Bledsoe, Parcells head nominees for Pats' Hall

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Bledsoe, Parcells head nominees for Pats' Hall

By Tom E. Curran
CSNNE.com

Now it's going to get pretty interesting. Drew Bledsoe, Bill Parcells and Houston Antwine are the 2011 three nominees for the Patriots Hall of Fame. Voting starts today, April 15, at Patriots.com. Fans have a month to vote. The winner will be announced the week of May 16. And this promises to be the most fascinating race since the teambegan this system in 2007 of having nominees put forth by a committee then openingvoting to fans. Fans have a month to vote. The winner will be announced the week of May 16. And this promises to be the most fascinating race since the team began this system in 2007 of having nominees put forth by a committee then opening voting to fans.

In Bledsoe, you have a player almost single-handedly responsible for resuscitating on-field hope for a franchise that - before his arrival - was only relevant as an NFL punchline. Drafted by Parcells, he was here for nine seasons. Six of them were good ones. Five of them were loaded with anticipation that Bledsoe would be the next MarinoKellyMoon. Even though his play spiraled downward in the final days of Pete Carroll and the early days of Bill Belichick, even though his departure was unseemly (traded within the division a year after signing a 10-year, 103 million contract), his mark here is indelible.

So too was the mark left by Parcells, though. He's the one that drafted Bledsoe. He's the one that remade the team, created a program and changed the perception of the franchise. He was only in town four years. He led the Patriots to the playoffs in 1994 and the Super Bowl in 1996 but his dismount from the team was ugly. He fled to the Jets after getting uppity about what he perceived to be the meddlesome ownership of the Krafts.

Finally, there's Antwine. A three-time nominee, Antwine played 11 seasons for the Patriots, appearing in 142 games (1961-71). He led the Patriots in sacks for three consecutive seasons from 1967-69 and his 39.0 career sacks are tied for 10th (with Richard Seymour) on the Patriots all-time career sacks list. Antwine earned six consecutive American Football League (AFL) All-Star selections from 1963-68. His six all-star appearances are tied for the third highest total in franchise history. He was named to the All-Time All-AFL Team, the Patriots All-1960s team as well as the Patriots 50th Anniversary Team.

Last month, seven-time all-star center Jon Morris was the 17th person to be inducted into the teams hall of fame by a newly formed senior committee.

The complete list of Patriots Hall of Famers is listed below:

John Hannah (1991)

Nick Buoniconti (1992)

Gino Cappelletti (1992)

Bob Dee (1993)

Jim Lee Hunt (1993)

Steve Nelson (1993)

Vito Babe Parilli (1993)

Mike Haynes (1994)

Steve Grogan (1995)

Andre Tippett (1999)

Bruce Armstrong (2001)

Stanley Morgan (2007)

Ben Coates (2008)

Jim Nance (2009)

Sam Cunningham (2010)

Jon Morris (2011)

Tom E. Curran can be reached at tcurran@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Tom on Twitter at http:twitter.comtomecurran

All three Patriots QBs will travel to preseason finale vs. Giants

All three Patriots QBs will travel to preseason finale vs. Giants

FOXBORO - While there’s no official word yet on how the playing time will be divided among the Patriots quarterbacks, all three will travel to New Jersey for the preseason finale against the Giants on Thursday night.

There has been plenty of speculation about how much playing time Tom Brady, Jimmy Garoppolo and Jacoby Brissett would get, and if Brady would even travel with the team. 

Brady will begin serving his four-game Deflategate suspension on Saturday at 4 p.m. so the game provides his last opportunity to play before he returns to the Patriots before he returns for preparations for the Week 5 matchup in Cleveland on Oct. 9. 

Brady said Tuesday that he hoped to play Thursday night.

More to come….

 

Garoppolo on Kaepernick, anthem: 'To each his own, I guess'

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Garoppolo on Kaepernick, anthem: 'To each his own, I guess'

Jimmy Garoppolo joined WEEI's Kirk and Callahan Show on Wednesday as the Patriots readied themselves to travel to New Jersey for their preseason finale against the Giants. During the interview, Garoppolo was asked for his thoughts on 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who opted not to stand for the national anthem during a recent preseason game in order to express his political beliefs.

"It’s a touchy subject, but to each his own, I guess," Garoppolo said. "It’s not my idea of doing the right thing. But it’s his personal opinion, I guess. You’ve just got to let him stand by that. But I think we have a great thing going on in this country. Everything about America, it’s a great thing. We’re all very blessed to be here. And it’s good to realize that."

NFL teams have been required to be on the field for the anthem since 2009. Garoppolo said that he uses those moments as a time to soak in the chance he's been given to play football at the highest level.

"I can’t tell you what exactly is going through my mind, because it’s right before the game, you’ve got a lot of emotions rolling and everything," he said. "But it’s kind of one of those moments you get to sit back and really appreciate where you are and the opportunity that you have. The NFL is a tough gig to get into and a tough gig to stay in. I feel blessed to be in it. It’s a great opportunity. It’s one of those moments you get to just sit back and realize where you’re at -- then go kick some ass after that."

Belichick: Players don’t have time to be coaching each other

Belichick: Players don’t have time to be coaching each other

FOXBORO - It's been an ongoing conversation/fascination this summer. With Tom Brady's four-game suspension looming, how much knowledge, support and coaching was he going to give to Jimmy Garoppolo?

Bill Belichick was asked by Phil Perry on Thursday how much he expects from veteran players when it comes to coaching up teammates. 

The answer? Be an example, but let the coaches coach. 

"I think veteran players can be a good example for younger players in terms of their preparation, and their attitude, and their work ethic, and the way they go about things," said Belichick. "We have a lot of guys that I would put in that category that when you watch them do things they do them right and it’s easy to say to a younger player ‘Do what that guy does’, and you’d be off to a good start. 

"But you know, that being said, I think everybody on the team, really their number one focus is to get ready to play football. Our players aren’t coaches, they’re players, and they need to get ready to play, and as I said, I think every player needs to get ready to play. I don’t care how long you’ve been in the league, I don’t care what positon you play, I don’t care how long you’ve coached, I don’t care what position you coach. We haven’t done it for a long time, a number of months, and now we all need to sharpen those skills up. That’s every player, that’s every coach, so I don’t really think players have a lot of time to run around and be telling everybody else what to do."

The answer is not surprising. As much as the "Do Your Job" mantra is espoused in New England, to think Belichick or his mostly veteran staff of coaches would want players monkeying with the message is a little naive. Certainly, there are things players can impart to teammates who play the same position. Things coaches might not see from the sidelines or from upstairs. And Belichick's made a point of saying that in the past: there are things players on the field know and have experienced that the coaches may not be able to articulate as clearly. Junior Seau was a resource and touchstone for defensive teammates during his time in New England. 

But there's a difference between giving helpful pointers when they are sought or being a locker room sage and coaching. 

"Honestly, there is enough that all of them need to work on individually, and that would be every single player, that’s a full plate for them," added Belichick. "I don’t really think that’s their job, and I don’t think any player has enough time to do that because they all have things that they need to do to prepare for the season. But as far as being a good example and doing things right and all of that, I mean we have a lot of guys that fall into that category and that’s definitely a good thing. But, you know, that’s what they should be doing."

For two seasons and three offseasons, Garoppolo's had a chance to observe how Brady prepares, studies, interacts and leads. No doubt they've had countless conversations about the Patriots offensive philosophy and the throws and checks that need to be made in certain situations. But the job of actually coaching Garoppolo falls to Belichick and offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels. 

Any successes of failures Garoppolo has during the four weeks Brady is off campus will belong to him and his coaches. And that's how it should be.