Reddick's 10th inning single wins it for Sox, 3-2

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Reddick's 10th inning single wins it for Sox, 3-2

By Joe Haggerty
CSNNE.com Bruins Insider Follow @hackswithhaggs

BOSTON It looked like it was going to be one of those nights for the Red Sox and for Josh Reddick, but instead it turned into one of those nights for both team and player.

A Dustin Pedroia sacrifice fly in the bottom of the ninth inning sent things into extra innings, and Reddick busted out of an 0-for-4 evening with a walk-off single in the bottom of the tenth inning that propelled Boston to a 3-2 extra inning victory in 4 hours and 15 minutes of Sunday Night Baseball.

Yankees little guys Eduardo Nunez and Brett Gardner cracked solo home runs for the Yanks and led them to a one-run lead in the bottom of the ninth.

But Mariano Rivera couldnt hold things down for the Yankees at Fenway Park, and that kind of thing is no one-hit wonder.

Gardner appeared to provide the game-winning blast into the Sox bullpen in the top of the seventh inning off Matt Albers, and it was left to the Boston batters to solve Rafael Soriano, Dave Robertson and Rivera over the final three innings.

The victory vaults Boston into sole possession of first place in the division by a single game, and sets up another impending date between the ancient rivals in the Fens at the end of the month.

The pitchers were locked in for the first six innings and each allowed only a single while battling through lineups that sent their pitch counts soaring. Once again Josh Beckett was the picture of pitching brilliance while mixing pitches and holding the Yankees lineup to six hits and a single run in six frames.

Freddy Garcia was every bit as good for the Yankees while surviving with an 88-mph fastball, and dodging jams by pitching around the middle of Bostons lineup. Twice the Sox loaded the bases against the Yankees in the second and sixth innings, but they only managed to plate a single run on an infield single by Marco Scutaro.

Jacoby Ellsbury was greeted by MVP chants when he stepped to the plate in both bases loaded situations, but he ended both rally innings and stranded eight Sox runners on the base paths during the loss. All looked lost until Marco Scutaro capped off a four-hit night with a double in the bottom of the ninth, and set everything into motion in extra innings.

Joe Haggerty can be reached at jhaggerty@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Joe on Twitter at http:twitter.comHackswithHaggs.

McAdam: Amid the champagne flowing, a focus on Farrell’s fight

McAdam: Amid the champagne flowing, a focus on Farrell’s fight

NEW YORK - Scenes from a celebrating clubhouse, late Wednesday night:

*As champagne flowed and was sprayed to every virtually corner of the visitor's clubhouse, plots were being hatched.

Some mischevious players gathered to plot out their plan of attack and select a new victim.

Once all teammates had been targeted, the focus shifted to others -- preferably the nicer dressed visitors.

Principal owner John Henry, dressed in a suit, was spared - both out of decorum, and, one senses, self-preservation. In past years, someone like Kevin Millar might have entertained such a notion, but this group lacks that same sort of bold figure.

Then, finally, the group spied manager John Farrell being interviewed across the way. The group -- mostly pitchers -- assembled and then circled the manager before finally dumping bottle after bottle of champagne on Farrell's head.

But this display went beyond prank. There was a genuine affection for the manager as the surrounding players whooped and hollared and the the bubbly flowed.

"He's a fighter,'' remarked Mookie Betts. "He instilled that in us. You fight to win.''

Torey Lovullo, who managed the team in Farrell's absence last year and has been a close friend for years, was overcome with emotion.

"I told him I loved him,'' Lovullo said. "For what he's done, to come out on the other side health-wise....he's the leader of this team. It's very satisfying for all of us that have been behind him.''

Players messed his hair, patted him on the back, and Farrell, with a huge smile, stood and -- literally -- soaked it in.

For the past few days, Farrell had gone to great lengths to turn the focus away from his personal story -- one that saw him beat back cancer a year ago -- and turn it back to the players.

Hours before the clinching, Farrell had deflected a few questions about his own story, insisting he wasn't the centerpiece to what had taken place.

But for a few minutes Wednesday night, he was.

 

*While there were prominent veterans celebrating a division title — from 40-something David Ortiz and Koji Uehara to team greybeards such as Dustin Pedroia -- it was hard not to notice the number of young players under 26 who form the Red Sox’ foundation.

Betts, Jackie Bradley Jr., Xander Bogaerts, Eduardo Rodriguez, Andrew Benintendi and Yoan Moncada are all young and still improving.

With Ortiz headed to retirement, Uehara eligible for free agency and uncertainty surrounding others, it's clear that the young core will form the nucleus of Red Sox teams for years to come.

The organization's hope is that that same group will help ensure against the up-and-down trajectory of recent seasons -- last, first, last, last and now first again.

"I think the way baseball's going these days,'' Henry told the Boston Herald, "if you don't have good young players, you're in trouble.''

"Looking ahead,'' added Pedroia, "we've got a lot of young players who are just going to get better.''