Mackanin, Alomar, Martinez on Sox' list of candidates

191542.jpg

Mackanin, Alomar, Martinez on Sox' list of candidates

By Sean McAdam
CSNNE.com Red Sox Insider Follow @sean_mcadam
While the issue of whether they have to soon find a new general manager, too, remains unsettled, the Red Sox Tuesday took the first tentative steps to drawing up a list of potential managerial candidates to replace Terry Francona.

Even as, on a parallel track, Red Sox ownership debates whether to grant the Chicago Cubs permission to speak with Theo Epstein about their general manager vacancy, the organization is forging ahead with a managerial search.

None of the "name" candidates -- Joe Torre, Tony La Russa and Bobby Valentine -- are thought to be on the Red Sox' shopping list, as the club seeks a younger candidate, one more agreeable to working with others than a more established, veteran manager.

It's also unlikely that members of Francona's coaching staff, including DeMarlo Hale, will be interviewed. Hale is viewed as a top managerial candidate, but after some of the late-season issues the Red Sox experienced in the clubhouse, it's thought that a fresh start is necessary.

According to baseball sources, some of the candidates being discussed are still involved in the postseason, though one, Tampa Bay Rays bench coach Dave Martinez, saw his club's season come to an end Tuesday afternoon when the Rays were eliminated in the American League Division Series for the second straight October by the Texas Rangers.

Martinez has served as the bench coach under Joe Maddon in Tampa Bay since 2008. In those four years, the Rays won one American League pennant and went to the postseason all four years.

Maddon, it should be noted, was the runnerup for the Red Sox' job in 2003 when the team hired Francona. Maddon is regarded as one of the best and most innovative managers in the game and Martinez has undoubtedly learned from him over the last four seasons.

Philadelphia Phillies bench coach Pete Mackinin is another candidate, though at 60, he's older than any other candidate the Sox have considered.

Mackanin has served as Charlie Manuel's bench coach for the past three seasons, replacing former Red Sox manager Jimy Williams in that role.

Mackanin has also worked as a bench coach for the Pittsburgh Pirates and has managerial experience -- albeit brief -- in the big leagues, having served as interim managers for both the Pirates and Cincinnati Reds.

Another known candidate is Sandy Alomar Jr., the older brother of recent Hall of Fame inductee Roberto Alomar and the son of former major league infielder Sandy Alomar.

Alomar had a long, successful career in the big leagues, spent mostly with the Cleveland Indians. After his career ended, Alomar served two seasons as the New York Mets' catching instructor, before rejoining the Indians as, initially, their first-base coach and more recently, manager Manny Acta's bench coach.

He was on the short list of finalists to manage the Toronto Blue Jays last fall, before losing out to John Farrell.

Tony Pena, currently the New York Yankees' bench coach, has been discussed, but is thought to be less of a candidates than Mackanin, Alomar and Martinez -- among others.

Sean McAdam can be reached at smcadam@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Sean on Twitter at http:twitter.comsean_mcadam.

Thursday's Red Sox-Angels lineups: Sox kick off road trip with Price

red-sox-david-price-062916.jpg

Thursday's Red Sox-Angels lineups: Sox kick off road trip with Price

The Boston Red Sox send David Price (9-7, 4.51 ERA) to the mound to kick of their long road trip against the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.

The Angels will counter with righty Jered Weaver (8-8, 5.32 ERA).

The lineups:

RED SOX

Mookie Betts RF
Dustin Pedroia 2B
Xander Bogaerts SS
David Ortiz DH
Hanley Ramirez 1B
Jackie Bradley Jr. CF
Travis Shaw 3B
Sandy Leon C
Brock Holt LF

David Price LHP

ANGELS
Yunel Escobar 3B
Kole Calhoun RF
Mike Trout CF
Albert Pujols DH
Jefry Marte 1B
Andrelton Simmons SS
Jett Bandy C
Gregorio Petit LF
Johnny Giavotella 2B

Jered Weaver RHP

McAdam: Poor homestand puts Red Sox on tough road

McAdam: Poor homestand puts Red Sox on tough road

The Red Sox had their chance.

They could have beefed up during the just-completed homestand and taken advantage of the worst team in the American League (Minnesota) and another that was only three games over .500 when it came to town (Detroit).

Instead, the Red Sox were just 2-5 in the last seven games at Fenway, losing ground in the standings to the Orioles and Blue Jays rather than making the race tighter.

That's not to suggest the Red Sox played their way out of contention in the last week. There are better than two months remaining in the season and the schedule isn't yet two-thirds complete.

Moreover, there is no dominant team in the East, and, thus, no one capable of pulling away and leaving the rest of the teams in their wake.

Baltimore and Toronto are flawed, too, as the first 100 or so games of the season have demonstrated.

But what the disappointing homestand means is this: Because they didn't win as much as they should at Fenway in the last week, the Sox will have to make up for that on the road.

As has been talked about ad nauseum in the last week, the schedule is about to become more demanding for the Red Sox. It's bad enough that they're in the middle of a stretch that will see them enjoy one (1) day off in the span of 44 days. Making matters worse is that 41 of the final 63 games are away from home -- including the next 11.

Put another way: The Red Sox have not yet had a three-city road trip this season, but all four of their remaining trips are of the three-city variety, including two that include travel to the West Coast.

The Red Sox have played fairly well on the road (21-19) -- they're one of just four teams in the American League with a winning road record -- but the simple fact remains: It's harder to win on the road than it is at home. And that's before you take into consideration the toll that lengthy road trips can take.

Of the next three road opponents, one has a losing record, and another is just two games over .500. Only the Los Angeles Dodgers, next weekend's interleauge road opponent, are playoff contenders from among that group.

Then again, the Red Sox thought they could roll over the Twins last weekend and came away with a four-game split, so it's difficult to handicap these things.

It should help, too, that the Red Sox are getting healthier.

Junichi Tazawa returned this week, and Craig Kimbrel could be back as early as Monday in Seattle. Chris Young and Josh Rutledge could rejoin them before they head out on their next road swing in mid-August.

With all the talk of the daunting schedule and demanding travel ahead, Dustin Pedroia was having none of it.

"We can play just as well on the road as we have at home,'' said Pedroia. "That stuff (the schedule) is irrelevant.''

Maybe. But one way or another, we're about to find out.

Source: Sox seek smaller pieces, not big names, at trade deadline

Source: Sox seek smaller pieces, not big names, at trade deadline

BOSTON -- According to an N.L. talent evaluator who is familiar with some of the Red Sox ongoing talks with teams leading up to the non-waiver trade deadline, the Sox seem focused on adding a bullpen piece and/or back-end starters.

The need for the former is rather obvious, given the current injuries to Criag Kimbrel and Koji Uehara. The Sox can use some upgrades and another experienced arm to guide them through the final two months.

As for the rotation, it's not a surprise that the Sox aren't serious bidders for more glamorous names like Chris Sale, since that would require them to gut their farm system.

But the team's starter depth is perilous, with only Clay Buchholz in reserve. It makes perfect sense that the Sox would be seeking someone else to help provide them with insurance against further injuries or under-performance.