Wright to serve as a caution for teammates

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Wright to serve as a caution for teammates

FOXBORO -- Mike Wright had no idea how serious his concussion was when a Dolphins offensive lineman hit him in the side of the head in Week 1.

He came out of the game and felt a little off. Felt dizzy. He'd had concussions before, and this one wasn't debilitating. But he told team doctors anyway, and they decided to keep him out for the rest of the game. It was the last time he would play this year.

The Patriots defensive lineman was placed on injured reserve Thursday, ending his season.

"Something that minor, guys can go back in all the time," Wright said of the hit he took in Miami. "I'm very fortunate to have team doctors and trainers like that looking out for me."

Wright spoke with the media Friday to address his symptoms, his feelings now that he definitely won't return this season, and his future.

He had hoped to return to action in the next few weeks and even practiced last week before the Jets game, but his post-concussion syndrome didn't go away as steadily as he thought it might.

"I don't think it was anything with practice (last week) that made us come to this decision," Wright said. "It was after, and moving forward, kind of thinking I'll be back at this time and it wasn't getting better. It's probably just right to give it the amount of time it needs to fully heal as opposed to rushing back and making a mistake, taking a blow that I don't need to take."

Wright missed the final seven games of last season with a concussion, and he said the symptoms he's experienced this year are similar to what he felt last year, though not as severe. Watching television gave him a "motion sickness" type of feeling. Using his computer made him feel the same way.

"I have had some troubles," Wright said, "and that's why we are where we are."

Wright's loss is a blow to the Patriots. As a versatile, hard-working defensive lineman on a line that has undergone a lot of change since last season, his presence would have been welcome.

"He always wanted to do the right thing," said Bill Belichick. "Whether is was technique or defense or a special teams assignment that he had. He's very team oriented. Very professional. A good teammate. I just feel badly for him. The way these last two seasons have gone, he just hasn't had an opportunity to do the things he's worked so hard to do.

"It's really a medical decision," Belichick added. "We have to do what's right for him."

His teammates will miss him, too. Vince Wilfork, who played with Wright since Wright's rookie year in 2005, expressed his concern on Friday.

"Mike Wright is a great player, a great person," Wilfork said. "Health is always the number one question. You play this game, you have to be smart about it. Sometimes you can fight through pain, sometimes you can't. Only Mike knows what he can do.

"I'll definitely miss him on the field," Wilfork continued. "He's a guy that's been around here for a while, he played with me for a while. I always miss guys who I played with for a long time. He knows how I play, I know how he plays. But he'll still be with us. I just wish luck with everything that he's doing. Hopefully he can get back out there soon."

Wright said going on IR was the last thing he wanted to do, but now that he's there, he won't decide on his future in football until he confers with doctors after the season. In the meantime, he plans to be around the team as much as he can.

"I've got a of friends in the locker room, a lot of relationships that I'm not ready to move away from right now so I will be here in support," Wright said.

He'll also be a reminder to his peers to come clean about their concussions. In a culture that still sometimes encourages players to "shake it off," despite all the science that's emerged about concussions and all the emphasis the NFL has put on eliminating them from the game, Wright's presence will allow players to see what can happen if you have a history of head injuries.

"I hope they can listen," Wright said. "I'll be in the locker room. A lot of guys I know are coming up to me, and I'm definitely going to spread the word. Hopefully they can learn from my situation, and kind of hopefully help them move forward in their careers, and help them protect themselves."

You can follow Phil on Twitter at @PhilAPerry.

As he steps aside temporarily, Tom Brady is ever the competitor

As he steps aside temporarily, Tom Brady is ever the competitor

FOXBORO – When Tom Brady got to the Patriots in 2000, he didn’t hand-wring about offending 28-year-old Drew Bledsoe, a three-time Pro Bowler who’d quarterbacked six NFL playoff games, including a Super Bowl.

Instead, the 199th overall pick had the gall to put Bledsoe on notice. Not that Bledsoe even seemed to notice. The first overall pick in 1993, Bledsoe couldn’t have felt too threatened by a sixth-round, part-time starter from Michigan with chubby cheeks, a bowl haircut and a soft, saggy physique.

But Brady’s aim was in plain sight. This from Charlie Pierce’s 2006 Brady biography called, Moving the Chains:

Brady reported for training camp that spring knowing the 2000 season was essentially going to be a redshirt year for him. He anticipated hardly any playing time but he determined to take the long view of his career. One evening, as he was leaving the team’s practice facility with a pizza under his arm, he ran into Robert Kraft, the team’s owner. Kraft is a billionaire businessman and he’s become one of the NFL’s most influential owners, but he’s also a fan, sometimes arguably to the point of public gaucherie. This day he was just leaving his office at about 7:45.

“So this skinny beanpole guy walks out and he comes up to me and he says, ‘Mr. Kraft? I’m Tom Brady. We haven’t met yet, but I’m the best decision this franchise has ever made.’

“And it was weird the way he said it, you know? It wasn’t like he was arrogant, but it was more like he was very confident. It was almost matter-of-fact the way he said it. I wasn’t offended at all.’

Adorable story. If it weren’t for the fact the maniac Brady believed what he said.

An accomplished high school baseball player, at the highly competitive Junipero Serra High School, who was drafted by the Expos, Brady eschewed both baseball and West Coast football. He wanted to prove himself against the very best in the country, he told me many years ago, and believed Michigan was where that would happen.

But Brady wound up buried on the depth chart when the Wolverines iced Gary Moeller, head coach when Brady came aboard, and replaced him with Lloyd Carr. After a bout of appendicitis left Brady 25 pounds lighter and Michigan started pursuing Drew Henson during Brady’s sophomore year, he wanted to transfer to Cal.

He sought counseling with Greg Harden, an associate AD and advice dispenser. Harden tough-loved Brady through it. By the time Brady got to Foxboro, he’d built up a pretty thick hide and had a far better understanding of what it was like to compete for a job than he had when he arrived at Michigan.

Meanwhile, here’s Bledsoe. Starting quarterback at Walla Walla High by the age of 16, christened the starter at Washington State in 1991 when he was 19 and two years later named the starter in New England. Never had an occasion arisen when Bledsoe was anything but the chosen one. So who could be surprised if Bledsoe didn’t perceive his job as being in any kind of jeopardy.

Bledsoe was a seal in a shark tank and didn’t even know it.

I asked Brady on Tuesday about the dynamic with Bledsoe when he arrived in 2000.

“That was a long time ago, but in college you have maybe a little bit of that [position competition],” Brady began. “That was probably right out of college where there are a lot of guys close to your age that you’re competing with, but you’re still real good friends with. Some of my best friends were Scot Loeffler, who is the offensive coordinator at BC [Boston College] now, and Brian Griese who has been a good friend of mine, and Jason Kapsner who was one of my buddies, Scott Dreisbach and Drew Henson. We were all friends. We played ping pong and we played pool together, but there was a healthy competition on the field too. We all wanted to play, but at quarterback, one guy gets to play. Then you get fresh out of college, and then I was probably – with Drew [Bledsoe], I was the same way. I used to hang out with Drew all the time. We played golf together; I’d be at his house for dinner.”

There was nothing Machiavellian about Brady announcing to the owner his intentions on rewriting Patriots history and then setting out to do it. It’s the way it’s supposed to be done. Brady, in actuality, was pretty damn forward about it. And Bledsoe accommodated.

“I was trying to learn a lot from Drew, and I learned a lot from Drew because he was such a phenomenal player and leader,” said Brady. “He was tough, disciplined. It meant so much to him. I think I learned a lot from him, I learned a lot from Damon [Huard], I learned a lot form John Friesz when I was first here. I think I used all those people as great examples because they were already pros. I had a lot to learn. I just came in, tried to do the best I could do with the experiences that I already had and then tried to transition those to a different level, a different caliber of playing, and just do the best I could do. It’s easy to do when you love what you do.”

It was Brady’s good fortune to join a team where the once-rising-star quarterback had plateaued and grown world-weary. And to have a head coach in Bill Belichick who not only loved to see players “establish their level of play” annually, but loathed seeing a sense of entitlement. It also didn’t hurt that Belichick had designed defenses that routinely made Bledsoe look inept from 1994 through 1999. 

The path for Brady was there. Bledsoe helped lay it out. Brady had the guts to take it.

All of this backstory to present you with the contemporary comparison between Tom Brady in 2000 and Jimmy Garoppolo in 2016.

If Garoppolo approached Robert Kraft in 2014 after Garoppolo was drafted and said that he would be the best decision the organization ever made, Kraft may have had Jimmy removed for the heresy.

And the nyuk-nyuks that Brady had with Drew – glitter in the AC vents! – weren’t happening with 37-year-old Tom Brady, who’d heard Belichick mention both Brady’s age and contract status when Garoppolo was drafted.

Garoppolo, unassuming, inarguably nice person from Eastern Illinois was now in the shark tank with Brady.

Brady played the first few weeks of that season in a barely controlled rage. After a loss in Kansas City when Jimmy looked delightful in late relief, Brady came back the next week, took his doubters by the metaphorical neck and – over the next few months – choked the life out of them.

Brady has never been more earnest and sincere in his support of Garoppolo than he was Tuesday.

But, as he approaches his month-long suspension, he also wears on his sleeve his love for the game. And it logically follows that he sees as a threat anyone who will be doing his job, whether that threat is reasonable or not.

“I’ve always been blessed to love this sport and love the preparation of this sport as much as I have. It really never feels like work because it’s always a learning experience. I’m still learning every day that I go out there. It’s always fresh when you start because there are always new players, always new schemes, always new plays, new situations to go over. That’s why there’s such a great – that’s why people love the sport. That’s why I love the sport, because it’s so challenging. It’s very humbling, too, because it’s incredibly difficult to perform at a high level every day,” said Brady.

“You’ve got to push yourself and find different ways to motivate yourself over the course of long periods of time,” Brady added, maybe giving a deeper glimpse into what helped him ratchet it up the past few seasons. “It’s easy if you just changed what you did every year. Everything would feel fresh all the time. But when you’ve been doing it for 17 years professionally, and then nine years, I’ve been doing it for 25 years, so I’ve got to keep finding ways to retool and learn and use things as motivation.”

Once, the motivation was easy. Win the job. Then it got harder. Win Super Bowls. Then even harder. Win like no one else has won. Finally, now, the cherry. Win longer and more often than anyone else has ever done. To ensure that happens, there will be no dropping of Tom Brady’s guard during this temporary changing of the guard.