Brady looks at why his interceptions are on rise

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Brady looks at why his interceptions are on rise

FOXBORO -- Forget the passing yards and touchdown passes, the most amazing statistic Tom Brady's rolled up as a quarterback is his TD pass-to-interception rate.

Coming into this season, he'd thrown 261 touchdowns and 103 interceptions in 153 games. In 2007 and 2010 combined, he threw 86 touchdowns and 12 interceptions.

He's never thrown more than 14 interceptions in a season. Last year, he set the record for consecutive attempts without throwing it to the wrong team.

Compare and contrast:

Drew Brees was 235-131 coming into this year. He threw 22 picks last year.

Eli(te) Manning? 156 and 113. He threw 25 picks last year.

Peyton Manning? 399 and 198. He threw 17 picks last year.

Ben Roethlisberger? 144 and 86.

Aaron Rodgers? He's one that actually compares with Brady. 97 and 32 entering this year; 24 and 3 so far this season.

But this year, Brady's been on an interception binge. And Sunday's two-pick game against the Giants was actually worse than Brady's four-pick game against the Bills earlier this year. Against New York, Brady hesitated on a Deion Branch slant and threw into converging coverage. On the other pick, Brady looked right then, without checking the area came back and fired in the direction of Rob Gronkowski. Deon Grant intercepted. Against the Bills, tipped passes and undercut routes were the problem and an element of bad luck is in play there.

Brady's got 20 touchdown passes and 10 interceptions. His personal high of 14 seems in danger.

"Just decision-making," Brady said when asked about the interceptions. "Just gotta make better decisions."

Sunday night, the Patriots play a critical game against the Jets. The teams are tied at 5-3 atop the AFC East along with the 5-3 Bills.

"We need to go out there and execute well this week," Brady explained. "Last time we played them we were a bit inconsistent as well even though we scored more than 30 points. I think we can be more consistent."

Over the season's first three weeks, New England's passing offense was mult-pronged. Now it's been trimmed to Wes Welker, Rob Gronkowski, Aaron Hernandez and Deion Branch (all with 50-plus targets). The next highest target is Chad Ochocinco (21).

Asked whether balance between targets is a goal, Brady said, "If they're open, they get it. If they're covered, you throw to someone else. If you put other guys in position and they're open first, they get the ball. Really the guys who are gonna get the ball are the guys who are open. We're not trying to just force the ball. I don't think I ever -- well not ever but -- pick a guy before the play. But usually that doesn't go very well.

"A lot of times you just try to read it out," he added. "You know the route, you know the coverages, you know the matchup, you read it and make your throw using good technique and try to throw the ball with accuracy. We could bring one of you guys out there and throw if we told you where to throw it before the snap."

Don't know how many we'd complete, but sure we could. Actually, if you told us to throw to Ocho, we'd complete about as many as Brady has over the past three weeks. Zero.

The diligent defense of Ochocinco continued Wednesday. And while Senor Nueve receptions has been an unmitigated disappointment in terms of production at least he's trying.

"He is and he's continued to do a great job in practice in the role that he's carved out for himself and he's gonna continue to be out there and hopefully make a few plays for us," said Brady. "One of these days it is really gonna all click for us and the offense is gonna (kick it in)."

Brady nutritional manual goes on sale, features avocado ice cream

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Brady nutritional manual goes on sale, features avocado ice cream

It was only a matter of time, right? You can finally eat the way Tom Brady does now that his nutritional manual has gone on sale. 

The Patriots quarterback excitedly shared the news with his fans Wednesday on Facebook, directing them to his website TB12store.com. There they could find a few snap-shot looks of the laser-etched maple cover -- natural maple, obviously -- and its contents.

I wanted to share with you guys another step toward achieving your peak performance. Check it out you will love it! #ididntcomethisfartoonlycomethisfar

Posted by Tom Brady on Wednesday, May 4, 2016

Brady's description of the $200 manual explains: "TB12™ Nutrition Manual is a limited-edition 'living document' containing information about our core TB12 nutritional philosophies and featuring a library of 89 seasonally-inspired recipes that you can use to support your TB12-aligned nutrition plan.

"The TB12 Nutrition Manual is designed to be modified and expanded over time using its unique screw post binding: as we periodically update this manual with new or modified recipes, we will send additional pages to all purchasers of the manual."

The recipes inside teach readers how to make such dishes as sweet potato gnocchi with escarole, carrot cake and avocado ice cream, the last of which has become one of Brady's most well-known indulgences ever since his "body coach" and business partner Alex Guerrero told the New York Times about it for a profile that was published last year. 

Patriots contract dance is a daunting one

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Patriots contract dance is a daunting one

We are in the Patriots’ silent spring. Aside from the ongoing mud wrestle Tom Brady’s engaged in with the NFL and the noise surrounding that, it’s quiet with the football team.

Minimal personnel outflow. An interesting haul of B-list free agents. A workmanlike draft of players who won’t likely make much impact in their rookie seasons.

But this calm precedes a roster storm the team is facing over the next nine months.

Nine players of major consequence are entering the final year of their contracts. On offense, it’s not a crisis. Right tackle Sebastian Vollmer is the only expiring contract.

Defensively? Different story. Linebackers Donta Hightower and Jamie Collins, defensive ends Rob Ninkovich and Jabaal Sheard, defensive backs Logan Ryan, Duron Harmon and Malcolm Butler (restricted free agent) are all expiring. As is special teams ace and captain Matthew Slater.

But wait, there’s still more. A bunch of the free agent/trade imports the Patriots made are here on one-year deals: tight ends Martellus Bennett and Clay Harbor, defensive linemen Chris Long and Terrance Knighton and guard Jonathan Cooper.

Add in OL Marcus Cannon, RB LeGarrette Blount, DL Alan Branch, WR Aaron Dobson, RB Brandon Bolden, LB Jonathan Freeny, FB James Develin, WR Chris Harper, TE Michael Williams, G Cameron Fleming and lower-tier free agent signings like DT Markus Kuhn, WR Nate Washington, LB Ramon Humber, CB E.J. Biggers and DE Frank Kearse and overall there are 30 (!!) players with expiring deals.

A few of those players won’t even make it through the summer with the team. And the fact others, like Bennett, Long, Knighton, Cooper, Blount and Washington, are on one-year “show us” deals isn’t bad. It’s smart.

But the volume of consequential players – especially on defense – who’ll be looking for new deals means there’s an interesting dance for Bill Belichick and Director of Player Personnel Nick Caserio to engage in.

The Patriots have to do what’s best for their football team. But some of the players whose contracts are up are obligated to do what’s best for themselves business-wise.

And a lot of them are in line for their second contracts. They are facing what will probably be the most pivotal financial period in their lives over the next few months.

Consider a player like Jamie Collins. A second-round pick in 2013, his initial contract was for $3.76M. You take out taxes, agent fees, expenses, etc. and how much money do you think Collins has to show for the three seasons in which he’s been a rising star in the league? Certainly not enough to feel financially comfortable for the rest of his life.

But – barring catastrophic injury – Collins’ next contract is going to be a huge financial haul that should set up him and his family for decades.

By comparison, Lavonte David of the Buccaneers signed a five-year $50M contract with more than $25M guaranteed last August. Both play outside linebacker at a high level. Both were initially second-round picks (David, No. 58 in 2012; Collins, No. 52 in 2013).

Then there are players like Harmon and Ryan – good rising players who are not going to be paid like stars and may never be Pro Bowlers but are going to play in the league for a long time. Last season, Ryan took a huge step forward, starting opposite Malcolm Butler, putting up some outstanding advanced statistics and increasing his profile around the league. Harmon had a similar year. Ryan will have made $2.77M by the end of his rookie deal; Harmon will make $2.71M.

Unlike Collins, who is a freak talent and is going to get teams throwing tens of millions at him, Ryan and Harmon have a little more uncertainty. If the Patriots present them with offers prior to this year, do they take the security of knowing they are program mainstays or do they wait it out and test the market.

Ryan can look at a player like Buster Skrine who signed a $25M deal with the Jets last year and say, “Whoa… that could be me.” Harmon will have to see the offer he gets from the Patriots and compare it to the one the team gave his good friend Devin McCourty last year ($47.5M). Is Harmon half the player McCourty is? One-third? Will another team see in Harmon the potential to be comparable to McCourty?

Hightower, a former first-round pick, is more financially set than the other guys staring at second contracts. Hightower was down to make $7.724M from 2012-15. The Patriots picked up his fifth-year option for 2016 which will pay him $7.75M. So he’s in position to make more than $15M by the end of the season. He’s another player who could command more than $50M in a new deal if he goes to free agency. Would he be willing to take the security of staying in New England for a deal that may not be as lucrative as what he could command on the open market?

That’s what Jerod Mayo did and it proved to be the right move. Mayo – who came into the league under the previous CBA that was more lucrative for rookie first-rounders – agreed to a five-year extension in December of 2011 before his fourth NFL season was up, 15 months before he would have become a free agent. The extension was worth $48.5M. Mayo wound up on season-ending IR in 2013, 2014 and 2015 and he renegotiated his deal a couple of times but there was good security built into that deal. He retired recently having made more than $42M in the NFL.

We could go on with individual situations – Malcolm Butler could reasonably expect to make more than Janoris Jenkins who signed with the Giants for $62M this offseason, but Butler’s two years from unrestricted free agency and making less than $1M in salary this year; Jabaal Sheard needed to prove himself after a slow start to his career in Cleveland led him to a the two-year, $11M deal he signed with the Patriots. He’s en route to doing that and is – thanks to signing that short-term deal – in line to get another crack to cash in while in his prime.

And nobody should begrudge these players for doing so. We all know by now the future physical peril they put themselves in and we will never run out of stories related to young men who blew their money thinking it would never dry up. The players owe it to themselves and their families to make sure they are compensated as well as they can be.

Belichick, Caserio and the Krafts are aware of that too. Their chore is to do right by as many of these guys as they can against a hard salary cap and make sure the team isn’t mortgaged to its eyeballs.

It’s as complex a contractual puzzle as I can recall.

Stork: 'So far so good' working with Scarnecchia

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Stork: 'So far so good' working with Scarnecchia

CAMBRIDGE -- Brian Stork and several of his teammates on the Patriots offensive line will have to deal with a new voice in their positional meetings this season.

As a fourth-round draft pick in 2014, Stork is one of a handful of Tom Brady's personal protectors who've never played for Dante Scarnecchia before this season. Now that Scarnecchia is back on staff as Patriots offensive line chief after two years of retirement, the third-year center and his teammates are getting accustomed to their new boss. 

"So far so good," said Stork, who spoke to reporters at Harvard Satdium following a football clinic for disabled students run by AccesSportAmerica. "Just do what I'm told and try to get better."

Patriots offensive tackles Nate Solder, Sebastian Vollmer and Marcus Cannon as well as guard Josh Kline were all on the team during Scarnecchia's last season in 2013 so they have some sense of what they're in for.

The others -- including Stork, center David Andrews, guards Shaq Mason, Tre' Jackson, Joe Thuney and Ted Karras and tackles LaAdrian Waddle and Cameron Fleming -- will find themselves following orders from someone other than Dave DeGuglielmo, whose contract wasn't renewed at the end of last season, for the first time in their pro careers. 

It might be a bit of a wakeup call, according to one former Patriots offensive lineman who knows Scarnecchia well.

“[Scarnecchia will] just [bring] a demanding style, which he coaches with," Logan Mankins told the Providence Journal earlier this offseason. "He’ll always have his guys prepared and if they’re not prepared he’ll find someone that is prepared. That’s the best thing about Dante. Those young guys have a rude awakening coming. They have never had anyone like him. They better be in shape because he’s going to test you."

Though many of the offensive linemen on the Patriots haven't played for Scarnecchia, they knew who he was before he was re-hired. Even in retirement, he helped the Patriots during the pre-draft process in each of the last two years, working out linemen and reporting back to coach Bill Belichick and director of player personnel Nick Caserio. 

Scarnecchia is close with Florida State offensive line coach Rick Trickett so both Stork and Jackson have interacted with him in the past. He also worked out Mason during Mason's pro day last year. 

Phase Two of the Patriots offseason training program began on Monday, meaning that coaches and players are now able to work together on the practice field to perform drills and do some instruction. While offense versus defense sessions are prohibited, it's the first time Scarnecchia will be able to teach some of his new pupils. 

From the sounds of it, Stork likes the way it's going.

"It's nice to be home," he said. "I definitely missed it. It's great to be back with all the guys and just getting ready for next year. Definitely really excited."