Crawford ready to wear out Boston's bases

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Crawford ready to wear out Boston's bases

By Sean McAdam
CSNNE.com

FORT MYERS, Fla. -- When the Red Sox signed free agent outfielder Carl Crawford to a landmark seven-year, 142 million contract last December, it was an extraordinary investment, the second-largest deal the franchise had ever given.

The Sox were motivated to spend as much as they did because of Crawford's unique skill set, which features virtually unmatched speed and defense.

But surely, it must have been more than a passing thought to Red Sox executives that the commitment would almost be worth it just knowing that the Sox would never again have to watch Crawford torment them as an opponent.

In eight seasons, playing the Red Sox as often as 19 times during the regular season, Crawford wore out the Red Sox, particularly on the bases. Over that time, Crawford successfully stole 62 bases in 66 tries, including 35 steals in a row without being thrown out.

Now, that's someone else's problem.

If you can't beat him, sign him.

"All the things that use to aggravate us when he was in a Tampa uniform,'' said Terry Francona, "hopefully will excite us now that he's in a Red Sox uniform."

Told that Crawford and catcher Jason Varitek had jokingly "buried the hatchet,'' now that they are teammates, Francona cracked: "I still have some animosity. He looks awfully good in our uniform, though. When he walked in today, I said, 'It's amazing how you can hate somebody so much when they were in a different (uniform) and then fall in love with him when he's in your (uniform).''

Indeed, Crawford seemed to save his best for games against the Red Sox. In his rookie season, he hit a walkoff homer off Chad Fox to beat the Sox on Opening Day of 2003, and only last season, stole six bases against them in a single game.

Recalling the six-steal game, Francona said: "It felt like he was going right from first to third, not even (stopping) at second.''

After competing against the Sox for the last eight seasons, the transition from Tampa to Boston is a sizeable one and Crawford may take some time making the adjustment.

"Yesterday,'' said Crawford, "walking into the clubhouse (for the first time), it was new for me. I thought I was ready for it but I still really wasn't. Today, I felt a little more comfortable and I figure as each day goes along, I'll feel comfortable.

"It's a new group of people. I've seen those guys playing on the other side a lot, but it's different when you're actually in the clubhouse with them...I got really comfortable (in Tampa). I knew everything - the little ins-and-outs. Now, I've got to figure everything out again.''

Reminded that his stolen base totals might decline precipitiously because he no longer will get the chance to run against the Red Sox, Crawford blushed some, laughed and said: "I don't think so. I try to get as many as I can every year. That's my goal -- to put pressure on the other team, steal as many bags and get into scoring position.''

He later added that when he saw Varitek recently in Boston, they hugged.

"I let him know, 'I'm on your side now, so you don't have to worry about that anymore,' '' Crawford said.

Later, Varitek told reporters that having Crawford as a teammate would, by definition, extend his career.

Though the Rays didn't have a winning season in their history until 2008, a rivalry between Tampa and Boston developed and grew in recent seasons. It wasn't nearly as intense as the long-standing Red Sox-Yankee rivalry, but it had its moments.

"Over time, we built up a little rivalry,'' said Crawford. "We wanted to beat the Red Sox really bad.''

Crawford's success rate on the bases against the Red Sox almost became a joke. First baseman Kevin Youkilis said earlier this week that Crawford at times told Youkilis when he was going to take off for second, comforted by the knowledge that not even advance warning could stop him from succeeding.

"I don't want to say I told him that,'' said a chuckling Crawford. "Maybe I would say some things to throw him off. It was just a little friendly banter. He knew what I was trying to do and I knew what he was trying to do.''

Now, Crawford will be Youkilis' teammate, trying to beat the Rays the way he once tried to beat the Red Sox. It won't take long for Crawford to meet up with his former team -- the Rays come to Boston in mid-April for the second home series of the season.

"It's going to be fun,'' he said. "It's going to be highly competitive because I know that they're going to try to beat us and we're going to do the same. It should (make for) some interesting games.''

Now, with one twist: Let the other team worry about Carl Crawford.

Sean McAdam can be reached at smcadam@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Sean on Twitter at http:twitter.comsean_mcadam

Pomeranz 'pretty comfortable' with potential move to bullpen

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Pomeranz 'pretty comfortable' with potential move to bullpen

NEW YORK -- If Drew Pomeranz is going to be part of the Red Sox' postseason plans, the team will likely have a better idea about that question by Thursday afternoon.

Pomeranz, who was scratched from his final scheduled start on Thursday because of soreness in his left forearm and general concern about his 2016 workload, will throw a 30-35 pitch bullpen.

If he responds well, he could then see some relief action over the final weekend at Fenway to determine his readiness for the playoffs.

"Before we even begin to map out a potential relief appearance over the weekend,'' said John Farrell, "we've got to get through that next step.''

Pomeranz pitched well in his last start at Tropicana Field over the weekend, but has been dealing with some discomfort in his forearm.

"I've had some soreness here, late in the year,'' Pomeranz said. "I've thrown more innings than I have ever (before), so we kind of sat down and talked about the best course of action the rest of the way.''

Pomeranz described what he felt as "just some soreness, probably from never covering this time of the year. It's a spot I've never been in before. We just decided the best thing to do was not making this last start and talk about maybe sliding into the bullpen.''

The lefty is no stranger to the bullpen, having pitched there as recently as last season while with Oakland.

"I've had the benefit of doing pretty much everything (in terms of roles),'' he said. "I'm pretty comfortable in any situation. If they see me helping there, obviously, that's where I want to be. But I don't know if it's a sure thing. We'll have to see how it goes.''

Meanwhile, another sidelined starter, Steven Wright, is expected to rejoin the team in Boston Friday. Wright threw a bullpen off the mound earlier this week in Fort Myers as he attempts to come back from inflammation in his shoulder.

 

Wednesday's Red Sox-Yankees lineups: Second try at clinching A.L. East

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Wednesday's Red Sox-Yankees lineups: Second try at clinching A.L. East

The Red Sox try again to nail down the A.L. East crown tonight, sending Clay Buchholz to the mound against the Yankees while needed just one victory -- or one Toronto defeat -- to clinch the division.

Tonight's lineups:

RED SOX:
Dustin Pedroia 2B
Xander Bogaerts SS
David Ortiz DH
Mookie Betts RF
Hanley Ramirez 1B
Jackie Bradley Jr. CF
Brock Holt 3B
Andrew Benintendi LF
Sandy Leon C
----
Clay Buchholz P

YANKEES:
Brett Gardner LF
Jacoby Ellsbury CF
Gary Sanchez C
Brian McCann DH
Starlin Castro 2B
Didi Gregorious SS
Mark Texeira 1B
Chase Headley 3B
Mason Williams RF
----
Bryan Mitchell P