Patriots coaching staff looks within during bye week

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Patriots coaching staff looks within during bye week

Bill Belichick knows how important it is to make use of the bye week. The extra time off isn't all about rest and relaxation. For the Patriots coaching staff, the extra time allotted to them before their Week 10 game against Buffalo will be maximized in an effort to find out what's working, what isn't, and what can be done better in the second half of the season.

The Patriots coaching staff has already had an opportunity to do some work since returning home from London on Monday.

"Well we got back in yesterday and kind of started to get re-organized here," Belichick said in a conference call on Tuesday. "So todays a good day for us to catch up on a few loose ends in the last few weeks, first half of the season, and really turn our attention to Buffalo and start getting ready for them, take advantage of the extra time, try to do a good job there."

To improve during the bye, Belichick said that he and his staff will turn their focus inward for a period of time, analyzing themselves and their tendencies rather than focusing purely on their next opponent. There is some self-scouting that takes place every week, but during the bye there's time to dig a little deeper.

"This is a good opportunity for us to try and look at some things that we can do better going forward," Belichick said. "But also looking back at maybe things that we could spend more time on to try to improve over the little bit of extra time this week from things that didnt go so well at other points, whether it was last week or some other week or some other problem that may have been re-occurring or something we hadnt done as well as wed like to do."

Everything's fair game. The Patriots will analyze statistical information as well as film in order to iron things out. They'll even dive into their own playbook to see if there are any trends that need to be fixed.

"Sometimes we just look at it and you see a group of 15 or 20 plays in a certain situation -- red area, two minute, third down, outside runs, inside runs, whatever it happens to be," Belichick said. "Sometimes something just jumps out at you. Its probably something youre aware of but maybe its a little bit more prevalent than what you expected."

The Patriots will even scout how other teams have scouted them. If they see that their opponents are playing the same way every week, then they know something's up.

"If were kind of seeing the same coverages," Belichick said, "or the same front or the same plays or the same formations are repeating -- whatever it happens to be on a consistent basis, then theres probably a reason for that that teams are trying to create some type of advantage or positioning that we were having trouble with for some reason."

The bye week is the time to figure out exactly what those things are.

Even with the time off, it should be a busy week at Gillette Stadium. While it will be important for players to rest up and receive treatment on their lingering injuries, Belichick and his staff will be hard at work, angling for whatever advantage they can find as they prepare for the second half of the season.

Tom Brady on pace to dwarf deep-ball passing numbers from 2016

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Tom Brady on pace to dwarf deep-ball passing numbers from 2016

FOXBORO -- When the Patriots traded their first-round pick in the 2017 draft for Brandin Cooks, they gave Tom Brady one of the most productive deep-ball receivers in the NFL over the course of the last few seasons. 

The Cooks acquisition not only made the Patriots offense more versatile, it also may have signaled an acknowledgement that the team needed more pass-catchers who could produce down the field and outside the numbers.

In the playoffs last season, against Houston's and Atlanta's defenses -- both of which were effective at times in taking away the short-to-intermediate areas of the field -- the Patriots could have benefited from someone like Cooks. In both games, the Patriots were able to hit on throws deep and on the outside in critical moments with likes of Julian Edelman, Chris Hogan and Malcolm Mitchell. 

Now after three weeks, and after having faced two defenses in Houston's and Kansas City's that were intent on packing the middle of the field with defenders, it's clear that the move to grab Cooks is paying dividends. 

In Sunday's win over the Texans, 36-33, Brady threw eight passes that traveled at least 20 yards in the air, and he completed five for 185 yards and three scores, according to Pro Football Focus. On the season, Brady leads the league with 22 attempts of 20 yards or more, per PFF. He's completed 11 of those for 368 yards and four touchdowns. His passer rating on deep attempts (135.4) is second in the league. 

Compare that to last season's totals for Brady on deep passes -- 23 completions for 834 yards and eight touchdowns -- and he's on pace to blow those numbers away. Whereas he only attempted deep passes on just over 11 percent of his throws last season, according to PFF, so far this year one in every five of his throws is traveling 20 yards or more.

The biggest beneficiary of the new approach? Cooks, of course, who Brady has dubbed "Cookie." 

PFF says Cooks is leading the league in deep-ball receiving through three weeks, with 187 yards on five deep catches. Three of those came on Sunday and they resulted in 111 yards and two scores. In Week 1, Cooks had three catches for 88 yards -- including a 54-yarder -- and he drew three penalties that resulted in an additional 38 yards. In Week 2, Cooks had two catches for 37 yards -- including a 22-yarder.

Last year? The leading receiver for the Patriots on passes that traveled 20 yards or more was Hogan (10 catches for 397 yards). 

One more indication that the Patriots offense has shifted with Cooks in and Edelman sidelined: Cooks leads the NFL in yards per catch through three games (25.6 yards per reception), while Danny Amendola (16.4 yards per reception, seventh) and Rob Gronkowski (14.9, 13th) are all found among the league leaders in that category.  

Opposing defenses may continue to play the Patriots as the Texans and Chiefs did this season: Flood the middle of the field and pressure Brady with just three or four linemen. They may be content with allowing Brady to attempt lower-percentage throws down the field as opposed to letting him slice them up with shorter tosses. 

It worked well enough for the Chiefs to win, and it nearly worked well enough for the Texans. Perhaps "the blueprint" is still the blueprint. But with the addition to Cooks, Brady and the Patriots have proven that they've evolved to more efficiently combat those schemes.

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Morning Skate: Blackhawks looking for right mix on fourth line

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Morning Skate: Blackhawks looking for right mix on fourth line

Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading. while readying for the last home game of the preseason tonight. Boy that went by quickly.

*Chicago Blackhawks coach Joel Quenneville is looking for the right mix on the fourth line for the Hawks.

*The NHL is coming late to the China party and it makes one wonder what will happen for the Winter Olympic Games set to be played there in 2022.

*PHT writer Adam Gretz has the Arizona Coyotes wanting to retire the freshly-retired Shane Doan’s number in the future.

*Pittsburgh Penguins coach Mike Sullivan says that the decision to accept the White House’s invitation was independent of politics. Certainly, it was, but the timing of it and the feeble statement to go along with it left a lot to be desired.

*Pierre Lebrun goes 1-on-1 with Montreal Canadiens coach Claude Julien to talk about his past, his present and his future behind the bench with the Habs. I had always intended to subscribe to the Athletic, and this is the article that finally got me to do it as I get to read a few moments with one of the classiest individuals in the NHL in Julien. It certainly had a few rocky moments toward the end here in Boston for Julien, but I will always respect that guy as a coach and, more importantly, as a person.  

*For something completely different: an interesting look at Alejandro Villanueva, the only Pittsburgh Steelers player, and a proud veteran, to stand outside the tunnel and on the field for the national anthem prior to the Steelers game on Sunday.