Roger Goodell: The 1 man

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Roger Goodell: The 1 man

Jon Fucile
WickedGoodSports.com

Surprise, surprise! A bunch of greedy millionaires and billionaires couldn't come to an agreement about the amount of money they want and now the NFL has entered a lockout. Fantastic.
Wah wah wah I'm only getting ten million and I want twenty! This is so unfair!

Someone call the Waaaaaaaaah-bulance.

If you recall, NFL commishioner Roger Goodell made a promise that if there was a lockout, he'd reduce his 10 million salary to just one dollar. I guess he underestimated the pettiness that money instills in people because now he's forced to make good on his promise.

Mr. Good Guy Roger Goodell will reportedly keep his word and reduce his salary to a buck in an effort to make himself appear super awesome and be like the common man.

He's one of us now! A common man!

In order to adjust to his new life and see what it is like to be poor, he reportedly started watching Nascar.

His previous lifestyle was expensive though, and that one dollar salary just might not cut it. He may have to collect cans.

Or hit the streets hard and pan handle. You know, get a good honest day's work.

Maybe he'll even do what a bench of med students do and dance their way through the rough times to pay their bills!

Gross.

You know what though? We're not fooled.

Is Roger really this good of a guy? Probably not. We don't know him personally but really, the guy isn't hurting for money. He's likely just trying to deflect some heat from himself by bringing himself down to the level of us "commoners."

You're not fooling anybody pal. You're probably sitting at home throwing money into the air and watching it rain.

All this lockout does is highlight how incredibly greedy everyone involved is. This probably all could've been prevented. But apparently a few extra bucks are more important than entertaining fans or making sure the players who actually sacrifice their bodies get an extra piece of the pie.

Remember when sports was simply about the entertainment? Yeah, neither do we.

WATCH: Bruins' Backes battles with Benn right after opening faceoff

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WATCH: Bruins' Backes battles with Benn right after opening faceoff

Now THIS is old-time hockey!

There's bad blood between the Bruins' David Backes and the Stars' Jamie Benn that goes back a long way, most recently in last spring's Dallas-St. Louis playoff series when Backes was still with the Blues. They met again today -- and the ungodly (hockey) hour of 11:30 a.m. Dallas time -- for a nationally televised game between Backes' new team, the Bruins, and the Stars.

And it didn't take long for the two to renew acquaintances . . .

Pistons to honor Hamilton, who had impact on several Celtics

Pistons to honor Hamilton, who had impact on several Celtics

AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -- The Detroit Pistons will retire the jersey number of former UConn star Rip Hamilton tonight, an instrumental figure in the Pistons’ success in the early 2000s that included an NBA title in 2004.
 
Although Hamilton never played for Boston, his impact can be felt within the Celtics locker room.
 
Boston’s Amir Johnson spent his first four NBA seasons as a teammate of Hamilton's in Detroit.
 
In that time, Johnson acknowledges how many of the positive things folks associate with him come from lessons he learned from Hamilton.
 
“He was so relentless when he ran,” Johnson told CSNNE.com. “I remember working out with him one summer. For him to even get his shot off, he sprints full court, goes back down shooting shots, and he just kept doing this over and over and over again, full court sprinting . . . To see that as a young kid, and at his age, just working hard like that, it was great to see.”
 
James Young grew up in nearby Rochester Hills, Mich., so he watched Hamilton’s scoring prowess up close and personal.
 
And as he continued to evolve as a player, Young would see Hamilton during the summer months while attending Hamilton’s basketball camps.
 
“I was there every year, won MVP a few times,” Young told CSNNE.com. “He’s a great guy, a great player.”
 
And, like Hamilton, Young has a lanky frame for an NBA player, which was among the many reasons Young acknowledged Hamilton as being one of his first significant basketball influences as a youth.
 
“For sure,” Young said. “His mid-range game was crazy, great shooter. He was always consistent.”
 
And that consistency has paid off in the highest honor an NBA franchise can bestow upon a player.
 
“That’s big time,” Johnson said. “He’s a champion, great father, great baller. To have his jersey retired is an honor. To see the success he had in the league, and to see his jersey retired with the greats, it's definitely an honor. I’m glad I’ll be there to see that. Kudos to him. He’s a hard worker. Had a great career. I had my high school jersey retired, but to get your NBA jersey retired, that’s great.”
 
Hamilton played 14 seasons in the NBA, nine of which were with the Pistons. A career 17.1 points per game score, he averaged 18.4 with Detroit and was named an Eastern Conference All-Star three times (2006-2008).
 
Although he is known as one of the greatest mid-range shooters of his era, Hamilton began to expand his range over time. During the 2005-06 season, Hamilton shot 45.8 percent from 3-point range (most of them being corner 3’s), which led the NBA that season.