Nation STATion: Cinco de Red Sox

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Nation STATion: Cinco de Red Sox

By Bill Chuck
CSNNE.com

Today is Cinco de Mayo, a date observed to celebrate Mexican heritage and pride. So in honor of Alfredo Aceves born in San Luis Colorado, Sonora, Mexico, and Adrian Gonzalez whose parents are Mexican, here's a look at the Red Sox and numero cinco:

Five Red Sox who wore No. 5
Tony Perez 1980-82
George Scott 1966-71
Mike Higgins 1937-38, 55-62 (MGR)
Nomar Garciaparra 1996-2004
Rocco Baldelli 2009
Five Red Sox who wore No. 55
Bob Veale 1972-74
Jeff Suppan 1995-97
Ramiro Mendoza 2003
Lenny DiNardo 2004-06
Ryan Kalish 2010

Five Red Sox who had 55 extra-base hits in a season
Year 2B 3B HR
Todd Walker 2003 38 4 13
Jim Rice 1975 29 4 22
Carlton Fisk 1977 26 3 26
Joe Cronin 1939 33 3 19
Wade Boggs 1990 44 5 6
Five Red Sox who had 55 RBI in a season
Year
Jason Varitek 2006
Johnny Pesky 1948
Johnny Pesky 1946
Rick Ferrell 1936
Eddie Bressoud 1964
Wade Boggs 1984

Five Red Sox who scored 55 runs in a season:
Year
Jason Varitek 2000
Jerry Remy 1981
Brian Daubach 2000
Coco Crisp 2008
Cecil Cooper 1974

Gene Stephens, Candy LaChance, and Clyde Engle all had 55 doubles in their Red Sox careers.

Between 1907 and 1915, Tris Speaker was hit by 55 pitches while playing for the Sox.

Don Buddin grounded into 55 double plays in his Red Sox career.

These five third basemen ("5" when keeping score) hit five homers in a season for the Red Sox:

Player Year
Wade Boggs 1988
Wade Boggs 1983
Dalton Jones 1965
Grady Hatton 1954
Pinky Higgins 1938
Jimmy Collins 1903

You can add Kevin Youkilis to the mix this season as well.

Rick Burleson was caught stealing 55 times in his Sox career.

On 5555, the Sox lost to Detroit, 3-2 (five runs scored).

On 552005, the Sox beat Detroit, 2-1 (Jason Varitek hit his fifth double of the season).

Bill Hall, Tony Conigliaro, Jack Clark, Jose Canseco and Mike Cameron are five former or current Red Sox who struck out five times in a game, but none did it while a Red Sox. The five times a member of the Red Sox struck out five times in a game were by Jason Bay, Ray Jarvis, Phil Plantier and George Scott (who did it twice).

Derek Lowe had 55 losses for the Sox, to go along with 74 wins. No Sox pitcher ever had 55 wins.

David Aardsma, pitching for the Sox in 2008, had a 5.55 ERA.

Gary Peters allowed 55 homers in his Red Sox career from 1970 to 1972.

Ray Culp, who pitched for the Red Sox from 1968-73 had a record of 71-58 with a winning percentage of .550.

Manny Delcarmen allowed 55 hits for the Sox in 2008.

Bob Hefner in 1964 and Mark Clear in 1982 each appeared in 55 games for the Sox.

From 1956-58, Bob Porterfield appeared in 55 games for the Sox.

Clay Buchholz is 31-24 in his 55 decisions.

Finally, in case you are a musical theatre buff, "Damn Yankees," the musical adaptation of the book "The Year the Yankees Lost the Pennant," opened on Broadway on 5555. Not that it matters.

Adios!

Thursday's Red Sox-Angels lineups: Sox kick off road trip with Price

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Thursday's Red Sox-Angels lineups: Sox kick off road trip with Price

The Boston Red Sox send David Price (9-7, 4.51 ERA) to the mound to kick of their long road trip against the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.

The Angels will counter with righty Jered Weaver (8-8, 5.32 ERA).

The lineups:

RED SOX

Mookie Betts RF
Dustin Pedroia 2B
Xander Bogaerts SS
David Ortiz DH
Hanley Ramirez 1B
Jackie Bradley Jr. CF
Travis Shaw 3B
Sandy Leon C
Brock Holt LF

David Price LHP

ANGELS
Yunel Escobar 3B
Kole Calhoun RF
Mike Trout CF
Albert Pujols DH
Jefry Marte 1B
Andrelton Simmons SS
Jett Bandy C
Gregorio Petit LF
Johnny Giavotella 2B

Jered Weaver RHP

McAdam: Poor homestand puts Red Sox on tough road

McAdam: Poor homestand puts Red Sox on tough road

The Red Sox had their chance.

They could have beefed up during the just-completed homestand and taken advantage of the worst team in the American League (Minnesota) and another that was only three games over .500 when it came to town (Detroit).

Instead, the Red Sox were just 2-5 in the last seven games at Fenway, losing ground in the standings to the Orioles and Blue Jays rather than making the race tighter.

That's not to suggest the Red Sox played their way out of contention in the last week. There are better than two months remaining in the season and the schedule isn't yet two-thirds complete.

Moreover, there is no dominant team in the East, and, thus, no one capable of pulling away and leaving the rest of the teams in their wake.

Baltimore and Toronto are flawed, too, as the first 100 or so games of the season have demonstrated.

But what the disappointing homestand means is this: Because they didn't win as much as they should at Fenway in the last week, the Sox will have to make up for that on the road.

As has been talked about ad nauseum in the last week, the schedule is about to become more demanding for the Red Sox. It's bad enough that they're in the middle of a stretch that will see them enjoy one (1) day off in the span of 44 days. Making matters worse is that 41 of the final 63 games are away from home -- including the next 11.

Put another way: The Red Sox have not yet had a three-city road trip this season, but all four of their remaining trips are of the three-city variety, including two that include travel to the West Coast.

The Red Sox have played fairly well on the road (21-19) -- they're one of just four teams in the American League with a winning road record -- but the simple fact remains: It's harder to win on the road than it is at home. And that's before you take into consideration the toll that lengthy road trips can take.

Of the next three road opponents, one has a losing record, and another is just two games over .500. Only the Los Angeles Dodgers, next weekend's interleauge road opponent, are playoff contenders from among that group.

Then again, the Red Sox thought they could roll over the Twins last weekend and came away with a four-game split, so it's difficult to handicap these things.

It should help, too, that the Red Sox are getting healthier.

Junichi Tazawa returned this week, and Craig Kimbrel could be back as early as Monday in Seattle. Chris Young and Josh Rutledge could rejoin them before they head out on their next road swing in mid-August.

With all the talk of the daunting schedule and demanding travel ahead, Dustin Pedroia was having none of it.

"We can play just as well on the road as we have at home,'' said Pedroia. "That stuff (the schedule) is irrelevant.''

Maybe. But one way or another, we're about to find out.

Source: Sox seek smaller pieces, not big names, at trade deadline

Source: Sox seek smaller pieces, not big names, at trade deadline

BOSTON -- According to an N.L. talent evaluator who is familiar with some of the Red Sox ongoing talks with teams leading up to the non-waiver trade deadline, the Sox seem focused on adding a bullpen piece and/or back-end starters.

The need for the former is rather obvious, given the current injuries to Criag Kimbrel and Koji Uehara. The Sox can use some upgrades and another experienced arm to guide them through the final two months.

As for the rotation, it's not a surprise that the Sox aren't serious bidders for more glamorous names like Chris Sale, since that would require them to gut their farm system.

But the team's starter depth is perilous, with only Clay Buchholz in reserve. It makes perfect sense that the Sox would be seeking someone else to help provide them with insurance against further injuries or under-performance.