Pedroia: I'm healthy and 'ready to go'

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Pedroia: I'm healthy and 'ready to go'

By Sean McAdam
CSNNE.com

FORT MYERS -- Friday morning was a vivid reminder that while a broken foot caused Dustin Pedroia to miss almost half of last season, there was never any damage to his spirit.

Determined, upbeat and filled with more than a little spunk, Pedroia, in his first day at the Player Development Complex, maintained that the foot had healed completely and he expects no complications.

"I feel great . . . ready to go and I'm and excited to be here," said Pedroia.

Pedroia must still do some maintenance on the foot, but said that won't hold him back from having a normal spring training.

"I pretty much have to do my stuff in the training room to get ready," he said, "but I don't think it will be a problem."

Some Red Sox officials had hinted Pedroia might be rested more once the Grapefruit League scheduled begins, but the second baseman didn't anticipate scaling back his workload.

"I haven't talked to manager Terry Francona about anything like that," Pedroia said, "but I don't think that's necessary. Whatever they have planned for me, I'm ready to do."

Pedroia recently revealed that his winter rehab featured some "ups and downs," but Friday, he downplayed that aspect of his recovery.

"What I was trying to say," he said, "was when you have an injury like this, you try to find ways that make you feel right. There are so many different areas of your foot and I have to get my leg back to normal. Some of the things I was trying to do weren't the right things to do.

"But we found a way to make me feel strong and I feel great right now. It was just trying to get everything working together. If one part of my leg isn't firing, then it's going to affect my foot. But we kind of figured out what the problem was and the last three weeks, I felt great."

Pedroia will be excused from the taxing shuttle run which the team will conduct next week to measure fitness, but other than that, will be cleared for all activity.

"I've already taken ground balls, turned double plays, run the bases -- I've done everything," he said. "I'm ready to go . . . My foot's repaired. There's a screw in there holding everything together. It's a ton better. I feel great. There's not going to be any setbacks or anything like that."

In addition to a foot which is mended, Pedroia returns to a Red Sox team which has been upgraded by free agent signings and trades. Informed that new teammate Carl Crawford told USA Today that he can't wait to play with Pedroia, whom he labeled a "little firecracker," Pedroia said: "What a shocker.

"I worked out with Carl for probably three or four years at API in Arizona when I was there. I'm glad he's on our team. It's a pain in the butt playing against him. He's running wild. It's going to be fun playing with him on our side.

"Everyone's real excited. We're fired up. Everyone's healthy. It's going to be fun."

With Crawford and Adrian Gonzalez joining the Red Sox lineup, Pedroia is unsure -- and apparently, unconcerned -- where he's going to hit in the batting order.

"I don't care," he said. "I don't think anyone cares."

Pedroia acknowledge that his patience was tested during his rehab.

"It's been tough," he said. "You try to set little goals, stuff like that. The other day was my last workout and I was kind of excited. I put a lot of hard work in and I'm ready for it to show on the field."

Sean McAdam can be reached at smcadam@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Sean on Twitter at http:twitter.comsean_mcadam

First impressions from Red Sox' 10-3 win over Rockies

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First impressions from Red Sox' 10-3 win over Rockies

BOSTON- First impressions from the Red Sox' 10-3 win over Colorado:

 

Steven Wright is the very picture of consistency.

In nine starts this season, Wright has pitched at least six innings and allowed two earned runs or fewer eight times. In the one start in which he failed to do so, he was pitching in a mini-monsoon and unable to properly grip his signature pitch.

On Wednesday, he battled some early-inning wildness with the knuckler, resulting in two wild pitches and four passed balls, but eventually settled down.

His 4-4 mark hardly represents how well he's pitched. A more telling stat is the 60 2/3 innings he's pitched in nine outings, just shy of seven per game.

 

It could be a costly night for injuries.

Ryan Hanigan left the game after 2 1/2 innings because of illness. Dustin Pedroia came out in the fifth as a precaution after experiencing some tightness in his right hamstring. And Xander Bogaerts jammed his thumb in the eighth.

Let's assume that Hanigan's illness is a temporary thing, and since Bogaerts remained in the game, that, too, seemed minor.

But the Pedroia hamstring is potentially a red flag, since it was that same hamstring that sidelined him for almost half of last season.

 

For the past 19 home games, the Red Sox have averaged more than eight runs per game.

Nineteen games isn't exactly a small sample size. In fact, it's almost exactly one-quarter of the home schedule. To average more than eight runs per game over that long a stretch, covering parts of three different homestands, is pretty remarkable.

 

Blake Swihart's speed is something else.

Swihart hit two triples to the triangle Wednesday night, and on the second, to see him shift into higher gear as he approached second base was really something to see.

It's difficult to think of another catcher -- and yes, I understand that Swihart has been playing left field exclusively of late; but he remains primarily a catcher -- who ran as well as Swihart does.

When the Sox and other independent evaluators remark about Swihart's athleticism, that's one of the things to which they're referring.

 

Buckley: Can we expect Buchholz to be placed on DL soon?

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Buckley: Can we expect Buchholz to be placed on DL soon?

Steve Buckley joins Arbella Early Edition to give his opinion on whether or not he thinks the Red Sox will place Clay Buchholz on the disabled list soon, and if not whether he will lose his spot in the rotation.