Pats' DL Wright should be good to go

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Pats' DL Wright should be good to go

By Tom E. Curran
CSNNE.com

Mike Wright led the Patriots in sacks in 2010 with 5.5 of them. And that was despite missing the final six games of the regular season. Wright suffered a concussion against the Colts on November 21. It was bad enough to send him unsteadily off the field that day. It was bad enough to make it difficult for him to watch television for the next few weeks. But Wright is getting right. According to Ian Rapoport of the Boston Herald, a source close to the players says Wright made significant progress in overcoming the post-concussion trauma about a month ago. The source added, "He'll be completely ready to go for next year."As we approach the 2011 draft, it's important to know the status of Wright as the Patriots make their plans. And, as we spend our time poring over the guys at the top of the draft with the high grades and paragraphs of analysis after their names, it's also worth noting where Wright came from. Undrafted out of Cincinnati in 2005.

Tom E. Curran can be reached at tcurran@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Tom on Twitter at http:twitter.comtomecurran

Brady on Garoppolo: ‘I love being with Jimmy’

Brady on Garoppolo: ‘I love being with Jimmy’

FOXBORO – Tom Brady offered strong support of Jimmy Garoppolo on Tuesday. In probably his last press conference until after his four-game Deflategate suspension, Brady was asked if his relationship with his backup is at all similar to Brady’s relationship to Drew Bledsoe back in 2000 and 2001, which Brady said was very much a mentoring atmosphere.

“I have no idea. We’re totally on different ends of the spectrum,” said Brady, referring to Garoppolo. “I love being with Jimmy. I’ve enjoyed every day that we’ve spent with him. I wish him the very best, obviously. For our team. For [him]. When you see people that it means a lot to, you always want them to succeed as well. It will be tough to watch but I will be excited to watch and excited to learn. And hopefully when I come back in October I’ll be a better player than I am today.”

The Brady-Garoppolo dynamic has deserved close observation in recent weeks because it gives fascinating insight into how the greatest quarterback of his generation deals with his own football mortality.

The four-game sabbatical is temporary. But Brady’s distress last week after missing the Bears game, saying he “only had so many games left” to play, his discomfort with not being able to physically lead the team that day and the unbridled practice intensity he’s shown (25-for-25 on a Friday in an intrasquad scrimmage), plus his apparent impatience to get into the damn game last week against Carolina all combined to show just how hard this is for Brady.

It’s not necessarily even about Garoppolo. It’s about someone other than Brady squatting in Brady’s huddle and leading his offense. So it was good that Brady articulated his support of Garoppolo both as a person and as a player.

Brady can be both beside himself about Garoppolo playing quarterback instead of him and still like the kid and hope for the best. Ignoring the former with “all is well” blinders on is missing out an opportunity to observe the mindset of one of the NFL’s all-time greatest players and what exactly made him great.

 

 

 

Brady mum on suspension plans: 'I don't want to give away all my secrets'

Brady mum on suspension plans: 'I don't want to give away all my secrets'

FOXBORO -- Tom Brady's smile at the Gillette Stadium podium belied his reluctance to divulge any information about his plans for his four-week suspension. He was, in essence, the feline pleasantly digesting the canary that the NFL had shoved down his throat.

Brady won't be allowed at the Patriots facilities, and he won't be allowed to be in contact with teammates or coaches for football-related matters. On Tuesday, in what will likely be his final meeting with reporters until after his suspension, Brady was asked what he'll do during his time away in order to remain sharp. 

"We'll see," he said.

Would he plan on staying in the area?

"We'll see," he repeated.

OK, well, did he plan on telling members of the media exactly what he planned on doing?

"No," Brady said. "I don't. In case anyone else is in this situation in the future, I don't want to give away all my secrets."

Brady will gladly share his thoughts on his nutrition plan and deliver it to your doorstep for a couple hundred bucks, but workouts like the ones he performs on his own in the offseason -- or the ones he'll take on for most of September -- he generally keeps close to the vest. 

Brady's business partner and friend Alex Guerrero, who along with Brady runs the TB12 Performance Center at Patriot Place, will be able to work with Brady during his time off. Guerrero is often on the Patriots sidelines or in the Patriots locker room, but he is not a team employee, meaning time with him would not violate the terms of Brady's suspension, an NFL spokesperson told CSN's Mike Giardi.

"That's nice of them," Brady said sarcastically. 

"We've been working together for over 12 years now," Brady added. "He's one of my best friends. We'll do what we always do. Work. We'll use all these days in the best way that's possible to stay prepared and stay sharp. I have ideas that I need to do. Based on the practices that we've had and the limited playing time that I've had. My goal is to come back and be the best I can be. Just like every other year. Just like every offseason, I'm gonna do the best I can do over these next however many days, 30 days or so, to do the same thing. 

"I've got a good day of practice. I've tried to look at all these days of practice as ways to get better. I have access to the fields, and throwing to my receivers. Try to use those days the best that I can, just like I always would. I got another hopefully opportunity to play on Thursday night, be with the team Friday, and then try to do the best that I can over the next month."

His plans for the next month, however, will remain secret for now.