Players can see team doctors during lockout

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Players can see team doctors during lockout

By Tom E. Curran
CSNNE.com

Digging into my Boston Globe Sunday, I found a story on Patriots team doctor Thomas Gill. Written by Amalie Benjamin, the story opens with an anecdote about Gill being in his fourth floor office at MGH when he excuses himself from a conversation because "one of the Patriots showed up."Wait, what? I thought team doctors were off-limits during the lockout. So too did the NFLPA - or at least some members of it. The union shuttered its old website when it decertified but stated a new one called NFLLockout.com. And in a March 21 story entitled "What Happens in a Lockout?" one line says, "Players and agents cannot talk to coaches, team PR, team doctors, etc."So I checked with the NFL. Me and whoevercobbled together the "WhatHappens in a Lockout?" story were mistaken. According to NFL spokesman Greg Aiello, players are free to meet with team doctorsas long as it's away from the facility.Team trainers can also glean information about the convalesence of the players from those doctors. So if you're say, Aaron Hernandez coming off hip surgery, you can be at Dr. Gill's office getting checked out. You cannot be inside Gillette Stadium getting your workout on, however.That I had a mistaken perception (six syllables used there instead of the one-word syllable "wrong"), is one thing. That the union is putting the mistaken notion out in their informational bullet points as recently as a week ago is indefensible.As youwere, Dr. Gill. (UPDATE: Commenter Marima asked "What did Dr. Gill do that was indefensible?" After reading my last two sentences, I understand her confusion. Very poorly worded by me. I meant "as you were" in the "keep doing what you're doing, Doc" sense not intending at all to impugn the good Doctor. A round of apologies and barium swallows on me.)

Tom E. Curran can be reached at tcurran@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Tom on Twitter at http:twitter.comtomecurran

NFL: 'No credible evidence' Manning used PEDs

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NFL: 'No credible evidence' Manning used PEDs

The NFL released a statement on Monday saying that after a seven-month investigation into allegations made in a documentary produced by Al-Jazeera America, it found "no credible evidence" that Peyton Manning used HGH or any other performance-enhancing drugs. 

In its documentary, released in December, Al-Jazeera used former British sprinter Liam Collins to go undercover to try to expose PED use by athletes. Collins spoke at length with a supplement salesman named Charlie Sly, who claimed he worked with Manning at the Guyer Institute, an anti-aging clinic in Indianapolis following Manning's 2011 neck surgery, and that the Guyer Institute sent HGH to Manning's wife, Ashley.

Manning, who retired about a month after his Denver Broncos beat the Carolina Panthers in Super Bowl 50,  vehemently denied the allegations. Meanwhile, Sly -- who was recorded by Collins without consent -- later recanted his claims.

The NFL did not release all the details of its investigation, but it explained in its statement that both Mannings were "fully cooperative" with the investigation. They agreed to interviews and provided access "to all records sought by investigators," the NFL said.

The league did say that its investigation was led by the NFL's security and legal teams with "support from expert consultants and other professionals." 

"The investigation involved witness interviews," the NFL said, "a review of relevant records and other materials, online research, and laboratory analysis and review."

Al-Jazeera's documentary implicated several other NFL players, including Steelers linebacker James Harrison, Packers linebackers Clay Matthews and Julius Peppers. The league said that its separate investigations into those claims are ongoing.

Patriots add DB Sunseri, OL Kerbyson in lead-up to training camp

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Patriots add DB Sunseri, OL Kerbyson in lead-up to training camp

The Patriots added a pair of free agents on Sunday, defensive back Vinnie Sunseri and offensive lineman Kyler Kerbyson, bringing their active roster to a total of 89 players in the days leading up to the start of training camp. 

The Saints selected Sunseri in the fifth round out of Alabama in 2014. He played in nine games as a rookie before suffering a season-ending broken arm. Last year, he did not see any time during the regular season due to a knee injury suffered during a preseason game. 

Sunseri, 5-foot-11, 210 pounds, was released by the Saints in April. Given his ties to Bill Belichick confidante Nick Saban, his special teams experience, and what's thought to be a high football IQ, Sunseri appears to check several boxes that the Patriots like to see out of depth pieces on their roster. Should safety Nate Ebner not be fully prepared to begin the season after competing in the Olympics, Sunseri could benefit by snagging that potential open roster spot. 

Kerbyson measures in at 6-4, 317 pounds and arrives to New England as an undrafted free agent from Tennessee. He's a lineman with some versatility as he started all 13 games for the Vols at left tackle in 2015, but he started games at both tackle spots and left guard as a junior. 

The Patriots had a handful of offensive linemen who were not able to participate in spring practices as they recovered from injuries -- including tackles Sebastian Vollmer and Nate Solder and guards Josh Kline and Tre' Jackson -- and Kerbyson could provide some measure of depth up front should any of those players need to miss training camp time. 

Four killed in crash involving Dallas Cowboys' bus

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Four killed in crash involving Dallas Cowboys' bus

PHOENIX (AP) -- A bus carrying Dallas Cowboys staffers but no players and a van collided Sunday on an Arizona highway, killing four people in the van, authorities said.

The bus occupants emerged uninjured from the crash, Arizona Department of Public Safety spokesman Quentin Mehr said.

"All on the bus came through OK with some bumps and bruises," Cowboys spokesman Rich Dalrymple said in an email.

Dalrymple said the bus was only carrying members of the franchise's staff but would not say how many. There were no players on board.

Mickey Spagnola, a columnist for the team's website, has been writing for the past week about traveling on a Cowboys bus with a driver, the team mascot and videographer. On his Twitter page, Spagnola tweeted before 2 p.m. that the bus was 80 miles outside of Vegas.

The two vehicles collided in the afternoon on U.S. 93, about 30 miles north of the city of Kingman or 180 miles northeast of Phoenix, according to DPS.

The crash shut down at least one lane of the highway that serves as the main route between Las Vegas and Phoenix.

The bus was on its way to a Dallas Cowboys fan event in Las Vegas. Charles Cooper, manager of GameWorks entertainment center in Vegas, said the session with 50 to 75 fans was scheduled for 3 p.m. PDT. People were already waiting when the president of a Las Vegas Cowboys fan club called to relay news of the accident. The event was subsequently canceled. Cooper says the team mascot was supposed to appear.

After the Las Vegas stop, the bus was scheduled to go on to Oxnard, California for the team's training camp. Members of the organization typically take a bus two weeks before the camp starts and make stops along the way.