famous areas of commerce, and he couldnt help but feel like he was dropped into one of his favorite TV shows.

We did a little bit of shopping and a lot just watching the people around us. Its a whole different world over there, said Seguin, who sounded like he had the full Axel Foley experience in his first time taking in Beverly Hills. The people are all dressed up like theyre straight out of TV show or a movie and there were beautiful women everywhere you looked.

I honestly felt like I was in a scene right out of Entourage. It was a good way to get our minds off hockey for the afternoon, but I was back checking all of the games scores last night when we got back to the hotel.

Seguin, Marchand and the rest of the Bruins were immediately back into business mode for an optional skate at the Toyota Sports Center practice facility home of the Los Angeles Kings on Saturday morning. Theyre off the shopping sprees and starlet-watching, and now fully prepared to wrap up their trip to the West Coast with a strong weekend finish against the Kings and the Ducks.

Malcolm Butler on Instagram: 'Nothing changed but the change'

Malcolm Butler on Instagram: 'Nothing changed but the change'

We haven't heard from cornerback Malcolm Butler as his future as a Patriot hangs in the balance after his visit with the New Orleans Saints last week.

Butler,  a restricted free agent who has yet to sign the $3.91 million tender offered by the Patriots, posted a photo Wednesday on Instagram with the cryptic message "Nothing changed but the change," which happens to be a lyric from a song titled "Could It Be" by rapper Nick Lyon. So, perhaps a change of teams is being referred to.

"Nothing changed but the change" #BLESSED

A post shared by Malcolm CB Butler (@mac_bz) on

More to come...

Goodell: NFL working on a way to reduce commercial breaks during games

Goodell: NFL working on a way to reduce commercial breaks during games

The NFL is acknowledging it has a time-management issue. Games are too long. Commercial are too frequent. And according to an email addressed to NFL fans, Roger Goodell is hoping to change that.

On Wednesday afternoon the commissioner explained the methods by which the league is hoping to improve the fan experience, most of which concern the presentation of games with as few interruptions as possible. 

"On the football side, there are a number of changes we are making to the mechanics and rules of the game to maintain excitement and also improve the consistency of our officiating," Goodell wrote. "For example, next week clubs will vote on a change to centralize replay reviews. Instead of a fixed sideline monitor, we will bring a tablet to the Referee who can review the play in consultation with our officiating headquarters in New York, which has the final decision. This should improve consistency and accuracy of decisions and help speed up the process.

"Regarding game timing, we're going to institute a play clock following the extra point when television does not take a break, and we're considering instituting a play clock after a touchdown. We're also going to standardize the starting of the clock after a runner goes out-of-bounds, and standardize halftime lengths in all games, so we return to the action as quickly as possible. Those are just a few of the elements we are working on to improve the pace of our game."

Goodell also mentioned that the NFL is working with its broadcast partners to reduce the frequency of commercial breaks during games. 

"For example," Goodell wrote, "we know how annoying it is when we come back from a commercial break, kick off, and then cut to a commercial again. I hate that too. Our goal is to eliminate it."

Goodell, team owners and executives will convene in Phoenix next week for the league's annual meetings where discussions about these potential changes could see meaningful progress.