Red Sox out-slug the Yankees, 11-6

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Red Sox out-slug the Yankees, 11-6

By SeanMcAdam
CSNNE.com

NEW YORK -- The new Yankee Stadium can be an inviting ballpark for powerful lineups, and for the second night in a row Wednesday, the Red Sox turned it into an offensive shooting gallery.

Scoring in five of the nine innings and belting three home runs, the Red Sox walloped the New York Yankees, 11-6. The win was Boston's seventh win in eight tries this season against its rivals and gave them a one-game lead over the Yankees in the American League League East.

Tim Wakefield and Alfredo Aceves, who were both spot starters last month, took a tag-team approach to the Yankees, with Wakefield starting and going the first 5 13 innings and Aceves following with 2 23 innings of relief.

As was the case in the series opener Tuesday, the Sox got off to a quick start, scoring three times in the top of the first. Two of the runs came on yet another homer by David Ortiz, his fourth in his last eight games.

The Sox pushed their lead to 7-0 with three more runs in the fourth.

The Yankees made things interesting with a solo homer from Alex Rodriguez in the fourth and a two-run double by Derek Jeter in the fifth.

Wakefield tired after 91 pitches in the sixth as the Yanks scored once more but ninth inning homers from Carl Crawford and J.D. Drew provided a cushion.

STAR OF THE GAME: David Ortiz
Ortiz set the tone in the first inning with a two-run bomb into the right field seats, his second homer in as many nights, helping the Red Sox to their second straight 3-run first inning.

The homer was significant, too, since it came a night after New YOrk manager Joe Girardi criticized Ortiz for a bat flip after his homer in the series opener, and seemed to eliminate any suggestion that the Yanks might be seeking retribution.

HONRABLE MENTION: Alfredo Aceves
Returned to the bullpen -- for now, at least -- Aceves once again piggy-backed a starter and finished a game for the Red Sox will multiple relief innings.

Aceves came on in the sixth when Tim Wakefield tired after 91 pitches and lugged the Sox to the finish line, allowing just one run over the final 3 23 innings.

GOAT OF THE GAME: A.J. Burnett
Once again, the Yankees' starter didn't give his team much of a chance. Tuesday night, it was Freddy Garcia, gone in the second inning. Wednesday night, A.J. Burnett was the culprit, lasting into the sixth, but still allowing eight runs, seven of them earned.

The eight runs were a season high for Burnett, who is winless in his last eight career starts against the Red Sox.

TURNING POINT
Just when it seemed like the Yankees were building some momentum, closing to 7-5 with two runners on in the sixth, Aceves got Derek Jeter to hit into an inning-ending, rally-killing double play.

BY THE NUMBERS
After hitting just one homer in his first 44 games, Carl Crawford has hit five homers in his last 15 games.

QUOTE OF NOTE
"I don't care about what Joe Girardi said. I've got almost 370 bombs. I don't want to make a big deal because I bat-flipped (after) one.'' -- David Ortiz, who homered for the second straight night.

Sean McAdam can be reached at smcadam@comcastsportsnet.com.Follow Sean on Twitter at http:twitter.comsean_mcadam

First Impressions from the Red Sox' 9-8 loss to the Tigers

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First Impressions from the Red Sox' 9-8 loss to the Tigers

First Impressions from the Boston Red Sox' 9-8 loss to the Detroit Tigers:

* Steven Wright continues to have problems with the weather.

Recall earlier this season that Wright's worst start of the season came in an outing against Houston, which was played in a non-stop downpour. Unable to properly grip the ball because of the wet conditions, Wright was pounded.

On Tuesday, there wasn't rain in the forecast, but the extreme heat and humidity -- gametime temperature was a steamy 92 degrees -- appeared to have some issues gripping the baseball because of sweat building up on his hand and arm.

Some of the knuckleballs Wright threw were flat with little movement, likely in part because he couldn't "push'' them out of his grip thanks to the slipperiness of the ball.

It's unclear what the Red Sox can do about this going forward, but if Wright has to be so protected against the elements to be successful, then the Sox have a problem.

* The bullpen remains a nightly adventure.

It's never a good thing when your starter can't through the fifth inning. It's even worse when the relievers who are then called upon can't shut the door, either.

Robbie Ross Jr., who has been up-and-down in his effectiveness for much of the year, retired five of the first six hitters he faced.

So far, so good.

But with two out in the seventh and the bases empty, Ross inexplicably lost command. First, he plunked Justin Upton. Then, he allowed a single. Then he issued consecutive walks to the eighth and ninth hitters in the Tigers' lineup, including a bases-loaded free pass to light-hitting Tyler Collins (.184 coming in).

It's that kind of unpredictability that makes it hard to navigate through the opponents batting order in the late innings

 * The drought with the bases loaded ended, but struggles with RISP continue

The Sox got a run-scoring single with the bases full by Dustin Pedroia in the sixth, producing a run, and ending a drought in which the Sox have, time after time, been unable to capitalize with the bases full.

But the situational hitting continues to dog them.

After going 2-for-10 with runners in scoring position Monday night, the Sox were only marginally better (3-for-10) on Tuesday.

Sean McAdam can be followed on Twitter: @Sean_McAdam

Pedro says David Price has shown signs of what it takes to be an ace

Pedro says David Price has shown signs of what it takes to be an ace

Pedro Martinez knows what it takes to be an ace. He also knows what it takes to pitch successfully in Boston.

And he believes David Price is capable of being the former and has the makeup to achieve the latter -- in time.

"I would just say, as a human being, I would say (he) has to make adjustments,'' said Martinez when asked what advice he would give Price. "It's the first year on a team that holds a lot of expectations. For David, it's just a matter of probably understanding how he feels comfortable around the things that he does, what David Price needs for David Price to feel more comfortable and make the adjustment as quick as possible.

"I believe he's capable of it. He's given a lot of signs that he's the ace we all expect. And, to be honest, I think he's going to be alright. It's just a matter of making the adjustment as quickly as possible.''

Whether Price may be trying too hard to justify his landmark $217 million deal, or unsure of how to handle the disappointing results he's provided, Martinez suggested that Price has to be mentally tough.

"Sometimes, it's within you what you can do,'' he said. "I think he has to trust what he can do. I think that probably trusting what he knows and what he's capable of doing would be the biggest key.''

Whatever the reason, Martinez doesn't believe there's a physical explanation for Price's struggles.

"I don't see anything wrong,'' he said. "His velocity is there. He can last eight, nine innings, easily. He's in great shape. He looks good overall, except some games just don't go his way and sometimes it doesn't look like everything (works) for him. But I believe he just has to trust what he is, the presence he has and his knowledge.

"It's up to you sometimes to say, 'Hey I know this. I know this situation, so I'm just going to go approach it.' And that's probably what he needs to do - is just trust who he is, what he knows and the stuff he has.''

When asked if he would approach Price and deliver a message, Martinez was careful.

''I don't want to invade anybody's territory,'' he said. "I would like to be respectful to him and also the coaching staff. I'm part of the organization. I'm here to help. But like I said, the biggest adjustment is the adjustment David Price makes. It's not really what Pedro says, or what Pedro used to do. David Price is David Price; Pedro Martinez is Pedro Martinez.''

Martinez was also asked about Clay Buchholz, who is currently serving a mop-up man in the bullpen.

"Bucky lost a little bit of confidence,'' said Martinez. "That's what it looks like to me. Right now, he doesn't really have a path to follow and I think he's missing (Jon) Lester, big time. He's missing (John) Lackey. He's missing probably relating to someone just like him, who really understands him from back (in the day) -- David Ross, Jason Varitek.

"I think he's mature enough to kind of understand what to do. But some people don't actually have that ability to understand what to do when times of struggles come.''

Finally, Martinez was asked about his reaction to the Red Sox dealing away pitching phenom Anderson Espinoza in the trade for Drew Pomeranz. Martinez had been a vocal supporter of Espinoza and predicted stardom for him.

"The thing is, you have to understand, this team is trying to work for today, for this year. That's the reason you produce those kind of players, so you can have the flexibility to move to different areas,” Martinez said. “I was extremely proud that I was part of the (group) that saw Espinoza from the first time and hopefully now the trade we made is going to end up helping us win the championship.

"And Espinoza probably will feel really proud that, if we win it this year, he was probably the biggest reason.''

Sean McAdam can be followed on Twitter: @Sean_McAdam

Report: Benintendi ‘front man’ in Chris Sale trade talks

Report: Benintendi ‘front man’ in Chris Sale trade talks

Any Red Sox trade discussions the past few weeks have pretty much begun and ended with their top two prospects, second baseman Yoan Moncada and outfielder Andrew Benintendi.

As the Red Sox continue their search for starting pitching, those two names keep coming up. So, naturally, comes a report Tuesday that puts Benintendi at the center of a deal for Chicago White Sox left-handed ace Chris Sale. 

Andrew Benintendi “could be the front man in a multi-player Chris Sale trade if talks progress,” according to Chicago-based mlb.com columnist Phil Rogers. 

With top pitching prospect Anderson Espinoza dealt to the Padres in trade for Drew Pomeranz, the question is, would Red Sox president of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski further deplete his prospect reserve by dealing Benintendi, the 2015 first-round pick out of Arkansas who is hitting .276 with six homers and 36 RBI in 58 games at Double-A Portland? 

The Red Sox' performance is the next six games until the Aug. 1 trade deadline may hold the answer.