Red Sox take down Yankees, 9-5

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Red Sox take down Yankees, 9-5

By Sean McAdam
CSNNE.com Red Sox Insider Follow @sean_mcadam

On Tuesday night, the Red Sox left a staggering 16 runners on base. On Wednesday night, they found a solution to their problem: Two-run homers, which clean up after themselves.

The Sox drilled three of them, clubbing the New York Yankees 9-5.

The win re-established Boston's 1 12 game lead in the American League East and improved their record to 11-3 against New York this season.

Jacoby Ellsbury's two-run homer in the three-run sixth provided the winning margin.

David Ortiz and Jason Varitek also added two-run belts for the Red Sox.

The Red Sox had squandered a 4-1 lead in the fourth when the Yanks erupted for a four-run inning against Josh Beckett. The four runs were more than Beckett had allowed in four previous starts, covering 27 innings, against the Yankees this season.

Eric Chavez provided the big blow in the four-run sixth, delivering two runs on a double to right and taking third on Josh Reddick's error, from where he scored on a sacrifice fly, giving the Yanks a 5-4 lead.

But Varitek (three RBI) doubled home Reddick to tie the gamd Ellsbury's homer, an opposite-field shot into the Monster Seats, gave the Sox a lead they wouldn't lose.

Varitek's two-run clout into the home bullpen in the eighth closed out the scoring.

Daniel Bard and Jonathan Papelbon combined to shut out the Yankees over the final two innings.

Sean McAdam can be reached at smcadam@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Sean on Twitter at http:twitter.comsean_mcadam.

McAdam: Ridiculous to think Bradley's streak ended because he hit leadoff

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McAdam: Ridiculous to think Bradley's streak ended because he hit leadoff

BOSTON -- If you think John Farrell's decision to hit Jackie Bradley Jr. leadoff for one night is the reason Bradley's 29-game hit streak came to an end, I've got some swamp land you might be interested in buying.

Such silly talk first surfaced mid-afternoon when the lineup was announced. With Mookie Betts getting his first day off this season, somebody had to hit leadoff. Farrell went with the guy who was leading the league in hitting.

That sounds reasonable. But not to some, who cried that putting Bradley at the top was (take your pick) disrupting Bradley's routine, putting him in a place with which he wasn't familiar, or asking him to change his approach.

Of course, none of those made much sense.

First of all, Thursday night marked the sixth (SIXTH!) different spot that Bradley has hit during the hitting streak. He had hit second, sixth, seventh, eighth and ninth. So the notion that any change was disruptive was absurd.

As for the notion that Bradley would treat his at-bats differently because he was leading off? Also wrong. Bradley's major adjustment since spring training has been being aggressive early in the count. So, do you know how many pitches Bradley saw in four at-bats as the leadoff hitter? Eight.

Does that sound like someone who was being forced to be more patient for the night, or someone changing their approach by working the count more?

Finally, Bradley hit two balls on the screws -- one to the warning track in right, just in front of the bullpen in his first at-bat and another in front of the center field door, some 400 or so feet away, in his third.

Streaks come to an end, even when hitters belt the ball hard. Twice.