Part One: Determine the market for top free agent outfielders Carl Crawford and Jayson Werth.

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Part One: Determine the market for top free agent outfielders Carl Crawford and Jayson Werth.

1) Determine the market for top free agent outfielders Carl Crawford and Jayson Werth.

Since midseason, these two names have been inexorably linked to the Red Sox. Crawford offers speed, defense and athleticism while Werth would provide the Sox, increasingly lefthanded, with some righthanded sock.

But the Sox will have no shortage of competition for both. After two seasons in which spending has been down across the board, the expectation is that teams are ready to splurge again.

"When it's all said and done,'' said one baseball executive, "I think people are going to be shocked at how much both (Werth and Crawford) get. It's going to be insane.''

Another executive estimated that while Crawford (right) should get a six-year deal, he'll likely end up with a seven-year pact. As for Werth, the same executive said a four-year deal would make the most sense, but thanks to the sheer number of teams interested, he'll likely land a five-year deal.

Crawford has been linked to the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, the Detroit Tigers and Texas Rangers. Werth is expected to receive interest from his current team, the Philadelphia Phillies as well as others.

If Crawford is going to get a seven-year, 120 million deal, as some expect, will the Red Sox consider that illogical? Ditto for Werth (left), for whom a Jason Bay deal (four-years, 66 million) once seemed likely, but now might be able to command a five-year, 80 million or more.

It's worth noting that since becoming general manager, Epstein has only given one deal longer than four years to a position player -- J.D. Drew's, five-year, 70 million contract after the 2006 season.

(It's also worth noting that that contract came after the last time the Sox failed to make the playoffs -- as they did this season).

The Sox have plenty of money to spend. With about 120 million in contractual obligations, they're some 45 million shy of last year's payroll figure. But it wouldn't be a huge surprise if the Sox sat on most of that money and instead budgeted it for in-season acquisitions (see 2009 -- Victor Martinez, Billy Wagner, Alex Gonzalez) or held onto the money with an eye toward next winter when a number of franchise sluggers (Adrian Gonzalez, Prince Fielder, Albert Pujols) hit the free-agent market.

Next: See what sort of interest exists for Daisuke Matsuzaka

Report: Celtics express deep trade interest in P.J. Tucker

Report: Celtics express deep trade interest in P.J. Tucker

The Boston Celtics are lining up a consolation prize in the event they are unable to land Bulls guard Jimmy Butler

The Celtics are deeply interested in Phoenix Suns forward P.J. Tucker, according to Sporting News' Sean Deveney. In 57 games this season, the 31-year-old has averaged seven points, 6.0 rebounds, 1.5 steals and 1.3 assists. The 6-foot-6, 245-pounder has played in Pheonix for five seasons. In the year before that, he spent his rookie season with the Toronto Raptors.

Tucker would join a group of shooting forwards in Jae Crowder, Jaylen Brown and Gerald Green.

The addition of Tucker isn't nearly as significant as Butler, but that may be just why the Celtics are interested. Deveney explained Tucker's "amicable" attitude and experience could be a nice fit in the Celtics' already cohesive locker room. Butler is a big splash acquisition that may make a big splash in the locker room, and he would require adjustments from Isaiah Thomas.

Moreland not worried about filling Ortiz's shoes because 'there's no replacing him'

Moreland not worried about filling Ortiz's shoes because 'there's no replacing him'

FORT MYERS, Fla. -- Mitch Moreland knows he's likely the only new player in Boston's lineup since David Ortiz retired at the end of last season.

He's just not listening to those who say he needs to replace Big Papi's lofty production.

"I try not to hear it because there's no replacing that guy," said the 31-year-old first baseman, who signed a one-year, $5.5-million deal with the Red Sox during the offseason.

"I think it's going to be more of a team effort," he said. "Obviously we picked up two big arms as well, and it's a very balanced club."

After playing his first six-plus seasons in the majors with the Texas Rangers, Moreland is with a new organization for the first time in his career. So far, he said, the move has been smooth.

"They welcomed me from Day One," he said. "Handshakes and hugs right off the bat. It's going to be a lot of fun. You can see why they had so much success last year."

Coming off a subpar 2016 with a .233 batting average, 22 homers and 60 RBI, Moreland tested free agency. He wanted to go to a team that had a good chance at competing for a championship -- like he felt with the Rangers.

"Something that was at the top of my list as a player," he said. "If I was going to be on a team, I wanted a team that had a chance to win. It makes it that much more fun to come to the park every day when something's on the line and you're fighting for a chance to play in the playoffs, fighting to win the division and fighting to win a World Series."

A first-time Gold Glove winner last season, Moreland knows the defending A.L. East champion Red Sox wanted his defensive skills at first to allow Hanley Ramirez to shift to Ortiz's vacated DH spot.

"It gives you a little more confidence," Moreland said. "I take pride in that. That's going to be my main goal, to go out and show what they saw."

A left-handed batter like Ortiz, Moreland knows some people will expect him to fill the void offensively because of which side of the plate he bats from.

"I think it'll be a group effort picking up what will be missing," he said. "There's no replacing that guy."

Manager John Farrell also said the club needs to move on from Ortiz so Moreland and everyone else can relax and focus on their own game.

"David's effect on the lineup was felt by a number of people. We know opponents would game plan for David," Farrell said. "I think it's important for our guys - as we put David out of our mind, in a good way - that it's still a focus on what their strengths are in the strike zone."

The transition may be easy for Moreland so far, but one thing has certainly changed: spending spring training in Florida instead of Arizona.

"Fishing's a lot different than Arizona, so that's nice," he said.

NOTES: "We're getting a firsthand look to why he's been so successful and an elite pitcher," Farrell said after left-hander Chris Sale pitched batting practice. The Red Sox acquired Sale from the Chicago White Sox in an offseason trade for four prospects. They also acquired right-handed, hard-throwing setup man Tyler Thornburg from Milwaukee . . . Farrell said righty Steven Wright, who missed the final two months of the season with a shoulder injury, "was unrestricted in his throwing." . . . The Red Sox will have a shorter workout Tuesday with the players association set to talk to the team and the organization's annual charity golf tournament in the afternoon.