Potential Patriots draftees: Nate Solder

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Potential Patriots draftees: Nate Solder

By TomE. Curran
CSNNE.com

Heading into the NFL draft, Tom E. Curran plans a series of looks at potential Patriots draftees. Today's player: Nate Solder

Nate Solder, 6-8, 319OT, Colorado

The Skinny: Massive football player who entered Colorado as a tight end prospect but was transitioned into a left tackle during his redshirt sophomore season. Started at left tackle the next 38 games consecutively. Pro Football Weekly's Nolan Nawrocki notes that, on 1,400 career pass plays, he allowed five sacks and 21 pressures. The Patriots have visited extensively with Solder, a player described as being very professional, dedicated and coachable. One of the reasons they may have spent significant time with him, though, was to figure if that long frame can put more weight on without sacrificing too much athleticism and to find out if his relatively meager 21 bench press reps were indicative of a guy who will struggle with bull rushes.

Gotta Have Him: Smart, diligent, a "Patriots type" player. With Matt Light a free agent and on in years, the new guy - whether it be right tackle Sebastian Vollmer or a draftee - needs to be groomed. Solder has been ticketed to the Eagles with the 23rd overall pick. He's going to get better as he goes and - under the watch of line coach Dante Scarnecchia, he could be a long-time fixture at left tackle.

Don't Need Him: Not sure if he has the versatility the Patriots covet in their prospects. While a guy like Baylor's Danny Watkins can play guard or tackle on either side, Solder seems a guy who will just be a tackle. And when you have a guy who's that long, it's sometimes difficult for them to keep players from getting under them and driving them back.

Forecast: He's got a lot of things the Patriots will like. And playing for Colorado he was against solid competition that gives the team a good read on his performance level. The height issue didn't scare them off Sebastian Vollmer. Still, if there were one lineman in the early part of this draft that seems to play to their strengths, it seems to be Watkins.
Patriots Draftability: 7
Tom E. Curran can be reached at tcurran@comcastsportsnet.com.Follow Tom on Twitter at http:twitter.comtomecurran

Jim Breuer reads purported Jastremski email to Toucher and Rich

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Jim Breuer reads purported Jastremski email to Toucher and Rich

On Toucher and Rich, comedian Jim Breuer reads an email he says he received from a man he met at a Mexican resort who said he was John Jastremski, a key figure in the Patriots’ Deflategate saga. 

Watch the video for more. 
 

Breuer identifies picture as Patriots staffer Jastremski: ‘Absolutely’ him

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Breuer identifies picture as Patriots staffer Jastremski: ‘Absolutely’ him

Toucher & Rich try to get to the bottom of comedian Jim Breuer's ‎Deflategate story. Breuer IDs a picture of Patriots equipment staffer John Jastremski as the man he met last year at a resort in Mexico who told him he was the key guy in the controversy.

Watch the video for more. 

Before first open OTA practice, a quick look at Patriots media policy

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Before first open OTA practice, a quick look at Patriots media policy

FOXBORO -- The Patriots will hold their third OTA session of the spring on Thursday. It will be the first that is open to the media and will run for about two hours starting at 10:55 a.m. 

Because the Bills made headlines this week with their media policies during OTAs, below is a quick reminder of what is allowed and what isn't at Gillette Stadium during OTAs.

The policies have gone essentially unchanged since last year. Live tweeting or blogging during the practice is prohibited during a closed practice like Thursday's, but tweets following the session are allowed. (During practices that are open to the public, like training camp sessions with fans in attendance, some live updates are permitted.)

Here are the rules in detail, courtesy of the Patriots media relations staff . . . 

Media attending practices during OTAs are asked to cooperate in observing the following practice policies:

1. Please do not report on strategy. This includes describing formations, personnel groups, first-team/second-team groupings and non-conventional plays.

2. Live streaming of any video during practice or open locker room periods to the Internet or any other social media platform while on team premises is prohibited. 

3. Please do not quote, paraphrase or report the comments made by coaches or players during a practice session.

4. Please do not provide any live report updates during practice, this includes tweeting, blogging or posts to any social media platforms.

5. Please do not report on players who line up in positions different from the one listed on the roster.

If there are any questions regarding these policies during a practice session, please ask for clarification from a Patriots media relations representative in advance. Thank you in advance for your cooperation.

The Bills irked the Pro Football Writers Association earlier this week when it unveiled its new media policy for OTAs. 

The team has prohibited referencing plays run or game strategy, including trick plays or unusual formations. It has also banned media members from reporting on personnel groupings, sub-packages, players who are practicing with individual units (first-team, second-team, goal-line offense, nickel defense, etc.), special plays, who is rushing the passer, dropped passes, interceptions, quarterback completion percentage and other statistical information.

PFWA president Jeff Legwold wrote an email to the Associated Press this week that called the policy "a vast overreach of the guidelines in the [NFL’s] current media policy" and "not only unnecessary, it is not in compliance."