Curran's 42 lines on 21 Patriot issues

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Curran's 42 lines on 21 Patriot issues

By Tom E. Curran
CSNNE.com Patriots Insider Follow @tomecurran
The receptions record Wes Welker tied on Sunday was set by Troy Brown on September 22, 2002. Brown caught 16 passes against Kansas City and might've had more but he was hurt on that final reception, which came with 7:27 left in the game.

Taylor Price? You're time is nigh.
Vince Wilfork beat feet out of the locker room Sunday. He and safety Sergio Brown were on their way out before the media even got in. Chad Ochocinco looked like his left shoulder was killing him as he put on his shirt after the game. He dismissed a question about whether it was injured. Ocho's egregious drop came with 8:18 left in the game. New England needed almost five more minutes to complete that drive and tie it with a fourth-down reception by Welker. In other words, the maddening final three minutes when the Patriots saw Buffalo go into a stall and kill their chance for one last possession? Trace it to Ocho. There comes a point where we all stop nodding and sympathizing about how incredibly hard it must be to process an NFL playbook and a sophisticated passing offense. That time came Sunday when Ocho needed a guide dog to get lined up on a few plays, rounded off his routes and dropped throws flag football receivers all over the USA were hauling in on Sunday morning. Last week was the first time Ochocinco got surly with the media. He said on Wednesday he wasn't talking because the media thinks it has all the answers. Randy Moss got docked 25K for refusing to talk to the media in Minnesota last year. It was the same thing he pulled in New England but we never made a big deal of it. Had this passing statistic up on last week's Quick Slants. On the list of single-season passing leaders, you have to go all the way to the 34th most prolific single-season passer to find a guy who won a Super Bowl throwing for stupid yards (Peyton Manning, 2006). Tom Brady is on pace to shatter the record set by Dan Marino in 1984 (5,084). Brady had thrown for 1,327 through three games and is on a pace to throw for 7,077 yards. The observation that the Patriots can't cover has been made repeatedly. We need to get to the why of it. Here are the reasons: 1) No pressure from four-man rush means that a man-to-man playing secondary is going to get roasted; 2) awful man-to-man technique from corners at the line of scrimmage; 3) the secondary plays scared. Bills receiver David Nelson was very good talking about the difficulties of playing man-to-man, which is something the Patriots have done more of this season. Read that stuff here. I'm on record as saying Wes Welker is brilliant at what he does but not unique -- slot receivers with similar skills exist. I now add this caveat: his physical and mental toughness, comeptitiveness and chemistry with Tom Brady do make him unique. What could Sergio Brown have done differently to avoid the end zone pass interference call that killed the Pats Sunday? Simply put his hands up and made Nelson fight through him to get back to the ball; hugging is never a solid option. The Patriots' linebackers have got to do a better job in coverage. Through three games, running backs have caught 29 passes for 276 yards on them. Nobody wants to hear about it but the absence of Myron Pryor, Mike Wright, Albert Haynesworth and Patrick Chung on Sunday was a big deal. No pressure in the middle of the defensive line; poor tackling at the back. Seeing Robert Kraft chatting with urban Meyer at the West Virginia-LSU game on Saturday brought to mind a murmur I heard a year or two ago. That when Bill Belichick's had enough of coaching, he'll move upstairs and Meyer will be his on-field successor. Richard Seymour figures to be highly motivated this week. First chance to meet up with the team that traded him back in 2009. My theory that the lockout would cause offenses to lag behind defenses in the early part of the season? Bad theory. Tom E. Curran can be reached at tcurran@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Tom on Twitter at http:twitter.comtomecurran

Affleck offers passionate Brady defense when asked about Deflategate

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Affleck offers passionate Brady defense when asked about Deflategate

When the topic of Deflategate was broached on HBO's Any Given Wednesday with Bill Simmons, which debuted this week, Ben Affleck became all kinds of fired up.

"What they did was suspend Tom Brady for four days for not giving them his [expletive] cellphone," Affleck said. "I would never give an organization as leak-prone as the NFL my [expletive] cellphone . . . so you can just look through my emails and listen to my voicemails?"

Affleck grew up in Cambridge, Mass. and is a passionate Patriots fan. He made no attempts to hide his fandom, and his appreciation for Brady, as he and Simmons (also a Patriots fan) discussed the football-deflation controversy that has now lasted well over a year. 

Affleck, who said he would want to cast himself as Brady if ever a Deflategate movie was made, harped on the fact that the league wanted Brady to turn over his phone. 

"Maybe Tom Brady is so [expletive] classy and such a [expletive] gentleman," Affleck said, "that he doesn’t want people to know that he may have reflected on his real opinion on some of his co-workers."

Brady is waiting for the Second Circuit to make a decision as to whether or not it will rehear his case against the NFL. Earlier this offseason, the Second Circuit reinstated Brady's four-game suspension issued by the league when a three-judge panel ruled in favor of the NFL, 2-1. 

Pro Football Talk wrote on Thursday that a decision from the Second Circuit could come at any time. If the rehearding request is denied, Brady could then take the case to the Supreme Court. Should the Second Circuit grant Brady a rehearing, his suspension would be delaed until the court reached a decision. In that case, Brady could potentially play the entire 2016 season before a decision came to pass. 

Brady posts high school essay to Facebook on living in his sisters' shadow

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Brady posts high school essay to Facebook on living in his sisters' shadow

Tom Brady wasn't always the most famous person in his family. Growing up, his sisters were the accomplished athletes in the household. 

For his latest Throwback Thursday style Facebook post, Brady published a pair of photos of an old high school essay that he wrote in the fall of his senior year in 1994. It was titled "The way my sisters influenced me."

I found an essay I wrote in 1994... I love my big sisters! #tbt. Thanks for the good grade Mr Stark!

Posted by Tom Brady on Thursday, June 23, 2016

In it, he discusses some of the difficulties of growing up with three older sisters and no brothers. Because Maureen, Julie and Nancy Brady had achieved so much in softball, basketball and soccer, Brady -- or "Tommy," as he signed his paper -- had trouble getting noticed. 

Of course, it wouldn't be long before Brady was headed from San Mateo, California to Ann Arbor, Michigan in order to play football for the Wolverines. He probably had no trouble garnering attention by then. Still, it's funny to read about how he felt overlooked in his youth. 

He closed the essay explaining that he knew his sisters would always provide him support throughout his life, adding, "hopefully, just maybe, one day people will walk up to them and say, 'Aren't you Tommy's sister?' or 'Hey where is your brother?' Maybe . . . "

If the Brady sisters didn't get those kinds of comments by the time the baby of the family was given an 'A' for his English assignment, it probably didn't take long before they did. About seven years later, he took over as the starting quarterback of the Patriots.