Haynesworth: 'I just wanted to play more'


Haynesworth: 'I just wanted to play more'

Albert Haynesworth met with the Tampa Bay media for the first time on Thursday, and while he praised Bill Belichick and the Patriots "system," he indicated that he didn't think he was used properly in New England.

Coach Bill Belichick is a great guy and its a great system, but I just wanted to play more, said Haynesworth, who was picked up off of waivers by the Bucs on Wednesday. I wanted to practice more, get more reps and the more plays I got the better I would get. I just wasnt getting a lot of reps, so they made the decision and let me go.

Haynesworth doesn't exactly have a reputation for playing hard all the time, which makes his plea for more playing time somewhat unbelievable. In fact, he hasn't even always trusted himself to be fully dedicated to football. On Thursday, he said he should've signed with Tampa in 2009, but he thought the mix of good weather and fast boats would have been unhealthy for his career. He signed with Washington instead and managed to cripple his reputation even without the beaches and the boats.

He did have contract incentives to play as much as possible in New England, though, and his attitude seemed to have changed for the better with the Patriots as compared to how he acted while with the Redskins. Regardless, the Bucs know they picked up a player with plenty of baggage.

Tampa Bay GM Mark Dominik was asked by Albert Breer of NFL.com if Haynesworth had a short leash with his new team.

Sure it is, Dominik said. He does have history, of course. But at the end of the day, you talk to anyone in the NFL, week to week, and you know you can be the hero one week, and be the villain the next. Its tough for any player under that scrutiny. But thats the nature of our business. Hes gonna have a shorter leash, but if hes prepared and ready to play, hell play.

In fact, Dominik liked what he saw from Haynesworth in the six games he played for New England.

I saw disruption, Dominik said. I saw strength, a finisher, a guy with the ability to put a lot of pressure on an offense. Hes still able to be a penetrating force. He can hit it and go. I didnt see as much dogging it, but I did see the last play, where he played a 1-gap technique, and I can see why it got them frustrated. He opened up the run lane, and Brandon Jacobs walked in the end zone. That said, I didnt see a guy that didnt care. He battled and competed. I think hes worthy of an opportunity.

Haynesworth was asked about that play in the third quarter of last week's Patriots loss to the Giants. He was tossed aside like a 350-pound rag doll by the Giants guard David Diehl, but Haynesworth insists he hadn't given up on the play.

To me, any time youre on the football field youve got another guy trying to knock your head off. Youre not going to play? Thats just not me, Haynesworth said. Thats why I always play hard because Im my kids role model and I just want to fight and to show them to always keep fighting no matter what it is.

Geno Smith has torn ACL; Ryan Fitzpatrick to start for Jets


Geno Smith has torn ACL; Ryan Fitzpatrick to start for Jets

The Jets’ quarterback situation took a comically typical turn Monday, as Ryan Fitzpatrick will be under center after an MRI revealed that Geno Smith has a torn ACL. 

After starting New York’s first six games of the season, Fitzpatrick was demoted to backup for Sunday’s game against the Ravens. Smith was injured on a sack by Baltimore’s Matt Judon, forcing Fitzpatrick back into action. 

After leading the Jets to a 24-16 win, Fitzpatrick made his dissatisfaction with being benched known. 

“The biggest thing in this game in order to last, is to have belief in yourself,” Fitzpatrick said in his postgame press conference. “Because when the owner stops believing in you and the GM stops believing in you and the coaches stop believing in you, sometimes all you have is yourself. That’s something that I’ve had to deal with before. That’s something I’m dealing with now.”

On the season, Fitzpatrick has completed 136 of 237 passes for 1,561 yards with six touchdowns and a league-leading 11 interceptions. 

Belichick: Kickers are like golfers; have to hit driver, sand wedge, 5-iron


Belichick: Kickers are like golfers; have to hit driver, sand wedge, 5-iron

In searching for answers on what might be going on with Patriots kicker Stephen Gostkowski, coach Bill Belichick was asked on Monday if there was any chance that Gostkowski's mechanics on kickoffs may be affecting his field goals. With the new touchback rule encouraging the Patriots to use more "pop-up" kicks to the goal line this season, might Gostkowski's swing have been altered?

Belichick said that the two plays are separate and that the Patriots expect Gostkowski to be able to execute a whole series of different types of kicks as part of his job.

"Well, I think they’re definitely different," Belichick said on a conference call. "I don’t think there’s any question about that. I mean, it would be like a golfer. You’ve got to be able to hit a sand wedge. You’ve got to be able to hit a five-iron. You’ve got to be able to drive. You’ve got to be able to putt.

"That’s what kickers and punters do. There’s plus-50 punts, there’s field goals, there’s kickoffs, there’s backed-up punts, there’s punts against a heavy rush, there’s punts against a six-man box where the gunners both are getting double-teamed. And just like golf, there’s wind conditions and not wind conditions and so forth. So it’s not like like you’re standing out there in a driving range and just banging the ball away every time. Especially on place kicks, you’re dealing with a center and a holder and timing on the play. It’s not like you’re just placing the ball down there on a tee and kicking it like you are a golf ball or a kickoff.

"Yeah, they’re definitely different, and whether it’s a punter or a kicker you’re talking about, they have to master different skills, different kicks, different types of kicks, different things that are specific to their position, just like every other player and every other athlete, for the most part, has to do. If you’re a basketball player, you just can’t shoot free throws. You’ve got to be able to make some other shots, too. That’s part of the position, being able to do the things that are required of that position, and they’re not all the same. I don’t think they’re all the same for anybody."

Belichick was also asked about how Gostkowski is coached. There are position-specific coaches with every NFL franchise, but when it comes to special teams, there is typically a special-teams coordinator and little else. There is no kicking coach, generally, nor a position coach dedicated to punting or snapping. 

Belichick said that he feels the team has enough support in place, starting with special teams coach Joe Judge, in order to help Gostkowski through his difficult stretch.

"I think Joe’s very knowledgable about the techniques of kicking," Belichick said. "I know when I became a special teams coach and coached special teams for many years as an assistant coach, and I continue to be involved with it as a head coach, that’s one of the things I had to learn. I had to learn how to coach those individual specialists, the snappers, the kickers, the punters, the returners. I don’t think it’s any different than coaching any other position. Things you don’t know, you need to learn. The things you do know, you need to be able to teach to the players, however you acquire that information.

"Some of that certainly comes from the players, especially when you coach good players at the position that you’re coaching, you can learn a lot from them, just like I learned a lot from many of the players that I coached. Going back to people like Dave Jennings as a punts or Carl Banks or Lawrence Taylor or Pepper [Johnson], guys like that, as linebackers with the Giants. However you acquire that information, you acquire it and you have to be able to convey it and teach it to the players and recognize technique or judgment.

"There’s a whole host of things that go into performance, but all the things that are related to those; be able to figure out which ones are the most important and which ones need to be corrected and so forth. I think Joe’s very knowledgeable on that, as was Scott O’Brien. I have a lot of experience with that myself. That’s what coaching is. You don’t know, then you’ve got to find out. Nobody knows everything. No coach knows everything about every position. Maybe a guy’s played it for a decade, he might be well-versed in that position. But I’d say for the most of the rest of us that haven’t done that, things you don’t know, you’ve got to learn, you’ve got to find out, you’ve got to figure them out."