Pumping up and winding down with the Sox


Pumping up and winding down with the Sox

By Jessica Camerato
CSNNE.com Follow @JCameratoNBA
The Major League Baseball season is 162 games long -- throw in Spring Training and the playoffs, and the Red Sox could potentially play ball for nearly an entire year. So with all the games, sometimes played consecutively for more than a week at a time, how do players get amped up for every contest? And when the final out is made, how do they wind down from the adrenaline rush they've experienced during the game?

Adrian Gonzalez, David Ortiz, Jonathan Papelbon, Marco Scutaro, and Tim Wakefield told CSNNE.com how they get amped up for and wind down from each game.

Adrian Gonzalez

Adrian Gonzalez heads to the batting cages when he wants to get ready for a game. When its all over, he likes to wind down with his favorite lineup of TV shows or books.

Amped up: I like getting loose in the cage. I really don't like to be too hyped up or too amped up just because I want to be calm and under control when I'm playing. I'm not a guy who wants to run through a wall. So for me, it's just going down to the cage, getting my swings in, and getting my swing right. I'm working on the swing that I want to have that game and just focusing on having a good body balance.

Unwind: For my most part, my wife and I just lay on the couch for a little bit until the adrenaline kicks down a little bit. We love to watch King of Queens, we love Friends, Better With You, and Modern Family. Then I'll go and maybe read a little bit. I'll read Christian books or the Bible.

David Ortiz
Music plays an important role in David Ortiz's approach to a game. Take the Home Run Derby as an example, when he asked for the song to be changed during his at bat.

Amped up: "Im always ready for a game. Ill listen to music. It depends what Im in the mood for -- hip-hop, merengue, some salsa, reggaeton. Music always has those lyrics that get you going."

Unwind: "Once the game is over, its over. I guess Ive been doing it for a long time that Im used to it (laughs)."

Jonathan Papelbon

As the Red Sox closer, Jonathan Papelbon spends an entire game preparing himself for just a few batters. Now in his seventh season, he is still searching for ways to wind down from the rush of recording the final out.

Amped up: I really try to get as amped up as I possibly can, but sometimes too amped is not good, so I try to get as amped up as I can and still be able to focus. Sometimes I just close my eyes and try to focus on myself out there being successful. Ill do that in the bullpen.

Unwind: To be totally honest, Ive tried 100 different things and thats the hardest part of my job -- when I get home trying to wind down and actually go to sleep. Most nights Im looking at three or four in the morning before I really actually calm down.

Marco Scutaro
One of the ways Marco Scutaro gets hyped for his next game is by looking back at his previous successes. And while Adrian Gonzalez prefers watching some lighter television to wind down, Scutaro tunes in to a different genre.

Amped Up: Ill probably listen to music, whatever Papi plays (laughs). I like to listen to music and watch some videos before the game. Sometimes Ill put on a video of all my hits from a series when I was swinging the bat well.

Unwind: I go back home and watch some stuff on my iPad. Ill watch a Colombian series, El Capo. Its about the cartel in Colombia, the drug dealers. I watch it to kill time and make my mind tired to go to sleep.

Tim Wakefield

Tim Wakefield has been pitching in the Big Leagues since 1992. After all these years, he finds the best way to get ready for a game is by sticking with a tried and true routine.

Amped up: I dont try to get any more amped than I already am. I do the same thing I do every day. Just because Im pitching doesnt make it any different. I do the same thing every day, even on the days I pitch. I go out and stretch with the pitchers and play catch and kind of burn off some nervous energy outside.

Unwind: I dont unwind, it takes me a while. I have a 30-minute drive home so that helps a little bit. Its quiet time. But other than that, I just try to go to sleep as quick as possible.

Jessica Camerato is on Twitter at http:twitter.com!JCameratoNBA.

Bradley, Betts, Pedroia are A.L. Gold Glove finalists


Bradley, Betts, Pedroia are A.L. Gold Glove finalists

Jackie Bradley Jr. in center field, Mookie Betts in right and Dustin Pedroia at second base are the Red Sox' finalists for the American League Gold Glove awards.

The Blue Jays’ Kevin Pillar and the Rays’ Kevin Kiermaier are the other A.L. center field finalists. The White Sox’ Adam Eaton and Astros’ George Springer are A.L. right field finalists. Joining Pedroia as second base finalists are the Mariners’ Robinson Cano and Tigers’ Ian Kinsler.

Peoria has won four Gold Gloves. Bradley and Betts have yet to win one.

The full list of finalists is here.  The awards will be presented on Nov. 8 at 8 p.m. on ESPN

The Red Sox sent out a series of tweets backing each player’s candidacy.

Betts is also a front-runner for the American League Most Valuable Player.


Ortiz wins Hank Aaron Award as top hitter in American League


Ortiz wins Hank Aaron Award as top hitter in American League

CLEVELAND -- David Ortiz is heading into retirement with some more hardware.

The Boston Red Sox slugger captured the Hank Aaron Award on Wednesday as the top hitter in the American League this season. Budding Chicago Cubs star Kris Bryant was honored as the top hitter in the National League.

The award was presented before Game 2 of the World Series between the Cubs and Cleveland. It was determined through a combination of fan voting and a panel that includes Aaron and other Hall of Fame players.

The 40-year-old Ortiz hit .315 with 38 home runs, 127 RBIs and 48 doubles in the 20th and final season of his major league career. His 541 career home runs rank 17th all-time.

The 24-year-old Bryant hit .292 with 39 home runs and 102 RBIs while helping the Cubs cruise to the NL Central title and eventually a spot in the World Series. Shortly after being honored, Bryant singled in the first inning for his first Series hit.