Patriots wearing out the no-huddle offense

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Patriots wearing out the no-huddle offense

FOXBORO -- If the Patriots plan on running the no-huddle offense on Monday night against the Kansas City Chiefs, they're not going to tell anybody about it beforehand.

But facts are facts. And the fact is, New England seems to enjoy running the the offense in no-huddle mode, as seen in Sunday night's win over the New York Jets.

Some Patriots players talked about the effects of their no-huddle style. Others -- like veteran running back Kevin Faulk -- grew frustrated by continued questions about the certain style that may or may not be used against the Chiefs' defense.

"The speed of the game changes for us," said Faulk, when first asked about it.

He then said, "I think it's just a change-up that we try to do as an offensive team. The effectiveness shows on the football field. If you're not moving the ball, it's not effective . . . It's just something you try to surprise people with."

And when a third question about the no-huddle came, Faulk showed his impatience and discomfort in speaking about the topic.

"There's no need to talk about the no-huddle right now," he said. "Let's go. Anything else?"

Whether or not that response means he doesn't want to reveal any of the Patriots' game plan to the Chiefs remains to be seen.

But one thing we do know is, they enjoy the no-huddle.

"It gets pretty tiring, but theyre getting tired too, so thats the main thing," said offensive lineman Logan Mankins. "Its nice to do it occasionally when its working good. We like it. The D-line, I think they get more tired than we actually do because they have to chase the ball. But it does get pretty tiring in there. You dont have the rest between plays like in the huddle."

Wide receiver Deion Branch was a beneficiary of the no-huddle offense on Sunday against the Jets. The speed of New England's no-huddle had New York's defense -- at times -- in a state of confusion. And at least on one play, Branch found himself wide open on the right sideline off Tom Brady's quick snap, as Jets defenders hadn't even jumped out of their huddle.

Brady found Branch with a quick, easy pass, and it was just another example of why they do it.

"Guys get fatigued," said Branch on Thursday at Gillette Stadium. "We're going to get tired, and hopefully we're going to make their defense as tired as we are.

"For the most part, we're pretty sound with the stuff that we're doing. Coach Belichick is not going to give us an overhaul of plays. I think you can try to go into that no-huddle situation, and put 40, 50 plays in, and that's a big challenge as well. I think coach does a good job of making sure we have the right amount of plays. It's just based on us. making sure we're staying focused and doing what we're supposed to do."

There is a negative side to the no-huddle, however. As Branch explained on Thursday, while it works to help catch a fatigued defense off-guard, it also can result in some sloppy false starts on the offensive end.

"We've been having a lot of flags, false starts, things of that nature," said Branch. "That stuff comes into play when you're physically or mentally tired, or something like that. That's something that happens during the course of running a no-huddle."

Mankins agreed, but said that some of those false start calls are unavoidable.

"Sometimes it is focus and concentration," said Mankins. "Sometimes you just barely twitch just a tiny little bit and youre going to get called. There are so many referees or umpires, whatever you want to call them, watching the O-line now, especially with the other guy moved behind. Theres two guys just sitting there staring at us. Theyre going to catch any little thing."

But if it means catching the Chiefs defense snoozing, the Patriots will continue to take that risk on Monday night.

Bell's style, and unique talents, present challenges to Patriots defense

Bell's style, and unique talents, present challenges to Patriots defense

FOXBORO -- There are plenty of damn good running backs in the NFL but there is only one Le’Veon Bell. The Steelers star shuffles, darts and then dashes, often with bodies crashing all around him, many of them intent on doing serious bodily harm . . . but often failing.

“He’s very unique,” said linebacker Shea McClellin. “I don’t think anyone else runs quite like he does, but it’s efficient and it works.”

Defensive end Chris Long concurred: “His style is so unique, his patience, what he’s able to do with his vision. And as far as breaking tackles, being a complete player, catching the ball, he can do all that stuff.”

Now don’t get it twisted. The Pats respect the hell out of Bell, but they’d prefer they weren’t in charge of corralling him Sunday because everyone has failed during Pittsburgh’s nine-game winning streak. Bell, who played in eight of those games, has piled up over 1,500 yards from the line of scrimmage during that stretch -- 1,172 yards rushing, 336 yards receiving -- while scoring 9 touchdowns. 

“He’s really fun to watch unless you’re getting ready to play him,” said Long.

The respect Bell commands in Foxboro is evident when talking to the Pats running backs, who spoke glowingly about the former first-rounder and in LeGarrette Blount’s case, former teammate.

“No one can do what he does,” Blount told me. “They can try, but it won’t work.”

“That’s his style,” added Dion Lewis, himself a shifty fella. “You can’t try to do that. I’m pretty sure he’s the only guy that can do that.”

So how do the Pats accomplish something no one has been able to do over the last two-plus months? How do they slow Bell down, as they did back in Week 7, limiting him to 81 yards rushing (only 3.9 yards per carry)? 

“I think defensively he really forces you to be disciplined,” said Pats coach Bill Belichick. “You jump out of there too quickly then you open up gaps and open up space. Le’Veon has a great burst through the hole. He doesn’t really need long to get through there, runs with good pad level. He’s hard to tackle so if you don’t get a full body on him then he’ll run right through those arm tackles. [He] really forces everybody to be sound in their gaps.”

“If there’s space or if there’s a gap in the defense or if there’s an edge in the defense, he’s quick to take advantage of that,” defensive coordinator Matt Patricia told us during a conference call earlier this week. “He’s going to be able to get into that open space pretty quickly so you can’t really -- I don’t think you want to sit there and guess.”

If the Pats defenders, especially at the linebacker level, do that -- guess and attack a gap aggressively in attempt to make a splash play -- they may fill one gap but open two others. And that’s where a four-yard gain can turn into 40.

“Everyone on the field, it’s their job to get to him, gang tackle and be aggressive,” said Rob Ninkovich. “It can’t be just one time but every time you’re on the field.”

“There’s no one guy that can stop him,” added Belichick. “You’re going to have to have everybody doing a good job in a number of different areas all the way across the front and then do a good job of tackling.”

The Pats are a terrific tackling team, and haven’t allowed a 100-yard rusher this season (actually, not since November of 2015), but the red-hot Bell will put recent history to the test. 
 

Roethlisberger has Brady's jersey hung on the wall of his office

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Roethlisberger has Brady's jersey hung on the wall of his office

FOXBORO -- It was a rare moment between Super Bowl champion quarterbacks. Tom Brady and Ben Roethlisberger met on the Heinz Field turf before a game back in October, and Roethlisberger -- who wasn't playing that day due to injury -- brought to Brady a request

"Um, hey, listen," he said. "I've never done this before, but I would love to get a jersey at some point. It'd mean...There's not many I want to put in my office. You're the best, dude."

Brady was happy to oblige.

"Sure, I'd love to," Brady said. "I'll get you after the game."

During a conference call with Patriots reporters on Wednesday, Roethlisberger was asked about that interraction, and he sounded a little upset that Showtime's Inside the NFL cameras caught it. 

"I hate that those things get taped and [heard] because it wasn’t meant for that," he said. "I have it hanging in my office. I have a lot of respect for him. I think that’s very well known.

"I think he’s one of, if not the greatest, quarterbacks of all time. It’s been an honor to play against him, to call him a competitor, and so I put it up in my office with the likes of the Marinos and Elways and Kellys and things like that."

Brady was asked about Roethlisberger during a press conference a little later in the day, and it was mentioned to him that Roethlisberger gave his jersey some coveted wall space. 

"Ben is an incredible player, and he’s been that way since 2004 when he came into the league," Brady said. "I’ve always loved the way he plays, very tough, hard-nosed. He’s great for the city of Pittsburgh – a very tough, hard-nosed city. I have a lot of friends from there. He’s just been a great player. I think the respect is very mutual. To play at his level for as long as he has and with his style of play has been remarkable."