Beckett returns to rotation Friday vs. Jays

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Beckett returns to rotation Friday vs. Jays

By Maureen Mullen
CSNNE.com Follow @maureenamullen
BOSTON Manager Terry Francona has set his rotation for the four-game series against the Rays beginning Thursday at Fenway Park and Josh Beckett has been penciled in to start for the first time since spraining his ankle on Sep. 5.

Right-hander Kyle Weiland will start the opener, opposed by righty Jeremy Hellickson. Beckett will start Friday, facing righty James Shields. Jon Lester will pitch Saturday against right-hander Jeff Niemann. In the finale on Sunday, Tim Wakefield will pitch against lefty David Price.

John Lackey is scheduled to pitch one of the games in Mondays doubleheader against the Orioles at Fenway.

The nice thing, because we have a lot of pitchers, its not disturbing that maybe you start a guy that can't go deep or maybe you dont plan on going deep. So well see, Francona said.

Francona opted for Weiland over lefty Andrew Miller, believing a righty would give his team a better chance.

I think we felt with the righty against them, he had a real good bullpen session, Francona said. I just think the other day down in Tampa those were tough circumstances for Weiland playing against them and he got through his first inning going four innings in a 6-5 loss. I just think he can rise to the occasion and give us a chance to win. I don't doubt Andrew would do the same thing.

David Ortiz was out of the lineup again Wednesday. Francona said the DH, who was scratched before his first at-bat Tuesday, is sore but moving better. Francona would only use Ortiz to pinch-hit if Ortiz felt up to it.

If he was OK, we certainly could, Francona said. I dont know that he is, though. If you see him hitting, you know he felt better.

There is still no timetable on a return to the rotation for lefty Erik Bedard, who has been limited by knee and lat ailments.

I think he feels once he feels good enough, he can pitch, which is a little unique, Francona said. Saying that, he played catch yesterday. That was kind of the firstand hes going to do it again today. So I dont know how close we are to having him pitch. Wed love for him to pitch. We dont want to rush him to pitch because thats not going to help anybody. So we just take it day by day and see if hes ready.

We know where were at. We need to win games but we also dont want to make decisions based on urgency where we end up hurting him as opposed to helping him.

Francona on the impact of having Jacoby Ellsbury and Dustin Pedroia, both 20-home run, 20-stolen base offensive threats in his lineup:

The majority of the year theyre hitting first or second. The fact that they can help us win so many different ways, whether its hitting the ball out of the ballpark, steal a base, defensively, extra-base hits, it speaks for itself. I think people look at Jacoby and certainly see the athleticism. With Pedey I think you have to watch him and now certainly his reputation precedes him but because hes a very similar player.

It is the first time the Sox have had two 2020 players in one season.

Francona, who is not a fan of expanded rosters at this time in the season, also sees their value, particularly on days such as Mondays doubleheader.

Im glad we have extra pitchers but I dont agree with the rule, he said. I dont think its fair when you play 25 all year and all of a sudden one team might play with 35 and one will play with 30. I do think that every day you have to submit a roster. Im thrilled we have extra pitching but I still dont think its fair.

I just think it would probably make sense. Some uniformity is probably good.

Francona, decidedly not a hockey fan, is an advocate of a hockey-type system: 40 players on the roster with 25 chosen for each game.

Maureen Mullen is on Twitter at http:twitter.commaureenamullen.

Sandoval: I got lazy after signing big contract with Red Sox

Sandoval: I got lazy after signing big contract with Red Sox

The Pablo Sandoval redemption tour is underway as the former World Series MVP tries to revive his career after two disastrous seasons with the Red Sox organization.

In an interview with ESPN Deportes, he admits to being “complacent” during his first two seasons in Boston after signing a five-year, $95 million deal. 

"My career had fallen into an abyss because I was so complacent with things that I had already accomplished," Sandoval said. "I did not work hard in order to achieve more and to remain at the level of the player that I am and that I can be."

After dealing Travis Shaw to the Brewers, Sandoval is expected to be the Red Sox primary third baseman in 2017.

"I am not taking anything for granted," he said. "I am here to work hard. I'm not thinking about the position or not. I am starting from scratch, and I am here to show what I can do on the field."

The 30-year-old says he’s following a “really strict routine” this offseason, and it shows. In a recent photo, Sandoval appears noticeably thinner. Sandoval says his wife giving birth to “Baby Panda” has served as inspiration.

"Watching 'Baby Panda' grow up and that he gets the opportunity to see his father play in the majors for seven, eight more years, to get back to the success I had, that's my motivation every day," Sandoval said. "The people that I surround myself with now and my family, they are the key to my success. This has been a life lesson."

Tanguay: Could Red Sox ownership be going for it now, then sell the team?

Tanguay: Could Red Sox ownership be going for it now, then sell the team?

Could John Henry sell ownership of the Boston Red Sox anytime soon, or does he want to keep winning?  Shaughnessy, Merloni, and Tanguay debate.