Record-tying defeat for WNBA team

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Record-tying defeat for WNBA team

From Comcast SportsNet Monday, August 15, 2011
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) -- Two teams headed in different directions made history on Sunday night, yet neither head coach was happy at the end. Seimone Augustus scored 16 points and the Minnesota Lynx handed the Tulsa Shock their WNBA record-tying 17th straight loss with an 82-54 victory. In a matchup of the teams with the best and worst records in the league, the Lynx (18-5) won their 11th in 12 games, while Tulsa fell to 1-22. The Shock will try to avoid setting a new record for consecutive losses when they face the Los Angeles Sparks at home next Sunday. Tulsa is tied with the Atlanta Dream, who lost the first 17 games of their inaugural 2008 season. Lindsay Whalen chipped in 12 points and nine assists for Minnesota. Sheryl Swoopes scored nine points for Tulsa, whose interim head coach, Teresa Edwards, coached her first game since she was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame on Friday. Edwards said she's still trying to find the right buttons to push since taking over when Nolan Richardson resigned last month. "It's just not a time to beat them up, it's not a time to be sad," said Edwards, whose team has lost 12 straight games since Richardson's resignation. "I've got to let them be who they are and try to just instill the most important things and be prepared for it game in and game out in hopes that I find a different tactic here to spark some growth." Minnesota matched its franchise record for victories in a season and moved one step closer to its first playoff appearance in seven years. Any combination of four Lynx wins or Los Angeles losses will put Minnesota in the playoffs. "We're a team that's striving for perfection," said Lynx coach Cheryl Reeve. "We're carrying the label of the best team in the league. With that goes a lot of responsibility every time you step on the court to play great and be the great players that they are." The Lynx shot 47.8 percent and went 13 of 20 on free throws, but Reeve was disappointed in the energy the starting five showed while trying to build on a 15-point halftime lead. "We started the (third) quarter with the ball and we turned it over. The next possession we fouled and it just kind of continued from there," Reeve said. "That group, with the exception of (Lindsay Whalen), I just didn't think played the way we had hoped coming out of the locker room." Minnesota's reserves combined for 31 points and played nearly 40 percent of the team's minutes, giving their veteran starters some much-needed rest. Maya Moore, Candice Wiggins, Jessica Adair and Monica Wright each scored nine points, and All-Star forward Rebekkah Brunson added eight points and six rebounds. After playing for four years at UConn, Moore said she understands Reeve's mentality and that she's trying to push her players to biggger things than merely winning in the regular season. "I'm very used to that mindset of not playing to the scoreboard. It's about the quality of play," Moore said. "There's just some things we have to tighten up, just continuing to stay focused every possession. That's what it's going to take to win a championship." While the Lynx have never won more than 18 games in a season, much less a playoff series, a recent nine-game winning streak showed they're clearly title contenders. "We've been thinking about a championship since the first day of training camp, honestly. But getting to a championship -- there's steps to it," Wiggins said. "It's not really a matter of getting ahead of ourselves. This is reality, so we have to be thinking of a championship. But at the same time you have to be thinking about what's right ahead of us."

Price turns in encouraging effort in first 2017 start

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Price turns in encouraging effort in first 2017 start

CHICAGO — It’s a start, literally and figuratively.

David Price showed some great velocity in his 2017 Red Sox debut Monday afternoon, hitting 97 mph -- heat he didn’t have last year. At times, the pitcher the Sox badly need to return to form flashed high-level effectiveness as well.

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What everyone expected would be off in Price's first start back, his command, was indeed shaky, considering he allowed more runs (three) than hits (two). But he wasn’t expected to be in tip-top form, and he did a decent job overall.

Price's five-inning, three-run performance against the White Sox came almost exactly three months after he first felt elbow soreness during spring training. The lefty exited with the Red Sox ahead 4-3, though he lost the chance at his first 2017 victory when Chicago scored twice off Matt Barnes in the seventh and pulled out a 5-4 victory.

All three runs off Price scored on a Melky Cabrera homer in the third inning, which put the White Sox ahead 3-1 at the time. Price walked only two batters on the day, but they happened to be the two hitters in front of Cabrera.

The walk started with the No. 9 hitter, Adam Engel. Tim Anderson, who had drawn just four walks in 181 plate appearances entering the day, got a free pass as well.

But besides the Cabrera homer on a first-pitch fastball that was middle-in, the only other hit Price allowed was a shallow bloop single to center field.

Price finished with four strikeouts, including the first batter he faced on the day, Anderson.

His command issues were nonetheless clear. Price hit two batters to begin his final frame, setting up a fine play for Deven Marrero to record a force out at second before Xander Bogaerts started a inning-ending double play with a fantastic dive, bailing Price out of the first-and-third jam with one out.

With 88 pitches and 58 strikes, Price was more efficient than he was in two rehab outings at Triple-A Pawtucket, and he didn’t get rocked. But he also wasn’t as efficient as the Red Sox will need him to be.

Price was pitching in a calm, pleasant environment (clear skies, temperatures in the 70s, low humidity) that might actually have been more comfortable than the colder clime Price faced in Pawtucket -- where both the fans and temperatures were chilly.

The Red Sox were aggressive bringing Price back so quickly, and set themselves up for a second guess if something went wrong. But Price preserved the second of two leads his offense gave him and didn’t let the game get out of hand. After the Cabrera homer put the White Sox up two, the Red Sox answered immediately in the top of the fourth to tie at 3-3.

The argument that Price did better than anyone else would have in his place is a fair one, considering John Farrell and Co. slated Price to pitch Monday before they watched Brian Johnson’s complete-game shutout.

The bigger question was always about what was best for Price’s future, and Monday looks like something he can build on. He may have benefited from the adrenaline of being back in the majors.

Pedroia lifted in second inning after hurting wrist in collision

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Pedroia lifted in second inning after hurting wrist in collision

CHICAGO -- Injury scares are finding Dustin Pedroia in all the wrong places.

The Red Sox second baseman was pulled in the second inning Monday afternoon against the White Sox because of a left wrist sprain, an injury he seemed to suffer on a collision running to first base in the top of the first inning.

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He and White Sox first baseman Jose Abreu converged on the bag at the same time on a grounder to Abreu, and Pedroia tumbled over Abreu

Pedroia had season-ending surgery on the wrist in September 2014, addressing a tendon issue. Pedroia had surgery on his left knee this year, and missed time after Manny Machado's slide caught him in that leg in April.

Pedroia during the last homestand was pulled as a precaution because of concern for that leg.

Josh Rutledge took over for Pedroia at second base.