Curran: A thought-filled drive

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Curran: A thought-filled drive

By Tom E. Curran
CSNNE.com

BUFFALO - The black Reebok baseball hat on Bill Belichick's head didn't quite go with the tan overcoat he was wearing.So kill him, the guy's not a fashion plate.What the lid said meant more than how it looked: 2010 AFC East Champions, New England Patriots. It's only a step. And while the Patriots weren't popping corks ("mellow" is how Deion Branch described the locker room), the fact the Commandant would see fit to pop it on his head before boarding the bus to go to Rochester announced to his team that it meant something. With the win comes decisions. And that leads off five things to chew on for today.
(I'm writing this while riding in the back of a Chevy HHR rolling back from Buffalo with the great Mike Reiss and soon-to-be-great Mike Rodek, both of ESPNBoston.com. I freakin' love my wireless card.) 1. PLAY OR NAY THIS SUNDAY, HEY!It will be this week's debate. Should the Patriots - with nothing to play for against Miami - sit their stars or roll 'em out there? Let's squish the drama now. The eight words we'll be hearing in relation to this will be: "Everyone will prepare to play the entire game." There is no advantage to tapping anybody on the shoulder and telling them they don't have to prepare this week. After Miami there will be no opponent to prepare for. It will be a week of fundamentals, self-scouting and long-term preparation. You don't want consecutive weeks of not being on game plans. Get 'em all ready, then shut 'em down after two series. 2. BRADY LOVES STUPID ROOKIESHere's yet another flip-flop from 2009. While the veterans dotting last year's roster may have eye-rolled at Bill Belichick's instructions and not given the necessary buy-in, that's not the case this year with a much younger team. "The rookies don't really know anything," said Tom Brady. "Really, what you tell them is what they believe. They don't look two weeks ahead. They're just not smart enough or experienced enough to do that. The veterans are just like, 'This is what you do.' And that's what they do. Having those guys like Aaron Hernandez, Rob Gronkowski and Devin McCourty, they just think this is just the way it is. They've really listened to the veterans, listened to the guys at their positions and listened to our coach."3. YO, RANDOM QUESTION!!Hey Tom, Enjoy reading your work. Relocated Pats fan (and everything Boston for that matter as I grew up in Lexington, MA) hoping to see the Pats in Arlington this year. Love your "Quick Slants" work as well.Two quick questions:1) Is Hernadez's injury serious?2) Will Taylor Price ever get on the field? Is he in the chateau bow wow as Bob Ryan is known to say?Safe travels home.
Gene IsottiGene, Thanks for the kind words. I'm tremendously talented. I don't think Aaron Hernandez' injury is a big deal. He practiced a couple of times last week and was in the locker room. Those guys are under lock-and-key if they're really messed up. He'll be good to go for the playoffs. As for Price, this year appears to be an apprenticeship. The time he missed during mini-camp because of the college graduation rule really set him back. He'll be a factor at some point. 4. WRIGHT MUST REALLY BE WRONGThe fact we haven't seen Mike Wright on the field in more than a month is becoming a big concern. Out a month with a concussion? You have to start wondering about his long-term health. He's their best interior pass-rusher when healthy and his playoff status would seem to be in serious jeopardy. 5. HAVE TO DRIVE NOWReiss has to take a call for ESPN at 3:30 and now I have to drive. So you get four. Sorry.

Tom E. Curran can be reached at tcurran@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Tom on Twitter at http:twitter.comtomecurran

Curran: Even after all that's gone down, sun still shines for Brady

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Curran: Even after all that's gone down, sun still shines for Brady

I wasn’t looking to get nostalgic last Thursday. But I got that little twist in the tummy. It was a song that did it. It reminded me of how things were and how things are.

The song was “Beautiful Day” by U2. It was, for a few years, practically a Patriots anthem. It was the first song the legendary Irish band played during its halftime set at Super Bowl 36, a mini-concert that was sad, hopeful, jubilant and defiant all at once. 

It’s not hard to recall what things felt like in early February of 2002.

Five months earlier, the September 11 attacks stripped away the sense of security and insulation we'd come to enjoy as our birthright. Anger, indignation, unity, national pride and a sense of resolve emerged that probably hadn’t been felt in 60 years.

But our new reality also meant a palpable sense of unease, too. Vulnerability.

It was at sporting events in the wake of 9/11 that we got an introduction to how things had changed and how we’d been changed. Armed security, bomb-sniffing dogs, personal searches and patdowns fueled our new trepidation. But once inside, a strength-in-numbers feeling emerged. The vulnerability was replaced by a near-universal sense of community and patriotism. The focus was on what we had in common as Americans, our shared interest in being safe and maintaining who we were.

The feeling isn’t quite the same now, is it? A lot’s changed.

It was near the end of that Thursday practice that the song came on. Blaring. It was supposed to replicate crowd noise during an 11-on-11 drill but it had the additional impact of causing me to reflect on that time and Tom Brady.

Brady was standing behind the offense watching rookie Jacoby Brissett take the reps at quarterback. Next to Brady was Jimmy Garoppolo.

Brissett was 9 years old when U2 played at that Super Bowl while Brady sat in the visitor’s locker room at the Superdome, improbably in possession of a 14-3 lead and 30 minutes from taking the first step on the road from “cool story” to “legend.” Garoppolo was 11.

How many rookie quarterbacks has Brady seen come and go since he was a rookie himself in 2000? How many backups has he dispatched since Brady himself was a backup in 2001? A lot.

He’s so far removed from the 24-year-old kid who, upon winning the MVP in that Super Bowl, put his hands to his head in beaming disbelief.  Does he think about that game? That atmosphere? That song?

That was an amazing day. I remember the military presence all week in New Orleans and on Super Bowl Sunday especially. Soldiers with M-16s surveyed and patrolled all along inside the barriers set up outside the Superdome. Inside, the Patriots were the ultimate Cinderella team going against a dynasty-in-waiting. They were -- hard as it is to believe now almost 15 years later -- beloved nationally. And the country didn’t hate Boston fans then, either. They mostly felt bad for us because of the constant sports heartbreak.

There were emotional juxtapositions that day -- from U2's moving halftime tribute to those killed on 9/11 to the Patriots stunning win -- that by the end felt cathartic. It was like an Irish wake.   

Brady doesn’t beam too often anymore. At least not publically. He’s got 17 years in the league, 16 minicamps, four Super Bowl wins, two Super Bowl losses, three Super Bowl MVPs and two league MVPs under his belt. The novelty’s worn off some.

There’s also the matter of the NFL itself deciding it would bring the franchise that went from Cinderella to Godzilla to heel by over-prosecuting the team in 2007 and trumping up charges against Brady himself in 2014.

Can’t beat ‘em? Delegitimize ‘em.

For Brady to find himself a reviled athlete, a target of the league office, a media piñata must have been beyond comprehension.

But on Thursday, there was a sign that maybe he’s making some peace with that, too.

The person who was at a loss for words in an uncomfortable 30-minute press conference a year ago January, who set his jaw and refused comment last summer walking in and out of New York courthouses, who welled up in September talking about the impact the investigation had on Jim McNally and John Jastremski . . . that guy actually walked past the media on Thursday when practice was over.

He didn’t stop. He only smiled and waved a few hellos. But compared to last year, when he’d exit the practice fields 100 yards from the media and didn’t speak from the Super Bowl until September, this was a departure.

There is no bigger point I’m trying to make here about football, patriotism, party politics, the decline of civility or the Patriots being a national treasure or blight.

All this was just something that occurred to me last Thursday. Which just so happened to be the first legitimately beautiful day of the year. 

Big weekend: Timberlake likes Gronk's moves; Edelman cries 'Free Brady'

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Big weekend: Timberlake likes Gronk's moves; Edelman cries 'Free Brady'

Rob Gronkowski has never been one to keep his dance moves from the public eye. While he's received a wide range of critiques -- the body-slamming of one of his brothers in Las Vegas was not quite as well-received as his girating on a Duck Boat early last year -- the compliment he received this weekend will be hard to beat.

In Nantucket with teammate Julian Edelman, Gronkowski got on stage to dance to Justin Timberlake's new song "Can't Stop the Feeling." When the artist found the video on Twitter, he gave the Patriots tight end a social-media thumbs up in the form of the hashtag "#thosemovestho".

Gronkowski had an eventful day for himself -- with camera phones seemingly recording his every move -- as did Edelman, who began the weekend in Boston at the Boston Calling music festival to scream "Free Brady!"

Seahawks taking their cues from Patriots on how to use Browner

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Seahawks taking their cues from Patriots on how to use Browner

Brandon Browner helped the Patriots win a Super Bowl with his physical play in the secondary, highlighting his one-year stint with the team by making one of the most important jams at the line of scrimmage in the history of the NFL, clearing space at the goal line for Malcolm Butler's championship-saving interception.

One season later, as a member of the Saints, he had a tough time. He committed 24 penalties (most in the league), allowed 17.2 yards per catch (second-most in the league among players who played at least 75 percent of their teams' snaps), and quarterbacks had a rating of 122.5 when throwing in his direction (worst in the league, according to Pro Football Focus). 

Browner was released after one year in New Orleans -- though he was happy to point out to Saints fans on Instagram that he made good money for that one year -- and has been since been signed by Seattle, where he was a member of their vaunted Legion of Boom secondary from 2011-13. 

Seahawks coach Pete Carroll told ESPN that Browner will be used this season similarly to the way he was used at times in New England. Rather than forcing him to play on the outside in man-to-man coverage, he'll be in the box as a safety, where his physicality will be best served. He'll still be asked to cover from time to time, but those assignments will pit him primarily against tight ends -- something Patriots coach Bill Belichick liked to do in 2014 -- instead of quicker, smaller wideouts. 

"He was wide open to it," Carroll said of the positional change. "I had the chance to see him play in positions like he's being asked to play now when he was in New England, and we saw some really good things we thought we could mix into our stuff, and he's very much looked the part. But I really think it's about him; we like the guy so much."

How the shift will work remains to be seen. Working inside the box is something he's done before with the Patriots, but now it's a full-time gig. 

"Being on the outside, it’s more of a man-to-man concept: You’re a corner on an island," Browner said. "Being in that box, you’re accounted for from the linemen in the run. You’ll get some run keys from the end man on the line of scrimmage. Things are just a little different. But you’re a football player in there. Playing corner, it’s more of a one-on-one thing. We’re playing basketball out there on that island. When you’re in that box, that’s football, I think."