Penn St. report on Sandusky due out Thursday

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Penn St. report on Sandusky due out Thursday

From Comcast SportsNet
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. (AP) -- The team brought in by Penn State to investigate how the university handled molestation accusations against former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky will release its highly anticipated report Thursday, with the school's reputation and future direction hanging in the balance. The university trustees who paid for the probe, led by former FBI agent and federal judge Louis Freeh, will pore through it Thursday to see what it says about university employees, recommendations for policy changes and even their own knowledge about rumors Sandusky had abused children on campus. Penn State alumni, college football fans and the family of Sandusky's former boss Joe Paterno will look to see if it sheds new light on Paterno's actions, particularly after a graduate assistant complained to him in 2001 about Sandusky showering in a team locker room with a boy. School administrators Gary Schultz and Tim Curley, awaiting trial on charges they lied to the Sandusky grand jury and didn't properly report child abuse, will find out whether Freeh's investigators uncovered anything that might help -- or hurt -- their criminal defense. And former Penn State president Graham Spanier, who has not been charged with any crime, could discover whether emails or other records disclose more about his role. Lawyers for the young men who testified against Sandusky, and others planning civil lawsuits, will be reading the report closely for what it might mean regarding litigation. "I'm going to be looking for what we believe will be full and complete disclosure," said Harrisburg lawyer Ben Andreozzi, who represents the young man described as Victim 4 in court records. "It's going to be convenient for the university to release certain information but to hold back on some of the details concerning potential information that could expose them to liability." Andreozzi said he also represents four other young men and is evaluating their potential civil claims related to the Sandusky scandal. In announcing that the report will go online at 9 a.m. Thursday, Freeh took pains to say no one outside his team will get copies beforehand, including the trustees. Investigators will hold a news conference that morning in Philadelphia. That day, trustees will start a two-day meeting in Scranton where they can respond to the report. A spokesman for the trustees said Wednesday the board held an informational conference call Thursday night, hours after Freeh announced the timing of the report's release. David La Torre declined to discuss the call further when asked to confirm an ESPN report the trustees discussed how they would respond to the report. "I think we'll find that this thing revolves so tightly around coach Paterno, and I would hope the Freeh report is much broader than that and addresses the university as a whole -- and how this culture was handled or mishandled correctly -- and comes to some closure on that," trustee Ryan McCombie said Tuesday. "The people who loved Joe Paterno will still love him when this is over," McCombie said. "The people who disliked him may feel they have ammunition to continue to dislike him." Paterno died of cancer in January, but his family issued a statement late Tuesday saying leaks have made them question the fairness of the Freeh group's process. They defended the Hall of Fame coach, saying he did not know Sandusky was a child molester and did not prevent a proper investigation. Sandusky, 68, was convicted of 45 counts of child sexual abuse last month and awaits sentencing. Prosecutors described how Sandusky culled the most vulnerable children from his charity for at-risk youth and used gifts and his access to Penn State facilities to abuse them over a 15-year span. The Paterno family took aim at a February 2001 email by Curley, recently reported by CNN, saying he had a change of heart about reporting the shower incident to authorities after speaking with Paterno. Penn State has disclosed that Freeh's probe turned up emails among top officials that have been given to prosecutors. "When the facts come out, it will be clear that Joe Paterno never gave Tim Curley any instructions to protect Sandusky or limit any investigation of his actions," the Paterno family's statement read. Spanier's lawyers on Tuesday broke a months-long silence to deny suggestions that he participated in a cover-up with the image of Penn State and its powerful and lucrative football program at stake. They said Spanier was never informed that Sandusky may have been abusing children. "At no time in the more than 16 years of his presidency at Penn State was Dr. Spanier told of an incident involving Jerry Sandusky that described child abuse, sexual misconduct or criminality of any kind, and he reiterated that during his interview with Louis Freeh and his colleagues," said attorneys Peter Vaira and Elizabeth Ainslie. Spanier's comments last week to the Freeh group echoed his testimony before a state grand jury that neither Curley nor Schultz informed him of the sexual nature of what graduate assistant Mike McQueary saw. CNN reported an email showed Spanier was "supportive" of a decision by Curley and Schultz not to report the incident. Spanier warned, however, that they might "become vulnerable for not having reported it," CNN said. Spanier's lawyers said the emails were "distorting the public record and creating a false picture." Both Spanier and Paterno were ousted by school trustees a few days after Sandusky's arrest in November. Michael Boni, who represents the young man called Victim 1, who testified against Sandusky, said the Freeh report will "help inform" the direction of civil litigation. "Maybe what's been leaked out is most of it, I have no idea," he said. "I certainly hope not." Tom Kline, an attorney for Victim 5, said he is particularly interested in the circumstances surrounding Sandusky's retirement in 1999, a year after a woman triggered a university police investigation by complaining Sandusky had showered with her son. Sandusky was not charged at the time, but was convicted of charges related to that incident last month. "We already know that Penn State knew enough by February of 2001 to have stopped Sandusky dead in his tracks, which would have prevented the assault on my client six months later," Kline said. Lawyers for Curley and Schultz, meanwhile, are expected to participate in a closed-door conference call on Wednesday afternoon with the attorney general's office and Judge Todd Hoover, who is presiding over their case in Harrisburg. Curley, on leave as athletic director, and Schultz, retired as vice president for business and finance, could learn when they will stand trial. Freeh and his team of lawyers and former law enforcement officials interviewed more than 400 people, asking questions that went beyond Sandusky and the child sex-abuse scandal and into the relationship between football program and the university administration. Freeh said in November that he would not interfere with the state's criminal probe but promised to conduct his review in "a thorough, fair, comprehensive manner, leaving no stone unturned, and without any fear or favor." In January, trustees adopted interim recommendations from Freeh, including changes to policies for programs involving minors, reporting of allegations of abuse; and athletic department security. The NCAA is reviewing how Penn State exerted "institutional control" in relation to the Sandusky matter, and whether university officials complied with policies that pertain to honesty and ethical conduct. The NCAA could open a more formal investigation that may expose Penn State to sanctions.

Celtics could score with a three-year deal for Gallinari

Celtics could score with a three-year deal for Gallinari

The Celtics' two main targets in free agency are expected to be Gordon Hayward and Blake Griffin. But what if neither signs here . . . or what if the C's have other plans? This week, we'll look at some of  'The Other Guys' who might interest the Celtics: TODAY: Denver's Danilo Gallinari.

BOSTON -- It seems Utah's Gordon Hayward has been at the top of the Celtics' offseason wish list forever.
 
And not too far behind him, you find Los Angeles Clippers' free-agent-to-be Blake Griffin.
 
Coming off the heels of landing the second-best free agent a year ago in Al Horford, the Celtics are feeling pretty good about this free-agent thing after having had little luck in previous years at landing the best available players.

MORE ON FREE AGENCY

 
But if Hayward and Griffin decide to stay with their respective teams or take their talents elsewhere, what will the Celtics do?
 
The Celtics will have to shift their attention to ‘The Other Guys' section of free agency, which won't move the needle like the addition of Hayward or Griffin would. Still, these players would make good additions to a Celtics team that's clearly on the rise.
 
We start off with Denver's Danilo Gallinari.
 
If you recall, Gallinari has been a player of interest for Boston as recently as the last trade deadline. However, the Nuggets were battling for the eighth and final playoff spot and had just traded for Mason Plumlee to help solidify their interior while Gallinari was having one of the best shooting seasons of his eight-year NBA career.
 
The idea of moving him at the trade deadline didn't make a lot of sense for the Nuggets, and the assets Boston would have had to come up with to match his $16.1 million contract made acquiring him a hefty cost. To be candid, it wasn't worth it then. But now?
 
WE LIKE HIM BECAUSE . . .
 
He's available. Shortly after opting out of his $16.1 option to become a free agent, he made it clear he wasn't necessarily doing it to sign a longer-team deal with Nuggets.
 
"Nuggets are not my first choice, but they are exactly at the same level of the other teams," Gallinari told reporters back in June. "Denver's advantage is that they can offer me a five-year contract while other franchises can offer me a four-year deal. Nuggets are at the same level of others."
 
Gallinari can score, and does so in a variety of ways. He averaged 18.2 points per game last season, the second-highest scoring average of his career. At 6-foot-10 and 225 pounds, the 28-year-old has the kind of multi-positional skillset that Brad Stevens could easily plug in and not miss a beat.
 
Gallinari has spent most of his NBA career playing both forward positions. But in this new age, it's not a stretch to see Gallinari used as a "stretch big" at center whose inside-outside game has the potential to make him a nightmare for teams to try and guard in Boston.
 
And while his perimeter game certainly gets a lot of attention, Gallinari can score from various points on the floor. He was one of just nine players in the NBA this past season to average at least five 3-point attempts and six free-throw attempts per game. The company he's keeping in that category includes league MVP Russell Westbrook of Oklahoma City; Houston's James Harden; could-be Celtics teammate Isaiah Thomas; Portland's Damian Lillard; New Orleans center DeMarcus Cousins; San Antonio's Kawhi Leonard; NBA Finals MVP Kevin Durant, and Toronto's Kyle Lowry.
 
They have all appeared in the All-Star game at least two of the last three seasons, which speaks to how impressive and rare it is for a shooter like Gallinari to also manage to find his way to the free-throw line a lot.
 
NOT CRAZY ABOUT . . .
 
His track record with injuries. I'm not gonna lie. It absolutely scares the crap out of me. He has eight seasons under his belt and has failed to play 63 or more games in all but two of them. That includes the lockout-shortened 2012 season, but that doesn't take away from the concerns that any team would have when it comes to Gallinari's longstanding track record of injuries.
 
So durability is not something you can bank on with this guy.
 
You love his versatility as a scorer, but he tends to take the first decent look rather than probe the defense for a better shot for him or a teammate.
 
According to nba.com/stats, 42.8 percent of his shots were catch-and-shoot attempts while 55.2 percent of the shots he takes come without a single dribble taken. For 91.7 percent of his shots taken, the amount of time he touches the ball before he launches is six seconds or less.
 
He's great at finishing around the rim, which you can see in him connecting on 64 percent of his shots in the restricted area.
 
But that number drops to 41.9 percent when he's shooting in the paint but outside of the restricted area.
 
And while the second-largest number of shot attempts for him last season (208) were mid-range attempts, he made just 38 percent of those shots with a decent number of those shots contested or forced.
 
IN CONCLUSION . . .
 
While Gallinari's durability is certainly worth questioning, his toughness and grittiness as a player isn't. He's physical and is one of the NBA's better players when it comes to finding ways to create space, whether it's with a jab-step for a Paul Pierce-like fade-away jumper, or using his footwork to get a defender off balance and out of position and then make him pay with a drive to the basket for a score or a foul. The real concern when he's on the floor comes on defense, where he had a defensive rating of 109.4 last season. Just to put that in perspective, the only Celtics with a higher defensive rating this past season were Demetrius Jackson (117.8) and Jordan Mickey (116.1), who played a combined 30 games for Boston last season.
 
He's a mixed bag of talent for sure. But as a consolation prize for falling short in the Gordon Hayward/Blake Griffin sweepstakes, he's not a bad addition.
 
SUGGESTED PRICE TAG

Three years and $60 million, with a player option for Year 3
 
WHY?

I'm sure Gallinari could probably squeeze another year and a few million more dollars from another team, but here's why a three-year deal makes a lot of sense for him.

If he wants one more big payday after this contract, he has to show 1) he can be healthy for a couple seasons and 2) he can help a team win. He'll get both opportunities playing for the Celtics.
 
And remember, he's an eight-year veteran. So after two seasons he would qualify for a max salary that would be up to 35 percent of the salary cap, which is why you give him the option for the third season.
There's no guarantee he would play well enough to get that, obviously. But at least it would be an option at his disposal, which is what you would sell him on as a reason for not getting a fourth year.

For the Celtics, he adds another scorer to the roster who can play multiple positions. And from a monetary standpoint, getting him for no more than three years as opposed to four, makes him a lot more attractive if the Celtics decide to go in another direction and trade him.

Mike Vrabel's son commits to Boston College

Mike Vrabel's son commits to Boston College

Tyler Vrabel, son of longtime Patriots linebacker Mike Vrabel, has committed to Boston College. 

Vrabel, an three-star offensive tackle prospect, announced his decision Monday on Twitter. 

According to BC Interruption, also had offers from Houston, Cincinnati, Memphis, Ohio and Toledo. He’ll now play at a school known for producing NFL offensive linemen.

Mike Vrabel spent eight seasons with the Patriots, winning three Super Bowl titles before being traded to the Chiefs in the 2009 Matt Cassel trade. He is now the Texans’ defensive coordinator.