Brady-led offense fails to execute

191543.jpg

Brady-led offense fails to execute

By Danny Picard
CSNNE.com

FOXBORO -- It's hard to believe.

Those were the words out of Matt Light's mouth following Sunday's 28-21 season-ending playoff loss to the New York Jets. What's hard to believe is that New England's offense didn't execute like it has all season long.

That offense starts with Tom Brady.

The Patriots' quarterback finished the game 29-of-45 for 299 yards while throwing two touchdowns and one interception. In the process, he moved into a tie with Terry Bradshaw for fifth on the NFL's all-time playoff touchdown pass list, with 30.

But on this day, two touchdowns just wasn't enough.

"It's like you're on the treadmill, running at 10 miles an hour, and then someone just hits the stop button," said Brady of the season's abrupt ending. "So I think we certainly expected to play better today. I think we're a pretty good football team, but not when we played like we did today."

From the start of training camp, questions about a young and inexperienced defense led to the popular belief that Brady's offense would have to carry the load this season.

As the weeks went by, it became more and more evident that the "bend-but-don't-break" defense, while competent enough, needed help from its offense.

So often this season, the Patriots were able to sustain their defense "bending" because they averaged 32.4 points per game, more than any other team in football. And they scored those points early and often.

Brady led that regular-season offensive outburst with 36 touchdown passes and only four interceptions.

So to see him with only one touchdown through three quarters, as well as an interception in the team's first possession, was, as Light said, hard to believe.

"We just didn't make the plays," said Light. "When we had a little rhythm, we stopped short. When we needed to convert, we didn't do it. We didn't help out our defense. I just think, overall, we didn't execute the way we have in the past. It's kind of hard to believe."

For the second straight playoff game, Brady turned the ball over in his team's first possession of the game. Last year, Terrell Suggs forced a Brady fumble on the offense's third play from the line of scrimmage. This year, Jets linebacker David Harris picked off an overthrown Brady screen pass, intended for BenJarvus Green-Ellis.

"Fortunately, Brady overthrew his back, and I was in the right place at the right time," said Harris. "I was just trying to get as much out of it as possible, but I ran out of gas. It's a long way to the end zone."

Harris ran from his own 30-yard line to the Patriots' 12 after the interception. The Jets then missed a field goal, so the mistake wasn't costly. But after the Pats took a 3-0 lead in their second possession, they punted two straight times, and failed to convert on a fake punt attempt, going into the half trailing 14-3.

"We talked all week about fast starts, and getting ahead of these guys, and playing from ahead," said Brady. "We had some opportunities there in the first quarter, and we really let those slip away. We made it a dog fight, and ultimately, couldn't really dig ourselves out of the holes we made."

Brady was sacked five times in the loss, but even during plays in which he had all the time in the world, his execution wasn't what it was throughout the regular season.

His first touchdown pass of the game came with 13 seconds left in the third quarter, on a two-yard pass over the middle to Alge Crumpler. The two-point conversion cut New York's lead to 14-11.

Brady's second touchdown pass came in the final minute of the fourth, when he found a wide-open Deion Branch in the back of the end zone to cut the Jets' lead to 28-21. But by then, the Patriots would have needed a miracle to send it to overtime.

It was too little, too late for a Brady-led offense that looked out of rhythm from the opening possession for the second straight postseason game at home, including last year's loss to the Baltimore Ravens at Gillette Stadium.

That even included a fourth-quarter drive, while still trailing by two scores, in which there seemed to be zero sense of urgency. They chewed up eight minutes on the clock before giving up the ball on downs with a little more than five minutes remaining, sealing their fate.

"We thought that if we could get it in the end zone, it's a three-point game," said Brady.

"I thought we had an opportunity there, but . . . we just couldn't get the ball in the end zone when we needed to."

It was something they were able to do all season long. And in return, it took a ton of pressure off their defense.

And as hard as it is to believe, the Brady-led offense didn't show up on Sunday, in the biggest game of the year.

"We've seen Brady play poorly before," said Jets cornerback Darrelle Revis. "We saw it in the first game when we played him. In the second game, he seemed more focused. This game, he was a little confused out there."

"Just a lack of execution," said Brady. "In order to score points, you have to consistently be able to put together plays, and we could never really do that or find a rhythm. They made a lot of plays. They didn't make many mistakes. We made too many mistakes. There were too many plays that weren't the way we drew them up."

Danny Picard is on Twitter at http:twitter.comDannyPicard. You can listen to Danny on his streaming radio show I'm Just Sayin' Monday-Friday from 9-10 a.m. on CSNNE.com.

Know Thine Enemy: A complete breakdown of the Ravens

Know Thine Enemy: A complete breakdown of the Ravens

After a 3-0 start, the Ravens dropped a 28-27 decision to the Raiders in Baltimore. That started a four-game skid for Baltimore which included back-to-back losses at the Jets and Giants. But they got back on track against the Steelers and have won four out of five with their only being to the Cowboys. It’s hard to get a clean read on who they really are. 

They had narrow, early-season wins over crap teams like Cleveland and Jacksonville. They had a narrow loss to an outstanding Raiders team and were close with the Cowboys but got run over late with Dallas scoring on its last five possessions. They are coming off their most impressive team win, a 38-6 triumph over the Dolphins. 

This game is a big one in the AFC race not just because it’s a divisional leader but also because it will be a common game between the Patriots and Raiders. The Raiders already beat Baltimore. 

The Pats need to keep pace in a tiebreaker they currently trail. Weird schedule quirk? The Ravens have had only one road game that required a long commute since September. That was the game at Dallas. They just played six of their last nine and four of their last five at home.

LAST 5

Ravens 21, Steelers 14
Ravens 28, Browns 7
At Cowboys 27, Ravens 17
Ravens 19, Bengals 14
Ravens 38, Dolphins 6

OFFENSIVE STATS TO CHEW ON

More than half of Joe Flacco’s 323 completions have gone to three players: tight end Dennis Pitta (61 catches), wide receiver Mike Wallace (57) and wide receiver Steve Smith (54). Those players are 31, 30 and 37 respectively so it’s a veteran group.
Flacco is 114 of 159 (72 percent) with nine touchdowns and three picks in Baltimore’s last four games. He has 15 TDs and 11 picks this season.

The Ravens don’t run it much: 502 pass attempts, 287 rushing attempts. Terrence West and Kenneth Dixon are the lead backs. West has carried more than 15 times in a game on three occasions this season.

Rookie left tackle Ronnie Stanley has been playing very well as has the rest of the Ravens offensive line in recent weeks. Still, Baltimore is just at 34.1 on third down conversions.

DEFENSIVE STATS TO CHEW ON

The Ravens have allowed 207 points this season, tied with the Patriots for lowest in the AFC and just behind Seattle (194) overall.
Baltimore’s allowing just 33.3 percent conversions on third down and only 3.4 yards per carry.

Opposing quarterbacks are completing 64.1 percent of their passes and have 21 touchdown passes and 14 picks against the Ravens defense. Ten of the Ravens 14 picks came against the Browns, Jaguars and in last week’s rout of Miami.
 
WHERE ARE THEIR HEADS AT

"I just think they've got a great team. They've got Tom Brady. They've been the best team in the conference, and it's going to be our toughest challenge of the year." – John Harbaugh, Ravens coach, on Monday night’s matchup

Bovada: Brady third in MVP race behind Elliot, Carr

brady_patriots_rams_12416.jpg

Bovada: Brady third in MVP race behind Elliot, Carr

Tom Brady has racked up some impressive numbers over eight games, but are they enough to surpass Cowboys running back Ezekiel Elliott or Raiders quarterback Derek Carr in the MVP race?

The Patriots have gone 7-1 since Brady returned from his four-game suspension to start the year, and the league's all-time winningest quarterback has completed 68.9 percent of his passes in that stretch (third in the league) for 2,470 yards. He has 19 touchdowns, he's been picked once, and he is averaging 8.2 yards per attempt (third), giving him a 113.1 quarterback rating (first). 

According to Bovada, he's currently the third-best bet to win MVP at 15/2, down from 4/1 last week. Ahead of him? Both Elliott (12/5) and Carr (7/2). 

The Carr comparison is an interesting one for obvious reasons. Because they play the same position, it's easier to match up their stats. In 12 games, Carr has completed 65.5 percent of his passes (12th) for 3,375 yards (fourth), 24 touchdowns (seventh) and five interceptions. He's averaging 7.4 yards per attempt (15th), and  he has a rating of 100.3 (seventh).

While Carr has the statistical advantage of playing in four more games than Brady has, he's also led his team to a record of 10-2 and the No. 1 seed in the AFC at the moment. (The Raiders hold the strength-of-victory tiebreaker edge over the Patriots, who are also 10-2.)

Meanwhile, Elliott, the talented rookie out of Ohio State who has the benefit of running behind arguably the league's best offensive line, has racked up 263 carries for 1,285 yards and 12 touchdowns this season. He's also posted 28 catches for 322 yards and a score. He leads the league in total rush yards, he's second in the league in rushing touchdowns behind Patriots running back LeGarrette Blount, and he's fourth in yards per attempt (4.9).