1-2-3 Inning: Alfredo Aceves


1-2-3 Inning: Alfredo Aceves

By Jessica Camerato
CSNNE.com Follow @JCameratoNBA
Welcome to the debut of 1-2-3 Inning, a step inside the Boston Red Sox bullpen and a look at the individuals who make up this cohesive unit. First up, Alfredo Aceves.

The 29-year-old right-handed pitcher joined the Red Sox this season after playing the previous three seasons for the New York Yankees. Aceves has embraced his role in the Red Sox pitching staff, whether in the starting rotation or the bullpen (8-1, 2 SV, 3.02 ERA). In this edition of 1-2-3 Inning, he talked to CSNNE.com about family values, the development of his fastball, and a career aspiration you may not have expected.

1. Aceves grew up in a baseball family his father, Alfredo, was a first baseman in the Mexican League and his brother, Jonathan, played in the Chicago White Sox and Florida Marlins systems. But it was just that family that was the foundation of his childhood. When asked what his life was like growing up in Sonora, Mexico, Aceves, one of his most vivid memories had nothing to do with sports.

It was great. I grew up in the middle class. My house was a small house, and I grew up with my brother and sister, doing whatever my father said. I went to school, did my homework in the afternoon, and then I waited for my father to see whats happening and whats going on. On Fridays, I waited until he came with the food, so we helped him to put the bags from the truck in the house. He crossed the border to work all the time in the United States, so he went to Walmart or whatever and he drove back. When he got home, me and my brother went out and said, Father, did you bring food today? He said, Yeah yeah, so we grabbed the boxes and put them inside to help him. He was a carpenter, he was a baseball player, and he also worked in the field for a couple of years. With my father, I had to be a good son and honor him and my mother.

2. There was a period of time growing up when Aceves lost interest in baseball and turned to basketball, soccer, and volleyball instead. When he got asked to join a new baseball team in school, though, he began playing again and moved to the mound. After overcoming his frustrations, Aceves found his speed.

They said they were going to start a baseball team and asked if I wanted to play. I was playing outfield and then the coach said, Jump on the mound. I didnt like to throw hard, like a fastball, and give up a hit. I was like, Why? Im throwing as hard as I can and I couldnt get outs. I didnt know why. So I started to work. I had to wait every Sunday to play again. Work hard Monday to Friday and let it go on Sundays. One time I was throwing 76 MPH fastballs, that was my highest. Then I started to work out. 15 days later, I was 79. 15 more days, 81. 15 more days, 84. 15 more days, I think 86. In a month, 91. So in a period of three months, I went from 76 to 91. I got stuck on 91 for five years. Now, Im 29 and Im throwing 96.

3. As a student at CBTIS 33 (Centro de Bachillerato Tecnolgico Industrial y de Servicios), Aceves had career aspirations outside of baseball. What he wanted to pursue, however, may surprise you.

I studied laboratorio (science). I liked things having to do with the hospital. I wanted to be a dentist. I think its good to repair teeth for people. I think I could be a good dentist.

Jessica Camerato is on Twitter at http:twitter.com!JCameratoNBA.

Bradley, Betts, Pedroia are A.L. Gold Glove finalists


Bradley, Betts, Pedroia are A.L. Gold Glove finalists

Jackie Bradley Jr. in center field, Mookie Betts in right and Dustin Pedroia at second base are the Red Sox' finalists for the American League Gold Glove awards.

The Blue Jays’ Kevin Pillar and the Rays’ Kevin Kiermaier are the other A.L. center field finalists. The White Sox’ Adam Eaton and Astros’ George Springer are A.L. right field finalists. Joining Pedroia as second base finalists are the Mariners’ Robinson Cano and Tigers’ Ian Kinsler.

Peoria has won four Gold Gloves. Bradley and Betts have yet to win one.

The full list of finalists is here.  The awards will be presented on Nov. 8 at 8 p.m. on ESPN

The Red Sox sent out a series of tweets backing each player’s candidacy.

Betts is also a front-runner for the American League Most Valuable Player.


Ortiz wins Hank Aaron Award as top hitter in American League


Ortiz wins Hank Aaron Award as top hitter in American League

CLEVELAND -- David Ortiz is heading into retirement with some more hardware.

The Boston Red Sox slugger captured the Hank Aaron Award on Wednesday as the top hitter in the American League this season. Budding Chicago Cubs star Kris Bryant was honored as the top hitter in the National League.

The award was presented before Game 2 of the World Series between the Cubs and Cleveland. It was determined through a combination of fan voting and a panel that includes Aaron and other Hall of Fame players.

The 40-year-old Ortiz hit .315 with 38 home runs, 127 RBIs and 48 doubles in the 20th and final season of his major league career. His 541 career home runs rank 17th all-time.

The 24-year-old Bryant hit .292 with 39 home runs and 102 RBIs while helping the Cubs cruise to the NL Central title and eventually a spot in the World Series. Shortly after being honored, Bryant singled in the first inning for his first Series hit.