Myra Kraft, wife of Patriots owner, dies at 68

191543.jpg

Myra Kraft, wife of Patriots owner, dies at 68

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. (AP) -- Myra Kraft, the wife of New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft and a long-time philanthropist, has died. She was 68.

The NFL team said in a statement on its website that Myra Hiatt Kraft died Wednesday morning after a battle with cancer. The statement said "we are all heartbroken" and added that the philanthropic community has "suffered a great loss."

Myra Kraft held key positions in numerous charitable and community organizations.

She managed the Robert and Myra Kraft Family Foundation and was president of the New England Patriots Charitable Foundation, which contributed millions of dollars to charities in the United States and Israel.

In 1995, she became the first woman to chair the Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston, a position she held until 2002.

She married Robert Kraft in June 1963 while she was a student at Brandeis University.

Myra Kraft was the daughter of Jacob Hiatt, who grew up in Lithuania and moved to the United States in 1935. He settled in Worcester, where she was born. Hiatt became president of the E.F. Dodge Paper Box Corp. in Leominster in 1938 and stayed on when it was bought by Whitney Box.

The company is now known as the Rand-Whitney Group which Robert Kraft bought in 1972. He now serves as its chairman and chief executive officer.

Myra Kraft also served as chairwoman of the Combined Jewish Philanthropies and was on the board of directors of the American Repertory Theatre, Brigham and Women's Hospital, the United Way of Massachusetts Bay, the Boys and Girls Clubs of Boston, and Brandeis.

The Krafts have four sons, Jonathan, Daniel, Joshua and David. Jonathan is president of the Patriots. Daniel is president and CEO of International Forest Products, founded in 1972 by his father. Joshua is president and CEO of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston.

Bill Belichick issued a statement on Wednesday:

On behalf of the entire Patriots football operation, we mourn the passing of Myra Kraft. As much support as her quiet but unmistakable presence provided us in the competitive arena and as much as I personally will miss her warm embraces before and after each game, Myra shined brightest in a much broader arena.

In the humanitarian arena, her generosity through philanthropy was admired and appreciated by all. She made a permanent impression on hundreds of coaches, players, staff and our families as a model of grace, strength and giving. Myras vision and example will impact and remain very much with our team forever.
-- The Associated Press

SUNDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL: Rawls leads Seahawks to 40-7 rout of Panthers

panthers_seahawks_thomas_rawls_120416.jpg

SUNDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL: Rawls leads Seahawks to 40-7 rout of Panthers

SEATTLE - Behind Thomas Rawls bouncing off and through tacklers and a big-play punch from Tyler Lockett, the Seattle Seahawks rediscovered their offensive star power on Sunday night.

It came at a significant cost to their defense.

Rawls ran for 103 yards and two touchdowns in the first half, Lockett took a reverse 75 yards for a score to open the second half and the Seahawks routed the Carolina Panthers 40-7 on Sunday night.

Click here to read the complete story

Troy Brown: Greatest Show on Turf lost to 'greatest team on [bleeping] Earth'

Troy Brown: Greatest Show on Turf lost to 'greatest team on [bleeping] Earth'

Move over, Larry Bird and David Ortiz. Troy Brown is joining the party.

Bird was the inaugural member of Pottymouthed Boston Athletes Speaking In Public group; in 1981, he enlived the Celtics' City Hall Plaza celebration of their NBA title by quipping, "Yeah, Moses does eat [blank]" after spotting a sign in the crowd that declared Moses Malone of the just-vanguished Houston Rockets ate . . . well, you know. In 2013, he was joined by Ortiz, though Big Papi's expletive was emotional and from the heart: Days after the Boston Marathon bombing that killed three and injured 264, Ortiz thundered "This is our [bleeping] city" to a stunned, and then delighted, Fenway Park crowd honoring the first responders to the tragedy.

And now we have Troy Brown.

MORE ON 2001 PATRIOTS

The Patriots honored their 2001 Super Bowl champions, who not only kicked off the Patriots dynasty but jump-started Boston's decade-and-a-half of athletic dominance, at halftime of Sunday's win over the Rams. It proceeded as expected -- you knew you were going to hear Robert Kraft's "We are all Patriots" again (and again, and again) -- until Brown took the podium.

“The best fans, we got them," he began. "The best coach, we got him. The best owner, we got him. The most rings, we’re working it.”

Pointing to the group of 40 or so ex-teammates who had gathered for the occasion, he continued: “This is the original group of guys who did their job. The Optum Lounge, the nice seats and the scoreboard" -- in other words, Gillette Stadium -- "is here because of this group."

It was the group that upset the Rams -- a.k.a. The Greatest Show On Turf -- in Super Bowl XXXVI. And, in the end, Brown couldn't hold his tongue.

"Fifteen years ago, the Greatest Show on Turf lost to the greatest team on [bleeping] Earth.”

Larry and Big Papi? You've got company.