Former Pats coach Brown shoots self, hospitalized

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Former Pats coach Brown shoots self, hospitalized

GRANGER, Ind. -- Former Notre Dame football defensive coordinator and NFL player Corwin Brown was taken from his home Friday night with a self-inflicted gunshot wound after a nearly seven-hour standoff, police said.

St. Joseph County Metro Homicide Commander Tim Corbett said Friday night he did not know whether Brown's injuries were life-threatening.

Police say they heard gunshots inside the home shortly after they arrived about 1 p.m. in response to a reported domestic dispute. Brown's wife and children exited the house sometime later and police say they began trying to talk him out using cellphones and a bullhorn.

Police said Brown, who was a tri-captain of the Michigan football team in 1992, asked to talk to several friends during the standoff. Shortly before it ended, someone could be heard saying through the bullhorn: "Be a Michigan man today. Step up to your obligation."

Several seconds later the person said: "Please don't let me down. Please!"

Moments later a fire truck and ambulance rushed to the front of the house. The ambulance left moments later.

Police would not identify the person who had been talking to Brown.

Police said Brown's wife, Melissa, had a bruise on her head when she left the house earlier in the day. Their children were not hurt.

Police could be heard urging Brown, 41, throughout the day to give up or to give them a call. "We'd appreciate it if you'd let us know you're OK," one officer said through the bullhorn.

Sgt. Matt Blank, a St. Joseph County police spokesman, said Brown came out of the house several times during the standoff only to go back inside.

"Just calm down and put your hands in the air," a police officer said when he came out about 4:45 p.m. Several moments later, Brown could be spotted inside in a window closing the blinds.

Blank said no shots were fired by police during the standoff.

Officers blocked off entrances to the subdivision about 10 miles northwest of the Notre Dame campus in South Bend, and blocked access to the Brown home from about three houses away. Police at one point provided an escort as a family left their home next door.

Brown was drafted in the fourth round of the 1993 NFL draft out of the University of Michigan, where he was co-captain and all-Big Ten his senior year. Brown played eight seasons in the NFL as a defensive back with the Patriots, Jets and Detroit Lions, from 1993-2000.

Before coming to Notre Dame, Brown was an assistant with the New York Jets and at the University of Virginia.

He was Notre Dame's defensive coordinator from 2007 to 2009. He was fired along with most of the rest of the staff when Charlie Weis was fired. He coached defensive backs with the New England Patriots last season but was not retained.

Another big swing and miss from NYDN's Manish Mehta on the Patriots

Another big swing and miss from NYDN's Manish Mehta on the Patriots

Every few months, our buddy Manish Mehta gets suitably bored or his bosses at the New York Daily News get sufficiently impatient with him and he goes off with some prediction that winds up being the absolute direct opposite of what actually happens.

He would be like the drippy-nosed kid at his own birthday party trying to bust open the piñata for an uncomfortable length of time. Except, eventually, somebody takes pity on that kid. With Manish, nobody ever feels bad and he’s left out there swinging long after the party’s over and everyone’s gone home.

Tom Brady’s suspension has provided multiple opportunities for Manish to walk into screen doors.

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First, after Brady bailed in July on taking his suspension to the SCOTUS, Mehta spun it forward and said the Jets would be looking real good after four games with Jimmy Garoppolo driving the bus.

Brady will be in full-fledged F.U. mode by the time he faces the Jets for the first time in Week 12. But what if the Patriots start off winless or 1-3 with Garoppolo? Will Brady's greatness be enough to overcome such a sluggish start given that his team has the second toughest strength of schedule in the AFC (behind the Jets and just ahead of the Bills and Dolphins)?

"I feel like, in this division, you got to win 10-plus games, maybe 11-plus games," Decker said. "That means you almost have to go perfect the rest of the year (after a 1-3 start). You can be in a situation where you play a hard Sunday game and, all of sudden, you got a (quick turnaround) on a Thursday night. … You can factor those things in and make a case that it's more difficult to go on a run after starting 1-3."

After the Patriots started 2-0 and Garoppolo broke, Mehta waded in again.

Not even the greatest football mind of the generation will be able to wiggle out of this jam.

The Patriots face a new reality now that Jimmy Garoppolo wrecked his shoulder on Sunday: The Evil Empire will be looking up at the Jets in the AFC East standings when Tom Brady returns….

(Jacoby) Brissett has been a NFL player for FIVE MONTHS. He'll have THREE DAYS to prepare for his first start. Belichick is brilliant, but let's be realistic. He's not going to climb this mountain.

Friday, Manish made a Mehta Culpa in the New York Daily News and on CSN's SportsNet Central. His prediction of Brissett going bellyup and the Patriots being behind the Jets by the time Brady made his return was, “one giant swing and a miss,” wrote Mehta.

“I was wrong like pre-Socratic philosophers, who thought the world was flat. I was wrong like the Chicago Daily Tribune headline writer, who prematurely buried Truman in '48. I was wrong like Lex Luthor, who thought he could destroy Superman three or four hundred times.

Mehta got an avalanche of “You’re a ******* moooooorrrrrrooooonnnnn!!!!” tweets Thursday night. This was his blanket attempt to say, “Yes. Yes I am.”

And for a second, you worry. Is Manish done? Has he taken his blindfold off, put down his stick and gone into the house for good? No more wild swings and misses?

And then you realize it is his raison d’etre. He’ll be back. And – like this guy – he’ll be gloriously mistaken.