Looking at Haynesworth's lengthy rap sheet

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Looking at Haynesworth's lengthy rap sheet

By Phil Perry
CSNNE.com

Earlier this summer, Redskins defensive coordinator Jim Haslett confirmed what everyone had already heard: Albert Haynesworth can be a real pain in the locker room, the meeting room, etc.

"He can do almost anything he wants. He doesnt want to do anything. To me thats the issue, Haslett told 101 ESPN Radio in St. Louis. Hes one of those guys you walk in a meeting and you tell him, Put down the phone. The next day you have to tell him to put down the phone. The next day, you tell him to put down the phone.

You tell him, Dont read the newspaper in meetings. The next day you have to tell him the same thing. It doesnt stick; its an every-day thing.

If only those were the worst of Haynesworth's problems.

The irritable defensive tackle has a propensity for breaking the law, almost breaking the law, and being accused of breaking the law. He has racked up a significant rap sheet ever since his college days at Tennessee. Here's a list of his most infamous indiscretions, including the one that put his volatile personality on the map: the stomp heard 'round the NFL.

At the University of Tennessee in November 2000, Haynesworth, a sophomore, got mad at Volunteers offensive tackle Will Ofenheusle. Haynesworth left the practice field and returned with what multiple reports described as a "long pole," but Tennessee coach Phillip Fulmer intervened.

In training camp of 2003, Haynesworth started a team brawl by kicking Titans center Justin Hartwig. Then, in December 2003, Titans coach Jeff Fisher deactivated Haynesworth for one game after Haynesworth hit Matt Martin in the back of the head during an argument.

In June of 2006, a judge dismissed reckless endangerment charges against Haynesworth after a motorist alleged Haynesworth tried to run her off Interstate 40 in Tennessee. Haynesworth said he was the one who had been the victim of road rage.

Then came the stomp. Looking back at the video, it appears as though Haynesworth actually missed when he first tried to step on Andre Gurode's face during a game in October 2006. Haynesworth went back to make sure the second landed flush, and it did. He opened a gash on Gurode's face that need 30 stitches to sew up. He was slapped with a 15-yard unsportsmanlike conduct penalty, which was followed by a second 15-yard penalty and an ejection after he removed his helmet to curse out the official.

Haynesworth was apologetic after the incident.

"What I did out there was disgusting," he said. "It doesn't matter what the league does to me. The way I feel right now, you just can't describe it."

He was suspended by the NFL for five games without pay.

In December of 2008, Haynesworth caused an accident driving over 100 mph in his Ferrari and left a man seriously injured. The man needed hip replacement surgery after the accident and it was alleged he could not move without a walker or a wheelchair.

Haynesworth showed the Redskins last season that even when he's not being gratuitously violent on the field, or breaking the law, he can still kill your team. He boycotted mandatory minicamp, then needed ten tries to pass a conditioning test to get on the field. He refused to play in the Redskins base defense and was suspended for the final four games of last season by coach Mike Shannahan.

In February, he was accused of punching a man in the nose during an alleged case of road rage. He paid the accuser to settle the case.

This spring he was indicted on sexual assault charges after allegedly fondling a waitress while paying his bill at the W Hotel in Washington, DC. His attorney has accused the waitress of trying to make a cash grab. Haynesworth rejected a plea offer in May. He told investigators the waitress was upset because he is not attracted to black women. If convicted, he faces up 180 days in jail and a fine of 1,000. The trial is set to begin August 2.

Brady on whether he called Trump: 'I've called him in the past'

Brady on whether he called Trump: 'I've called him in the past'

When President Donald Trump announced last week that he'd received a phone call from Tom Brady, Brady's response when questioned by reporters at a mass press conference was "Let's talk about football."

This morning, during his weekly interview on WEEI's Kirk and Callahan Show, Brady shed a little more light onto the subject.

Though not a whole lot more.

"I have called him, yes, in the past," Brady said when given the chance the confirm or deny the call.  "Sometimes he calls me. Sometimes I call,. But, again, that’s been someone I’ve known. I always try to keep it in context because for 16 years you know someone before maybe he was in the position that he was in. He’s been very supportive of me for a long time. It’s just a friendship. I have a lot of friends. I call a lot of people.”

He also explained why he chooses to dance around this topict . . . and a lot of others.

“I’m a pretty positive person, so I don’t want to create any distractions for our team and so forth,” he said. “I just try and stay positive and actually this world could use a little more positivity. Everything’s not great in this world and everything is not great in life. But if you try and take a positive approach … I try to do that. I try to do that in practice. I try to do that with my team. I try to do that with my family. That’s how I go about life. I don’t like negativity. I don’t like a lot of confrontation. Those things don’t make me feel very good. I wouldn’t be a good talk show host."

Curran: Relentless Patriots proving that living well is the best revenge

Curran: Relentless Patriots proving that living well is the best revenge

FOXBORO -- There's a clock on the wall in the weight room at Tom Brady's house.

When the Patriots lost to the Broncos in the AFC Championship Game last January, Brady's father told me his son set the clock to count away the days, hours, minutes and seconds until Super Bowl 51. That clock has just 13 days left on it now. It won't require a sad resetting this week.

Brady won't be around to see it hit zeroes. He'll be in Texas playing in his record seventh Super Bowl. As planned.

PATRIOTS 33, STEELERS 9

HERE THEY COME, ROGER

The Patriots are the last team the NFL apparatus wanted to see in Houston and now the boogeyman's at their door, proving that living well is the best revenge.

Nowhere to run to, Roger. Nowhere to hide. The rules apply to everyone and there's a rule that we all learn sooner or later is very true. What goes around comes around. We all have it coming, kid.

We imagine Brady is clearing his throat for the delicious last laugh, but he's said it a hundred different ways in the past four months: Vengeance and vindication aren't driving him. That's wasted energy. Poison.

He's focused on what's immediately in front of him while reminding himself time's fleeting. The best way for him to help his team during his four-game exile in September was to work out relentlessly, which he did so that when he returned he was as good as he's ever been.

And in his absence, his team understood the best way to honor him while he was gone was to take care of business. Which they did beginning September 12 in Arizona when, instead of playing rudderless football without their on-field leader, they began a 3-1 run with a combination of Jimmy Garoppolo and Jacoby Brissett at quarterback.

"Yeah, well we never dwell on that," Bill Belichick began when I asked him Sunday night about the obstacles the team's had in front of it beginning in September and through the rest of the season. "We take the hand that we're dealt and play the cards . . .

"You referenced the beginning of the year, but it's been true in every game, really," Belichick added. "It's a credit to those guys. It's a credit to the depth on our team and the way that those guys prepare. They work hard. They don't know if they're going to get an opportunity or not and then when it finally comes and they do get it, they're usually ready to take advantage of it and help the team win. That's why we're where we are. We have a special team, a special group of guys that really work hard. They deserve the success that they've had. I mean, it's hard to win 16 games in this league. You've got to give a lot of credit to the players and the job they've done all year week after week. It's tough, but they come in and grind it out. They sit in these seats for hours, and hours, and hours, and prepare, and prepare, and go out there and lay it on the line every week. Again, it's a good group of men."

Beginning in the offseason with the trade of Chandler Jones to the start of the season with the Brady suspension to the stunning trade of Jamie Collins, the loss of Rob Gronkowski and a defense that was scoffed at on a weekly basis, the Patriots have weathered all of it to get to this point.

"One More" is the marketing slogan this team's had affixed to it.

"Bend Don't Break" is much more apt. Because they never did.

It's a phrase that's been framed as a slight by when used to describe the New England defense this season but safety Duron Harmon had a different interpretation.

"I don't know. I kind of like it," he said. "It just shows the type of toughness and mental toughness we have. Even when the situation might seem terrible or might seem bad, we have enough mental toughness to come out and make a positive out of it."

Harmon and Patrick Chung hauled down Steelers tight end Jesse James inches short of a touchdown just before halftime. The Patriots defense held after that, forcing Pittsburgh to settle for a deflating field goal. Instead of a 17-13 lead at halftime, the Pats led 17-9.

"Right then and there, a lot of people are thinking that's seven points, but that's a four-point turnover basically," said Harmon. "Just hold them to three and that really helped us with the momentum going into [halftime]."

When one considers all the collateral damage of Deflategate and the fortunes of the antagonists and protagonists since, it's . . . well, it's telling.

The Colts canned tattletale GM Ryan Grigson on Saturday and are in disarray. The Ravens missed the playoffs again. Owners who fingerwagged and wanted to see the Patriots brought to heel like John Mara, Bob McNair, Jerry Jones and Jerry Richardson have teams that were either bounced from the playoffs or didn't even make them.

And the Patriots are headed to Houston anyway. Despite all their best efforts.

"I think it's a great story, but I think right now our focus is got to go out to Houston in a couple of weeks and try to win it," said Devin McCourty when asked about the revenge angle. "I think that makes the story even better."