A.L. East previews: Blue Jays

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A.L. East previews: Blue Jays

By SeanMcAdam
CSNNE.com

It's been almost a generation since the Toronto Blue Jays were relevant in the American League East. The Jays, bumping up against the division's glass ceiling, haven't been to the postseason since winning their second of two straight World Series titles in 1993.

But there, finally, may be some reason for optimism. The Jays have a new management team in place -- second-year GM Alex Anthopoulos and rookie manager John Farrell -- some flexibility in their payroll and a promising stockpile of young players.

With four winning seasons in the last five, the Jays are, if nothing else, competitive again.

Three things that have to go right:

1) Jose Bautista must come close to his power numbers from 2010, when he led all major leaguers with 54 homers.
The Jays' lineup otherwise lacks much punch, making it essential that Bautista once again carry the production load.

2) The Jays must invest the more than 80 million they saved on Vernon Wells' salary wisely.
The deal happened too late this offseason to impact the Jays' winter moves, but that's probably a good thing since the Jays aren't ready to contend -- yet.

3) Ricky Romero and Brandon Morrow must be more consistent and develop into front-line starters.
Romero has won 27 games over the last two seasons, but can be inconsistent.

Three things that can't go wrong:

1) Bautista can't be yanked back-and-forth between third base and the outfield, as he was last year.
He needs to play one position and remain there.

2) Aaron Hill can't be as inconsistent as he's been.
The 2009 season (36 homers, 108 RBI) looked like his breakout year before he regressed and hit only .205 with just 68 RBI last year.

3) Travis Snider and Adam Lind can't be stalled in their development.
With Wells gone, the Jays lineup is in need of more run producers to give their lineup depth.

Sean McAdam can be reached at smcadam@comcastsportsnet.com.FollowSean on Twitter at http:twitter.comsean_mcadam

Quotes, notes and stars: Ortiz the oldest to hit 30 home runs in a season

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Quotes, notes and stars: Ortiz the oldest to hit 30 home runs in a season

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- Quotes, notes and stars from the Red Sox' 4-3 loss to the Tampa Bay Rays:

QUOTES:

"It's one of those freak things. You don't plan on it happening, but it's one of those things. So we'll just see what the results say and move on from there.'' - Andrew Benintendi on his knee injury.

"That's kind of a routine 3-1 play. Unfortunately, it comes at a time when you've got two outs and a guy on the move. But that's a routine play.'' - John Farrell on the deciding play in which Heath Hembree couldn't hold onto the ball at first.

"I felt good. I felt strong.I felt good out there the whole game.'' - Rick Porcello, asked how he felt going back out for the eighth inning.

"I think everybody in the ballpark knew that that ball was leaving.'' - Porcello, on the hanging curveball to Evan Longoria.

 

NOTES:

* The loss snapped a five-game winning streak against the Rays for the Red Sox.

* Three of the four Red Sox walk-off losses this season have occurred because of errors.

* The homer by Evan Longoria was his first off Rick Porcello in 40 career at-bats.

* Rick Porcello has now pitched seven innings or more in six straight starts, the longest run for a Red Sox starter since John Lackey did it in 2013.

* David Ortiz is now the oldest player to ever hit 30 homers in a season

* Ortiz has now reached the 30-homer, 100-RBI level 10 times with the Red Sox, including the last four years in a row.

* The loss was the first of Heath Hembree's career, in his 67th major league appearance.

* Dustin Pedroia tied a career high with two stolen bases, the 12th time he's swiped two bases in the same game.

 

STARS:

1) Evan Longoria

The Rays were down to their final five outs when Longoria struck, hitting a game-tying homer off Rick Porcello.

2) Brad Miller

Miller's two-run double in the third enabled the Rays to stay close until Longoria's homer tied things up five innings later.

3) Rick Porcello

Porcello gave the Sox length and was brilliant in getting out of some early jams before settling in through the middle innings.

 

Shaughnessy: Everything Farrell does blows up in his face, particularly in 8th inning

Shaughnessy: Everything Farrell does blows up in his face, particularly in 8th inning

Dan Shaughnessy joins Sports Tonight to discuss Rick Porcello giving up a game-tying homerun in the 8th, and explains why John Farrell has been very unlucky with any decision he makes.