Pierce on Garnett: 'I tell him all the time he should shoot more 3s'

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Pierce on Garnett: 'I tell him all the time he should shoot more 3s'

BOSTON When you beat a team by 36 points, chances are pretty good that there will be a few out-of-the-ordinary scoring moments.

Near the end of the second quarter in Boston's 100-64 win over Toronto, Kevin Garnett had the ball with just a few ticks on the clock.

So he did what seemingly came natural -- he raised up for a 3-pointer and knocked it down, the kind of shot that we seldom see Garnett take, let alone make.

It was just his fifth made 3-pointer -- out of 30 attempts -- since joining the Celtics in 2007.

That means Garnett has connected on just 16.7 percent of his 3s with the Celtics.

He had a higher 3-point percentage in Minnesota, but not that much higher.

In his 12 seasons with the Timberwolves, Garnett shot 28.8 percent on 3s.

So as you can imagine, Doc Rivers isn't quite ready to see Garnett launching 3s like Ray Allen or Paul Pierce.

When asked about Garnett's 3-point shooting and how he may look to shoot more in the future, Rivers quipped, "it's the worst thing that could have happened."

It's not that unusual for Garnett to pull up for 3s in practice -- and actually make them.

And if you look at his 16-plus seasons in the NBA, Garnett took a decent number of 3s every year while in Minnesota.

"I tell him all the time he should shoot more 3s," said Paul Pierce. "I see him take 3s all the time in practice and he knocks them down consistently. He shoots a lot of his long range two-pointers are almost near the (three-point line) so it's only one step back. He has that kind of range."

Red Sox score 7 in 7th to beat Rangers 9-4

Red Sox score 7 in 7th to beat Rangers 9-4

BOSTON (AP)  Dustin Pedroia waved home the tiebreaking run on a wild pitch, then singled in two more during Boston's seven-run seventh inning on Wednesday night and the Red Sox beat the Texas Rangers 9-4 for their third straight victory.

Chris Sale (5-2) struck out six, falling short in his attempt to become the first pitcher in baseball's modern era to strike out at least 10 batters in nine straight games in one season. He allowed three earned runs, six hits and a walk in 7 1/3 innings and received more runs of support in the seventh inning alone than in any previous game this season.

Sam Dyson (1-5) faced seven batters in relief of Martin Perez and gave up four hits, three walks - two intentional - and a wild pitch without retiring a batter. Mike Napoli homered for Texas, which has lost three of four to follow a 10-game winning streak.