Felger: These Pats are defenseless

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Felger: These Pats are defenseless

By Michael Felger

The instinct is to say that the Patriots' defense is a "work in progress." Or that it's simply a developing unit going through some growing pains. Or some such cliche.

But let's be real.

The unit stinks right now.

The Pats weren't just inconsistent on defense in their 38-30 win over Buffalo on Sunday at Gillette Stadium. They were wretched. Do you understand how bad the Bills' offense wasis? The Bills scored seven points a week ago in Green Bay. They opened the season with 10 points at home versus Miami. They averaged just over 15 points a game in 2009 (23rd in the league).

And on Sunday they were the greatest show on turf.

The Pats the last few years have made a habit of allowing career days to mediocre quarterbacks, so this story is really nothing new.

But, somehow, this felt worse than usual.

The Pats couldn't stop the run (the Bills averaged 5.6-yards per carry), couldn't stop the pass (Ryan Fitzpatrick completed 71 percent of his throws) and couldn't stay clean on kickoffs (C.J. Spiller's 95-yard kickoff return kept the Bills in the lead in the second quarter). They missed tackles (did you see Roscoe Parrish bounce off Brandon Meriweather, Jonathan Wilhite and Gary Guyton to covert a third-and-18 in the first quarter?), they blew contain (did you see Jermaine Cunningham and Darius Butler get sucked inside on Spiller's 19-yard run in the second quarter?), and they allowed Bills' receivers huge amounts of real estate (take your pick).

Time and again, Tom Brady and the offense put the defense in position to put the game out of reach -- and they failed nearly every time.

The Pats' two fourth-quarter interceptions?

Please. They were gifts.

The first came when Fitzpatrick overshot his intended target at the goal line and the ball lofted perfectly into the hands of Pat Chung. Can of corn. The degree of difficultly was only slightly higher two series later when Fitzpatrick again threw high, this time into the waiting arms of the massively overrated Meriweather.

You can say the Pats "made plays" on those snaps, but I would beg to differ. They were more like fair catches.

Other than that, the Pats forced just one punt on the day. One. From the Bills.

Please note: I believe the Pats' defense is going to get better. I mean, how can it get any worse? The Pats currently rank in the bottom five in the league in points allowed (82 in three games), and Bill Belichick is just too good for the unit to be this bad for this long . . . Right? It's simple logic. At some point, the defense is going to evolve from being atrocious to simply mediocre. Mark it down.

The real questions are: How long is that process going to take; and can the unit ever be more than that?

We'll find out.

For now, it's scary how many players on defense have either flat-lined in their development, or gone in reverse.

Butler has gotten worse. He was removed from the startling lineup on Sunday in favor of Kyle Arrington, who was brutal in his own right.

Meriweather has gotten worse. He was benched last week, only to return to the starting lineup on Sunday and author perhaps the worse defensive play of the day, allowing Spiller to walk into the end zone in the second quarter on a simple bubble screen.

Jerod Mayo finally woke up in this game (nine tackles, one sack and one tackle for a loss), but is he the impact guy you thought he'd be as a rookie? Not yet.

We could go on. Has Jonathan Wilhite improved? No. Terrance Wheatley? Nope. Guyton? Questionable. Ron Brace? I guess, but only because he was at rock bottom to begin with. Chung? Sure. There's one. Name another. It's too early to talk about the rookies, although we have all be encouraged by Devin McCourty. Then again, McCourty gave up another touchdown on Sunday (a 37-yarder to Steve Johnson) and we all felt pretty good about Butler early on, too.

The ultimate success or failure of the Pats' rebuilding project on defense will be determined over the course of the next few years, so we have a ways to go with this story. But if you're concerned about the here and now, if you're still interested in contending for a championship this season, then these questions have more urgency.

When handicaping the division, we always look to the quarterback position and say the Pats have a huge advantage with Brady. And that makes sense. We'd all take him over Fitzpatrick, or Mark Sanchez, or Chad Henne. Hands down.

But here's the bad news.

Every starting quarterback in the division has now had a career day against the Pats. Fitzpatrick completed over 70 percent of his passes for the first time on Sunday. Mark Sanchez threw for three touchdowns for the first time last week and won. Chad Henne went over 300 yards for the first time last December and won.

In other words, what would you rather have: Brady versus the Jets defense, or Sanchez versus the Pats defense? Based on the scoreboard (the Jets have won two of the last three), it's hard to take Brady -- as crazy as that sounds.

Of course, the more pertinent question comes a week from today: Brady versus the Dolphins' defense, or Henne versus the Pats defense?

Again, we'll find out.

Read Felger's report card on Tuesday. Email him HERE and read the mailbag on Thursday. Listen to him on the radio weekdays, 2-6 p.m. on 98.5 the Sports Hub.

Affleck offers passionate Brady defense when asked about Deflategate

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Affleck offers passionate Brady defense when asked about Deflategate

When the topic of Deflategate was broached on HBO's Any Given Wednesday with Bill Simmons, which debuted this week, Ben Affleck became all kinds of fired up.

"What they did was suspend Tom Brady for four days for not giving them his [expletive] cellphone," Affleck said. "I would never give an organization as leak-prone as the NFL my [expletive] cellphone . . . so you can just look through my emails and listen to my voicemails?"

Affleck grew up in Cambridge, Mass. and is a passionate Patriots fan. He made no attempts to hide his fandom, and his appreciation for Brady, as he and Simmons (also a Patriots fan) discussed the football-deflation controversy that has now lasted well over a year. 

Affleck, who said he would want to cast himself as Brady if ever a Deflategate movie was made, harped on the fact that the league wanted Brady to turn over his phone. 

"Maybe Tom Brady is so [expletive] classy and such a [expletive] gentleman," Affleck said, "that he doesn’t want people to know that he may have reflected on his real opinion on some of his co-workers."

Brady is waiting for the Second Circuit to make a decision as to whether or not it will rehear his case against the NFL. Earlier this offseason, the Second Circuit reinstated Brady's four-game suspension issued by the league when a three-judge panel ruled in favor of the NFL, 2-1. 

Pro Football Talk wrote on Thursday that a decision from the Second Circuit could come at any time. If the rehearding request is denied, Brady could then take the case to the Supreme Court. Should the Second Circuit grant Brady a rehearing, his suspension would be delaed until the court reached a decision. In that case, Brady could potentially play the entire 2016 season before a decision came to pass. 

Brady posts high school essay to Facebook on living in his sisters' shadow

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Brady posts high school essay to Facebook on living in his sisters' shadow

Tom Brady wasn't always the most famous person in his family. Growing up, his sisters were the accomplished athletes in the household. 

For his latest Throwback Thursday style Facebook post, Brady published a pair of photos of an old high school essay that he wrote in the fall of his senior year in 1994. It was titled "The way my sisters influenced me."

I found an essay I wrote in 1994... I love my big sisters! #tbt. Thanks for the good grade Mr Stark!

Posted by Tom Brady on Thursday, June 23, 2016

In it, he discusses some of the difficulties of growing up with three older sisters and no brothers. Because Maureen, Julie and Nancy Brady had achieved so much in softball, basketball and soccer, Brady -- or "Tommy," as he signed his paper -- had trouble getting noticed. 

Of course, it wouldn't be long before Brady was headed from San Mateo, California to Ann Arbor, Michigan in order to play football for the Wolverines. He probably had no trouble garnering attention by then. Still, it's funny to read about how he felt overlooked in his youth. 

He closed the essay explaining that he knew his sisters would always provide him support throughout his life, adding, "hopefully, just maybe, one day people will walk up to them and say, 'Aren't you Tommy's sister?' or 'Hey where is your brother?' Maybe . . . "

If the Brady sisters didn't get those kinds of comments by the time the baby of the family was given an 'A' for his English assignment, it probably didn't take long before they did. About seven years later, he took over as the starting quarterback of the Patriots.