Wright feels right at Day 2 of lockout workouts

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Wright feels right at Day 2 of lockout workouts

By TomE. Curran
CSNNE.com

CHESTNUT HILL Informal. But still damn important.

For Mike Wright, the lockout workouts held Wednesday and Thursday at Boston College give the Patriots defensive tackle a chance to get back to a place he couldnt even think about last fall.

On the field with his teammates.

Sidelined much of last season by a debilitating concussion and its aftereffects, Wright took a minute Thursday to talk about being back on the field even in this limited basis with 40 or so teammates.

Its been great, said Wright, who led the Patriots with 5.5 sacks despite his limited playing time. Its good to be back with the guys and working together. Its a chance to see some new faces, some old faces. Its good to get out there and get going for next season.

With NFL owners meeting with players head DeMaurice Smith in Chicago this week in advance of Fridays court hearing in St. Louis, were getting the strongest indication in some time that real work toward ensuring a full season is being done.

Meanwhile, Thursdays workout was a reminder of how far behind the players are getting despite their best efforts at working independently.

Normally, this would be the week the Patriots conduct their June mini-camp. It would have followed OTAs and passing camp and the rookies would have already attended their rookie mini-camp.

But this shorts and t-shirts workout on Thursday with no contact and no coaches is the most important team-wide exercise of the star-crossed offseason of 2011. How much technical correction can be done in real time? And if the practice isnt taped and then broken down, how can development happen? How much can be installed? How much can be done when players who have had their health benefits suspended by the league are loathe to get injured and have their jobs in jeopardy in the fall?

Despite all that, the benefit for the players is there. Mostly, its team building.

Whos in? Thats a question that was answered by attendance and the level of fitness players showed up in.

And if any were looking for an example of commitment, they could find veteran running back Kevin Faulk. Faulk is a free agent and coming back from a blown ACL. Yet he was on the field Thursday, moving with the quickness and confidence were accustomed to seeing.

For players like Wright, the chance to be on the field with guys hes fought next to was refreshing.

I feel much better, said Wright. Its good to be back in it and its good to be working with the guys and getting back into a normal routine. It lasted a while. Im just glad that its over. It was a lot longer than expected but Ive moved past it and Im just looking forward to next year.

Now we just need next year to get here.

Tom E. Curran can be reached at tcurran@comcastsportsnet.com.Follow Tom on Twitter at http:twitter.comtomecurran

Felger: Is the praise for Jacoby Brissett too good to be true?

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Felger: Is the praise for Jacoby Brissett too good to be true?

Three mid-week thoughts for your perusal . . . 

-- I was 100 percent behind the drafting of quarterback Jacoby Brissett. And then I read comments about the kid from Charlie Weis and Bill Parcells in Karen Guregian's excellent story in the Boston Herald on Tuesday.

Now I'm down to about 80 percent.

"He's a Curtis Martin-, Willie McGinest-, Troy Brown-type of player,'' said Parcells. "That's the kind of guy he is. That's what New England is getting. Those kind, those Tedy Bruschi types, those players who've been successful -- he's very similar in his personal life to those kinds of guys.''

"Let me tell you,'' added Weis, "this kid, from the time he was in high school, is the Pied Piper . . . He was definitely the leader of the pack. In the quarterback position, I think that's a critical factor. And that's what he was.''

Added Parcells: "He has zero personal issues.''

So why would glowing reports cause me to like the pick less? File under: Too good to be true.

I read those quotes and get the feeling I'm being sold something, which shakes my confidence a bit. Plus, it's a little too much on the intangible element. Character is certainly important at the position. In fact, it's crucial. But if intangibles were the only thing that mattered, Tim Tebow would have been an NFL QB. And we all know how that turned out.

Bottom line: I still like the pick. I still want the Pats drafting and developing quarterbacks. I just smell a bit of bull crap.

-- Chris Mannix nailed it regarding what it would take for the Celtics to lure Kevin Durant to Boston.

"Boston's ability to lure him is going to come down to who else they can get. You can't walk into a meeting with Kevin Durant and say, 'We've got Isiah Thomas and 97 draft picks; we're going to be good in a few years','' he told Toucher and Rich Tuesday morning. "Kevin doesn't want to hear that . . . What he wants to hear is that we're ready to win now . . . They have to come to the table with a Jimmy Butler, with a Bradley Beal, with an Al Horford. They can't just come with Brad Stevens, Danny Ainge and a bunch of draft picks.''

In other words, the pieces on the current roster aren't nearly as good as they looked in the regular season. And, no, Thomas is not a franchise player. And, finally, don't get too attached to those picks, no matter where the ping pong balls land.

-- I wonder if the Bruins look at the current landscape in net across the NHL playoffs and consider how wise it is to pay their goalie, Tuukka Rask, $7 million a year.

Still alive are guys like the Islanders' Thomas Greiss ($1.5 million cap hit), the Blues' Brian Ellliott ($2.5 million), the Sharks' Martin Jones ($3 million) and Penguins rookie Matt Murray ($620,000). Out are 8 of the top 10 highest-paid goalies in the league, a list including Henri Lundqvist, Carey Price, Cory Schneider, Ryan Miller and, of course, Rask.

Please note: No one is saying you can get away with shoddy goaltending in the playoffs. It's an unassailable fact that you need elite play in net to contend for Stanley Cups. The question is what you have to pay for it. 

And in that regard, this year is no aberration. Sometimes you have to pay through the nose for it, and sometimes it just falls in your lap.

Can the Bruins get away with trying to survive in that second camp? Good question. This much I know: Paying Rask $7 million a year to miss the playoffs two straight years isn't doing anyone any good.

Email Felger at mfelger@comcastsportsnet.com. Listen to Felger and Mazz weekdays, 2-6 p.m. on 98.5 FM. The simulcast runs daily on CSN.