Brandt on CBA: 'It's always that split'

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Brandt on CBA: 'It's always that split'

By TomE. Curran
CSNNE.com
While in Indianapolis for the NFL Scouting Combine, I sat down for a multi-part conversation with National Football Post president Andrew Brandt on theongoing NFL labor strife. Brandt's been on both sides of the labor issue. He was an NFL player agent (Adam Vinatieri was one of his clients) and he was a vice president with the Green Bay Packers from 1999 to 2008, negotiating contracts and managing the salary cap. He was with the Packers when the last CBA was extended in 2006. Look, it's not as much fun as breaking down the 40 times of the top running back prospects. But if you're an NFL fan, this is like the vegetables in your diet. It's good for you. And we kept it as conversational and easy-to-understand as possible. This is the first installment in which Brandt explains that the split of the revenue is "always" the biggest issue. For a breakdown of all the issues, have a look at my "Idiot's Guide to the NFL Labor Impasse."
Tom E. Curran canbe reached at tcurran@comcastsportsnet.com.Follow Tom on Twitter at http:twitter.comtomecurran

Roethlisberger responds to Edelman comments: 'We've got our trophies'

Roethlisberger responds to Edelman comments: 'We've got our trophies'

On Monday, Julian Edelman took a light shot at the Steelers when asked about Antonio Brown streaming Mike Tomlin’s postgame speech on Facebook Live. 

"That's how that team is run," Edelman said on WEEI Monday. "I personally don't think that would be something that would happen in our locker room, but hey, whatever. Some people like red and some people like blue. Some people like tulips and some people like roses. Whatever."

Ben Roethlisberger, one of the players who was speaking during Brown’s video, was asked to respond to Edelman’s comments Wednesday. He did so by saying the Steelers are run in a manner that’s gotten them six Super Bowl championships. 

“I don’t think I need to speak much,” Roethlisberger said. “We’ve got our trophies out there. I’ve got owners that I think are the best in the business. They’re family to us, and I’m sure if he talked to his owner, he would say the same thing about the Rooneys. Anybody in here in the football world or the regular world that owns the Rooneys knows what they stand for. It’s a blessing to call them a family.”

Brown, whose actions were admonished by Tomlin Tuesday, could be fined if the NFL determines that he violated the league’s social media policy. The policy is as follows: 

"The use of social media by coaches, players, and other club football operations personnel is prohibited on game day (including halftime) beginning 90 minutes before kickoff until after the post-game locker room is open to the media and players have first fulfilled their obligation to be available to the news media who are at the game."

Brown apologizes for 'distraction' caused by Facebook Live video

Brown apologizes for 'distraction' caused by Facebook Live video

Pittsburgh Steelers wideout Antonio Brown posted an apology on social media Tuesday night for his Facebook Live video that has caused a stir over the last few days.

"I let my emotions and genuine excitement get the best of me, and I wanted to share that moment with our fans," said Brown in a statement on his Twitter. ""It was wrong of me to do, against team and NFL policy, and I have apologized to Coach Tomlin and my teammates for my actions.

"I'm sorry to them for letting it become a distraction and something that they've had to answer questions about while we're preparing for a big game on Sunday."

Steelers coach Mike Tomlin said on Tuesday that he has “absolutely no worries on the video's effect" on Sunday's game against the Patriots, but it was "selfish and inconsiderate" of his star wide receiver.

Brown could still be fined for violating the league's social-media policy. The policy states that players, coaches and football operations personnel are banned from using social media on game days 90 minutes before kickoff, during games, and before "traditional media interviews."